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Publication numberUS2785409 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1957
Filing dateAug 17, 1953
Priority dateAug 17, 1953
Publication numberUS 2785409 A, US 2785409A, US-A-2785409, US2785409 A, US2785409A
InventorsLackey William E
Original AssigneeMary Alice Lackey
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carpenter's and mechanic's apron
US 2785409 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 19, 1957 w. E. I AcKEY CARPENTER'SANDMECHANIC'S APRoN Filed Aug. 17, 1953 MUA/w E LAC/ 5);

IN VEN TOR.

TTOQNEY.

United CARPENTERS AND MECHANIEC@ APRN William E. Lackey, Culver City, Calif., assigner, by decree of distribution, to Mary Alice Lachey My invention relates to aprons and more specifically to an apron peculiarly adaptable for use by workmen, such as carpenters and mechanics, and whereby they are enabled to carry a variety of articles, such as nails, tools and other relatively heavy objects and which may be needed or required While performing their normal duties as such workmen.

Heretofore, carpenters and mechanics aprons have had many disadvantages while in use, such as for example, they have been of considerable length and were also secured at their lower ends to the workmans cloth ing or around his legs; that when loaded with tools and the like, they have unduly restricted the freedom of movement of the worker, particularly when the wearer suddenly bends over to the front, at which movement the contents of the pockets were many times spilled or dumped out of such pockets; and they have materially interfered with the ease and comfort of the wearer when he assumes a squatting position.

It is the general object of my invention to provide a novel apron which will be substantially free or devoid of the disadvantages above referred to.

An object of my invention is to provide a novel Workmans apron which is so constructed and arranged that it will afford the wearer a maximum of freedom of movement, and whereby likelihood of the articles carried by the apron being accidentally displaced therefrom is reduced to a minimum.

Another object is to provide a novel apron for workmen which will adord maximum comfort and a minimum of constraint to the wearer when he assumes a squatting position.

A further object is to provide a novel workmans apron with a plurality of pockets or carrying articles, and whereby the pockets are so arranged and constructed to provide additional pockets.

The invention resides in the parts and combination and arrangement of the parts as more fully hereinafter described in detail in the accompanying specification and dened in the claims.

Other objects, advantages and features of invention may appear from the accompanying drawing, the subjoined detail description, and the appended claims.

The accompanying drawing illustrates the invention in a form I at present deem preferable.

Figure 1 is a front elevational view, slightly in perspective, showing a carpenters apron constructed in accordance with my invention.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken on line 2-2, Fig. l, and showing in edge elevation an article carried in one of the pockets.

The numeral indicates a belt which may be of webbing, as shown, or of any other material that may be adjusted as to length by the buckle means 11, preferably of the quick detachable type. The belt 10 is of suitable width for supporting weights without imposing any constraint on the movements of the wearer.

Depending from the belt 1() are a plurality of article Frater @arent 2,785,409 Patented Mar. 19, 1957 carrying members 12a, 12b that form a two-part apron member 12. The members 12a and 12b are substantially identical in construction, in so far as my invention is concerned, and a description of one will suffice for the other, and like numerals may be equally employed for either member. The apparent differences between members 12a and 12b is the relative size of the front pocket or pouch 17; the type and character of the auxiliary tool supports A and B forming no part of this invention.

A relatively large back pocket or rear pouch 13 is formed preferably from a single piece or strip of leather C, the rear wall 13 forming pocket 13 being secured along its upper and free ends 13 to the belt 1t) by any suitable leather rivets 14. The strip of leather C is folded upon itself as at 31 to form the front wall 15 of pocket 13 and such front wall 15 extends upwardly in front of, and spaced from, the rear wall 13 to a point below the free end 13 where it is turned forwardly or outwardly from the front wall 15. The vertically extending free side edges 32, 33 of the wall members 13 and 15 are secured together in any suitable manner as by the double row of stitching 34. The oblique lower corners 3S of the wall members 13 and 1S forming the pocket 13 being additionally connected together by a plurality of leather rivets 16.

The outturned and downturned edge 36 of front wall member 15 is secured to the forward surface of wall 15 by a row of stitching 37. p

The front member 15 is wider than the rear wall member 13 so that when such members are secured together with the side edges thereof in alignment the front wall member 15 will bow outwardly and provide an open mouthed pocket 13 for easy insertion of the hand in the placement of articles within or the removal of articles from the pocket 13.

