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Publication numberUS2784659 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 12, 1957
Filing dateNov 24, 1951
Priority dateNov 24, 1951
Publication numberUS 2784659 A, US 2784659A, US-A-2784659, US2784659 A, US2784659A
InventorsDe Roo William C, Kietzmann Alfred E, Winchester Paul D
Original AssigneeHart & Cooley Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Diffuser for air conditioning
US 2784659 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 12, 1957 w, g, 35 00 ETAL 2,784,659

DIFFUSER FOR AIR CONDITIONING Filed NOV. 24, 1951 INV TORS. WILLIAM C. 085%0 PAUL D. WINCHESTER ALFRED E. KIETZMANN United States Patent F DIFFUSER FOR AIR CONDITIONING William C. De R00, Paul D. Winchester, and Alfred E. Kietzmann, Holland, Micln, assignors to Hart & Cooley Manufacturing (30., Holland, Mich, a corporation of Delaware Application November 24, 1951, Serial No. 258,014

5 Claims. (Cl. 98-40) This invention relates in general to a novel design of register or air diffuser to be located in the walls or ceilings of enclosed areas such as the rooms in a residence. Although the prime purpose of the invention is for the perimeter heating of such a room, it will be obvious that the invention is equally applicable for the cooling or air conditioning of areas, and wherever heating or perim- 4 from the wall. In some cases the tins of the register may be set to direct the air straight outwardly from the wall.

This type of register in general has been used for many years in connection with forced air systems where the air ducts were inserted in the inside walls of the structure and the air was projected toward outside walls. Such registers were mounted either in the baseboard or on the inside wall just above the baseboard or near the ceiling.

The advent of basementless structures brought with it a new phase of heating which taught that registers placed close to the outside walls give much more comfort than the use of the conven-tional types of registers located on the inside walls of the structure. With this in mind it was found necessary and desirable to develop a wall register or air diffuser which was so designed as to blanket the outside wall with a curtain of air in a manner similar to the results accomplished by the use of a conventional floor type register which is usually located about six inches away from the outside wall in the floor. The floor register projects the air upwardly into the room parallel with the outside wall and in a fan-shaped pattern which effectually sets up a curtain of air between the occupied space and the outside wall.

Wall or floor registers are usually considered as having directional fins which direct air passing therebetween into the room in a direction away from the register and at an angle with respect thereto. The problem here was to design a side wall register which, instead of directing the air outwardly into the room in a direction away from the wall, would cause the air to emerge from the register and pass upwardly parallel to the Wall and which would cause the air to fan outwardly to effectually blanket the wall with a curtain of air between the occupied space and the outside wall. Since registers customarily act as directional grilles, the present invention has been termed an air diffuser because of its action in diffusing the air over the wall area rather than directing the air outwardly into.

present invention is designed primarily to accomplish the ice result of directing the air as a blanket adjacent the wall throughout substantially and at the same time is designed to appeal to the eye.

In view of the foregoing, it is a principal object of the present invention to provide an air diffuser of such design as to cause air emerging therefrom to form an air curtain blanketing the wall in which the diffuser-is mounted.

Another object of the invention is to provide an air diffuser which has a plurality of groups of fins therein so designed and arranged that when the diffuser is mounted in a wall, some of the air passing therethrough will form an air curtain blanketing the wall throughout substantially 180 and other portions of the air passing therethrough will be directed downwardly toward the floor.

A further object of the invention is to provide a wall air diffuser for perimeter heating of a room which has therein a plurality of groups of fins wherein at least least some of the fins are longitudinally arcuate and are so combined with and are located with respect to the fins in other groups that the air passing between the various fins will blend and provide an air curtain which blankets the wall in which the diffuser is mounted.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a wall air diffuser for perimeter heating wherein opposed groups of longitudinally arcuate fins are located to the i right and left of the center of the diffuser and which blend with a group of other fins of the upper portion in the diffuser in such a manner that air passing between the fins in each group will blend together and form air curtain which blankets the wall inwhich the diffuser is mounted.

Still another and more specific object of the invention is to provide a wall air diffuser whereina plurality of supporting and dividing bars or mullions extend radially outwardly from a common support in the face of the diffuser dividing the face into a plurality of sections and wherein the opposed end sections have a plurality of longitudinally arcuate fins supported at their ends by adjacent bars and fan outwardly from a common center for each section. Substantially straight fins are provided in the upper part of the diffuser in a section between the sections containing the arcuate fins and which blend with the arcuate fins to present an eye-appealing structure as well as one wherein the airpassing therethrough will blend and blanket the wall in a curtaining effect,

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent upon reading the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of an air diffuser embodying the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the structure shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal horizontal sectional view taken along the plane of line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an end elevational view of the structure shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view taken along the plane ofline 5-5 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view illustrating in detail a portion of the structure shown in Fig. 5; and

Patented Mar. 12, 1957.

a encies ing the wall rather than one which would direct the air into the room in an angular direction away from the wall. While some variations from the structure disclosed herein may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention, it has been discovered that certain features of the design as illustrated here are necessary. For example, it is necessary that the fins in each side of the diffuser which are located in the end sections on each side of the center thereof should be longitudinally arcuate and should increase in lengthprogre'ssively outwardly from their center of curvature in fan-shaped fashion.

It;was discovered also that the fins in the upper section of the diffuser need not necessarily be straight, as shown herein, but could be longitudinally curved somewhat, although, when curved to anexcessive degree, the blending of the emerging air in the desired manner to form an air curtain blanketingthe wall was not obtained throughout the entire 180 are necessary.

Another important feature is that the air passages between adjacent fins should be unobstructed to maintain maximum efficiency. In some register or grille structures the fins are stamped out of a sheet of metal and a lip is allowed to remain in the face of the diffuser which lip acts as an obstruction to the air passing through and prevents it from being diffused and distributed along the wall area.

Referring now more particularly to the drawing, and especially to Fig. 1, the air diffuser of the present invention is indicated generally by the numeral 1. All of the fins are stamped from a sheet of metal so that they are disposed within an integral metal frame preferably, though not necessarily, rectangular as indicated by the numeral 2. A plurality of supporting and dividing bars or mullions radiate outwardly from approximately a common center, and there may be any number of such bars provided there are not enough to prevent the desired result.

In Fig. 1 there is illustrated four such supporting and dividing bars indicated at 3, 4, 5, and 6. These bars all radiate outwardly from a center plate 7 integral therewith. The size and shape of the center supporting plate 7 and its location in the plane of the diffuser are not important considerations although it should be in the vicinity of the center of the diffuser to obtain the proper results. I The radially extending, dividing, and supporting bars 3, 4, 5 and 6 divide the area within the frame 2 into a plurality of sections. In the particular embodiment shown there is an upper central section 8, opposed end sections 9 and 10 and a smaller section 11 in the center and at the bottom. Each of the end sections 9 and 10 has a plurality of longitudinally arcuate fins or vanes 12 and 13 therein all of the fins in each section having a common center of curvature and extending in spaced relation outwardly fromthe central supporting plate 7 in substantially fan-shaped fashion. The fins 12 and 13 are all stamped out of the sheet metal member 1 in such a manner as to be severed at their. ends almost completely from the sheet metal member. The fins are all substantially parallel with each other and extend at an angle outwardly with respect to the plane of the frame at an angle of approximately 45 degrees.

It is important to note that when the fins are severed as above noted, and bent angularly there is no lip or flange extending along either edge of the fins so that the space between each fin through which the air passes is completely unobstructed from one end to the other.

Each fin is longitudinally arcuate and with the location of the central plate 7 as shown in Fig. l, the majority of the fins will be connected at their upper ends to the radially extending arms 3 and 4. The lower end of outer corners of the. area within the frame, such as those indicated at 14 and 15, will be connected at their ends between the adjacent sides of the frame itself.