To the front wall ofeach back pouch 13 is secured a front pocket or pouch 17 that is preferably formed from a single piece or strip of leather that is folded upon itself intermediate its ends as at 38, then infolding the side edges d of the strip and securing them together by stitching 39. The lower corners of pouch 17 are secured to the front wall 15 by rivets 19; the upper end of rear or back wall 1S of pouch 17 is inserted underneath the downturned edge 36 before it is stitched to the outside of front wall 15. The upper corners of the rear wall 18 of pouch 17 are secured to the front wall 15 by rivets 19'. The front wall 4l of front pouch 1'7 extends upwardly in front of, and spaced from, the rear wall 18 to a point just below the edge 36 where it is turned outwardly and downwardly and then secured to the front wall 41 as by stitching 4Z in a manner analogous to the edge 36.

The upper corners of the front wall 41 of front pouch 17 are preferably secured by rivets 43 to the inturned side edges d. p

The front wall member 41 of pouch 17 is wider than the rear wall member 18 thereof so that when such members il and 13 are secured together by the stitching 39 with the side edges thereof in alignment the front wall member 41 will bow outwardly and provide an open mouthed pocket or pouch 17 for easy insertion and removal of articles into and from the pouch 17.

lt will be apparent from the foregoing that the back wall 13 of pouch 17 is free from the front. wall 15 except for its line of securement along the top of the rear wall 13 to the upper edge 36, and fo-r its securement at the lower corners thereof by the rivets 19; and thereby forms another pouch or chamber 3Q `intermediate the front wall 15 of the large pouch 13 and the rear wall 1S of the smaller pouch 17, and int-o which chamber 30 the wearer may carry a large tape measure 21, and which as indicated in Figs. l and 2 'may be a standard 50 foot tape measure, and a like tape measure may also be accommodated in the pouch 311 that is formed between the rear pouch 13 and front pouch 17 on the member 12b.

The lower portion of the round case of the tape 21. may nestle in the pocket or pouch 30 between the rivets 19 as the folded edge 38 is spaced at 44 from the front wall member 1S Iof rear pouch 13, except at the point of. counectionthereto by the rivets 19.

The article carrying members 12a and 12b are suspended from .belt with their inner side edges 45m substantial alignment with 1each other when the belt it? is laid in a `horizontal position. (The space between edges 45' as shown in Fig. 1 is for purposes of more clarity.) The carrying members and Vpouches thereon normally hang vertically from the belt 1t), Vand when the wearer lbends over forwardly the pouches willswing forward in a vertically depending position, and likelihood of artic-les carried thereby from falling therefrom, is reduced to a minimum. Also, when the wearer moves to a squatting position, the members 12a and 12b 'are free to slide along, and the lower edges thereof move outwardly, on the upper lsurface of the thighs 4of the wearer until such outward movement is arrested by a strap 22 connecting the lower and inner edges or corners of said members 12a and 12b. The strap 22 will normallyassume an outwardly looped .position when the apron is hanging vertically from the belt 10.

The front top edge of wall 41 of pocket 17 being downturned forms a welt which when the side edges d Vare inturned and stitched at 39 will tend to normally hold said front edge in a bowed Aposition so that the mouth of pocket 17 is normally open.

I claim:

1. A carpenters and mechanics'apron comprising: a =belt member; a two part apron member, each part having a back pouch with its back wall supported by its upper margin being connected to said belt; a front pouch with its back` wall supported by its upper margin from the upper portion of the front wall of the back pouch, and secured at its lower corners to the front wall of the yback pouch; the space between the front wall of the back pouch and the back wall ofthe front pouch providing a chamber intermediate the back and front pouch-es.

2. A carpenters and mechanics apron comprising: a belt member; a two part apron member, each part being secured along its upper margin to said belt, the'inner edges of each member being unattached and adapted to spread apart when the wearer assumes a squatting position; article retaining means mounted on each apron part; and means` connected to the lower inner corners of each part to permit and limit the spreading movement of said parts.

3. A carpenters and mechanics apron as set forth in claim 1, and in which in addition includes a flexible strap connecting the lower-corners of the apron parts and to permit and limit movement of 'each part member away from'each other.