Although it has been stated that the fins 12 and 13 should be disposed at an angle of approximately 45 degrees with respect to the plane of the diffuser, that angle is not critical except within certain limits. In general, it may be said that this angle can be from 45 degrees to 50 degrees and still obtain satisfactory results.

An important consideration, however, is that the passage between adjacent fins through which air passes outwardly into the room should be longer than it is wide. Since there is no metal left on the edge of the fin from where it is stamped out of the plate to form a flange or lip, the width of each fin is substantially the same as the distance between adjacent fins; that is to say, if the distance between adjacent fins is A as shown in Fig. 3 that distance will be substantially equal to the width B of each fin. However, the perpendicular distance C between the fins will be less than either A or B when the fins are disposed at an angle as shown thereby providing a completely unobstructed passage between adjacent fins when it is longer than it is wide.

The upper central section 8 is provided with a plurality of fins 16 connected at their ends to the radial arms 3 and 4 except for a few of the upper fins which are divided by an arm or mullion 17 having a pierced slot 18 therein to accommodate the handle 19 for opening and closing the register as will be pointed out more clearly hereinafter. The fins 16 in section 8 are of different length with the shortest fin at the bottom and the longest one at the top and are substantially straight as distinguished from the curved fins in the end sections 9 and 10. These fins 16 are likewise disposed at an angle of approximately 45 degrees with respect to the plane of the diffuser for directing air upwardly. Also, the fins 16 being of different length appear as fanshaped from the center plate 7 outwardly and upwardly to the frame 2.

Like the fins previously described, the fins 16 also are stamped from the single sheet of metal in such a Way as to provide an unobstructed passage between the fins for passage of air therethrough; that is to say, there is no lip or flange left along either edge of these fins, as will be clearly seen in Fig. 5.

With the foregoing construction and arrangement of fins, taking also into consideration the unobstructed passages between adjacent fins which passages are longer than they are wide, air passing therethrough will not be directed outwardly into the room at an angle with respect to the wall or ceiling in which the diffuser is mounted, but, rather, will emerge from the dilfuser and will blanket the wall or ceiling in a curtaining effect by reason of a vacuum ring surrounding the diffuser throughout substantially degrees. Experiments and smoke tests have actually proven this to be a fact.

A further important consideration in obtaining this result is that the straight fins 16 in the upper section 8 should be arranged so that the ends thereof will meet the upper ends of the fins 12 and 13 in the end sections 9 and 10. This arrangement is clearly shown in Fig. l of the drawing. As stated before, however, the most important consideration is to have the fins 12 and 13 in the end sections longitudinally arcuate while the contour of the fins 16 may be either straight as shown, or slightly curved.

The foregoing construction will provide a curtain of air which will blanket a wall or ceiling area around the diffuser rather than directing the air outwardly into the .room at an angle with respect to the wall or ceiling. -When the diffuser of the present invention is to be utilized in the wall of a room, it may be additionally desired also to provide fins 20 in the bottom section 11. These fins 20 are also preferably straight and are connected at their ends between the radial bars 5 and 6 although it is preferred that these fins 20 be disposed at an angle with respect to the plane of the diffuser which is greater than the .45 degrees or 50 degrees at which the other fins in the diffuser are disposed. trated in Fig. 5. i i

Again the fins 20 are stamped from the single sheet of metal and provide an unobstructed passage between adjacent fins but they are disposed at this greater angle so that they will have a directional effect on the air and will direct the air outwardly away from the wall and somewhat downwardly toward the floor.

The remaining structure of the diffuser as shown is common practice in the art where a closure member 21 is mounted at the rear of the diffuser on which a handle member 19 is attached which extends forwardly through the slot 18 as previously mentioned. A strip 22 is secured along the rear side of the metal plate near the upper part thereof which has elongated arcuate portion 23 adapted to receive a similar arcuate portion 24 along the upper edge of the closure member 21. The parts are arranged so that downward pressure on the handle 19 will pivot the closure member 21 rearwardly to permit air to pass outwardly between the fins in the face of the diffuser.

A resilient rubberlike sealing gasket 25 may be located within the rearwardly extending flange 26 around the edge of the frame and seal the diffuser against the wall or ceiling on which it is placed. A sin-all metal stop 27 may be held in place at the rear of the diffuser by means of a screw 28 which passes through the slot 18 and which may be adjusted longitudinally of the slot to limit the downward movement of the handle 19 when opening the closure member 21.

From the foregoing description it will be evident that a novel result has been obtained by the structure illustrated whereby air passing between the fins of the diffuser will be caused to form a blanket over the wall or ceiling over which the diffuser is mounted instead of being directed outwardly into the room at an angle. The need for the invention has been occasioned by the relatively recent placement of registers in the outside walls of homes. The air blankets the wall and forms a curtain between the outside wall and the occupants of a room. This result has been obtained primarily because of the angular disposition of the fins and the unobstructed passages which are longer than they are wide, together with the curved or longitudinally arcuate design of the fins in the end sections.

These oppositely disposed groups of arcuate fins may vary in number and length to the point where the upper section 8 is substantially disposed of entirely. It has been found by actual experiment, however, that the design illustrated herein is preferable and achieves the results desired.

Changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of parts from those disclosed herein Without in any way departing from the spirit of the invention or sacrificing any of the attendant advantages thereof, provided, however, that such changes fall within the scope of the claims appended hereto.

The invention is hereby claimed as follows:

1. An air diffuser for conditioning a room, comprising a substantially rectangular frame, oppositely disposed and spaced groups of longitudinally arcuate fins adjacent the ends of said frame, the arcuate fins in each group having a common center of curvature and fanning radially outwardly therefrom, another group of substantially straight fins occupying a portion of the space between the upper terminal ends of said groups of arcuate fins, all of the fins in each group being substantially parallel to each other and each fin in each group being spaced from the other to form an unobstructed passage between adjacent fins, the fins in said oppositely disposed groups extending rearwardly from the face of said frame and inwardly toward the center thereof and extending at such an angle with respect to the plane of the frame that the perpendicular distance between adjacent fins is less than the width of a fin, and the substantially straight This is also illusfins extending rearwardly and downwardly, whereby air passing outwardly between the fins of each group will blend and form an air curtain blanketing the wall in which the diffuser is mounted.

2. An air diffuser for conditioning a room, comprisin g a substantially rectangular frame, oppositely disposed and spaced groups of longitudinally arcuate fins adjacent the ends of said frame, the arcuate fins in each group having a common center of curvature andfanning radially outwardly therefrom and some of said fins in each group terminating at their lower ends at the lower marginal edge of 'said frame, another group of substantially straight fins occupying a portion of the space between the upper terminal ends of said groups of arcuate fins, all of the fins in each group being substantially parallel to each other and each fin in each group being spaced from the other'to form an unobstructedpassage between adjacent fins, the fins in said oppositely disposed groups extending rearwardly from the face of said frame and inwardly toward the center thereof and extending at such an angle with respect to the plane of the frame that the perpendicular distance between adjacent fins is less than the width of a fin, and the substantially straight fins extending rearwardly and downwardly, whereby air passing outwardly between the fins of each group will blend and form an air curtain blanketing the wall in which the diffuser is mounted.

3. An air diffuser for conditioning a room, comprising a substantially rectangular frame, oppositely disposed and spaced groups of longitudinally arcuate fins adjacent the ends of said frame, the arcuate fins in each group having a common center of curvature and fanning radially outwardly therefrom and some of said fins in each group terminating at their upper ends at the upper marginal edge of said frame, another group of substantially straight fins occupying a portion of the space between the upper terminal ends of said groups of arcuate fins, all of the fins in each group being substantially parallel to each other and each fin in each group being spaced from the other to form an unobstructed passage between adjacent fins, the fins in said oppositely disposed groups extending rearwardly from the face of said frame and inwardly toward the center thereof and extending at such an angle wth respect to the plane of the frame that the perpendicular distance between adjacent fins is less than the width of a fin, and the substantially straight fins extending rearwardly and downwardly, whereby air passing outwardly between the fins of each group will blend and form an air curtain blanketing the wall in which the diffuser is mounted.

4. An air diffuser for conditioning a room, comprising a substantially rectangular frame, oppositely disposed and spaced groups of longitudinally arcuate fins adjacent the ends of said frame, the arcuate fins in each group having a common center of curvature and fanning radially outwardly therefrom and some of said fins in each group terminating at their lower ends at the lower marginal edge of said frame and at their upper ends at the upper marginal edge of said frame, another group of substantially straight fins occupying a portion of the space between the upper terminal ends of said groups of arcuate fins, all of the fins in each group being substantially parallel to each other and each fin in each group being spaced from the other to form an unobstructed passage between adjacent fins, the fins in said oppositely disposed groups extending rearwardly from the face of said frame and inwardly toward the center thereof and extending at such an angle with respect to the plane of the frame that the perpendicular distance between adjacent fins is less than the width of a fin, and the substantially straight fins extending rearwardly and downwardly, whereby air passing outwardly between the fins of each group will blend and form an air curtain blanketing the wall in which the diffuser is mounted.

5. An air diffuser for conditioning a room, compris- '7 ing asubstantially rectangular frame, oppositely disposed and spaced groups of longitudinally arcuate .fins adjacent the ends of'said frame,.the arcuate fins in each group having a common center of curvature and fanning ra dially outwardly therefrom and some said fins in each group terminating at their lower ends at the lower marginal edge of said frame and at their upper ends at the upper marginal edge of said frame, another group of substantially straight fins occupying a portion of the base between the upper terminal ends of said groups of 10 disposed groups extending rearwardly from the face of 15 said frame and inwardly toward the center thereof and extending at such an angle with respect to the plane of the frame that the perpendicular distance between adjacent fins is less than the width of a fin, and the substantially straightfins extending rearwardly and downwardly, and a further group of substantially straight fins in the lower portion of said frame extending rearwardly and upwardly, whereby air passing outwardly between the fins of each group will blend and form an air'curtain blanketing the wall in which the diffuser is mounted.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS De R00 June 3, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2021086 *Mar 20, 1934Nov 12, 1935Oskamp Howard EAir diffuser
US2282946 *Feb 12, 1940May 12, 1942Hart & Cooley Mfg CompanyRegister
US2341439 *May 6, 1942Feb 8, 1944Greenlaw Alfred LGrill
US2381345 *Jun 5, 1942Aug 7, 1945Greenlaw Alfred LGrill
US2598763 *May 16, 1949Jun 3, 1952Hart & Cooley Mfg CoGrille
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2947237 *Mar 4, 1957Aug 2, 1960O'day Cortland NAir diffusers
US2955525 *Oct 15, 1956Oct 11, 1960Auer Register CompanyAir register
US3030872 *Apr 20, 1959Apr 24, 1962Chrysler CorpAir outlet grille
US3045580 *Aug 4, 1959Jul 24, 1962Practical Tool & Engineering CAdjustable register for air flow
US3096705 *Apr 9, 1959Jul 9, 1963Mc Graw Edison CoLouver structure
US3170387 *Dec 17, 1962Feb 23, 1965Felter John VDiffusers
US4561422 *Nov 27, 1984Dec 31, 1985Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaHot air type heater
US4815934 *Mar 31, 1987Mar 28, 1989Hart & Cooley, Inc.Air deflector arrangement
US4887522 *Apr 20, 1988Dec 19, 1989Kabushiki Kaisha KyoritsuAir-conditioning apparatus
US4991496 *Aug 14, 1989Feb 12, 1991Kabushiki Kaisha KyoritsuAir-conditioning duct apparatus with twistable duct vanes
US8002013 *Apr 3, 2008Aug 23, 2011Airvisor Inc.Ceiling vent diffuser
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/310
International ClassificationF24F13/075, F24F13/06
Cooperative ClassificationF24F13/075
European ClassificationF24F13/075