4. A carpenters and mechanics apron comprising: a

belt member; a two part apron member, each part beingl secured along its upper margin to said belt, and being separable from each other so as to spread apart when the wearer assumes a squatting position; each apron part forming a back pouch, the back wall of said pouch being supported by its upper margin being connected to said belt; a front pouch having back wall supported by its upper margin from the upper portion of the front wall of the back pouch, and secured at each of its lower corners to the front wall of the back pouch, and forming a space between the front wall of the back pouch and the back wall of the front pouch thereby providing a chamber intermediate the back and front pouches; and means connected. to the lower inner corners of each part to limit the spreading movement of said parts.

5. An article of manufacture comprising an apron member including ya back member folded upon itself and having its side edges secured together to form `a rear pocket member; a front member folded upon itself and having its side edges inturned and secured together to form a front pocket member; the upper edge of the front wall of the rear pocket member being outwardly folded upon itself; the upper edge of the rear wall of the front pocket member being inserted underneaththe folded over upper edge `of the front wall of the rear pocket member; means securing the folded over top edge of the front wall of the rear pocket member and the top edge of the rear wall of the front pocket member together; the front wall of the front pocket member being wider than the rear wall thereof and having its top edge folded upon itself Y to form a welt that normally holds the mouth of the front pocket member in an open position; means securing thel lower corners of the front pocket member to the frontl wall of the rear pocket member to form an open sided chamber between the front and rear pocket members; and belt means secured to the upper edge of the rearwall of the rear pocket member. Y

6. A carpenters and mechanics apron comprising: a- `belt member; a two part apron member, eachpart having i a back pouch formed from a single piece of-material folded upon itself intermediate its ends and with-its back wall supported by its upper margin being connected to said belt; a front pouch formed from a single piece ofmaterial folded upon itself intermediate its ends and with its back wall supported by its upper margin from the upper portion of the front wall of the back pouch, and secured at its lower corners to the front wall of the back pouch, the space between the front wall of the back pouch and the back wall of the front pouch providing a chamber intermediate the back and front pouches.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNlTED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US729565 *Oct 24, 1901Jun 2, 1903Edgar M BondIceman's apron.
US986273 *Nov 3, 1910Mar 7, 1911Arthur EloesserOveralls.
US1411562 *Nov 11, 1920Apr 4, 1922Christian Raleigh JApron
US1543584 *Jul 25, 1925Jun 23, 1925 op greenville
US2263538 *Sep 16, 1939Nov 18, 1941Thomas C StewartCarpenter's and mechanic's apron
US2592087 *Sep 20, 1948Apr 8, 1952Wallace Nancy KClothespin holder of apron type
US2614260 *Jan 27, 1950Oct 21, 1952Abraham LipshitzMultiple pocket panel construction
US2651039 *Feb 26, 1952Sep 8, 1953TonkensUnitary bib and tissue dispenser
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2846685 *Dec 3, 1956Aug 12, 1958Ehrich Walter LDetachable nail and small tool apron
US2882964 *Sep 17, 1956Apr 21, 1959Nathaniel R WatkinDoghouse door or the like
US2922165 *Oct 7, 1957Jan 26, 1960Krawczyk Joseph SCarpenters' aprons
US3095576 *May 24, 1962Jul 2, 1963Jenter Ellsworth WApron for use when treating small pigs
US5107545 *Jan 3, 1991Apr 28, 1992Thomas PotterFisherman's fly tying apron
US5943696 *Nov 12, 1997Aug 31, 1999Walker; Joseph W.Painter's garment
US7114190 *Sep 7, 2004Oct 3, 2006Lisa NajarianProtective clothing article
US7219373 *Sep 14, 2004May 22, 2007Mcnamara ChristopherReusable carrier with expandable, disposable insert
US7636949 *Jan 26, 2009Dec 29, 2009Shooshan Mary ECraft apron
US7854020 *Jun 1, 2008Dec 21, 2010Patricia Anne EhrlickmanSafety drain holding system
US20060048260 *Sep 7, 2004Mar 9, 2006Lisa NajarianProtective clothing article
US20060053523 *Sep 14, 2004Mar 16, 2006Mcnamara ChristopherReusable carrier with expandable, disposable insert
US20080301863 *Jun 6, 2008Dec 11, 2008Matthew Paul GoffElectrician's vest
US20090089913 *Jun 1, 2008Apr 9, 2009Patricia Anne EhrlickmanSafety drain holding system
US20120167269 *Dec 31, 2010Jul 5, 2012Nicole HernandezApron for storing heated hair care appliances
WO1988003461A1 *Nov 6, 1986May 19, 1988Ingmar GranlindTool belt
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/51
International ClassificationA41D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41D13/0012
European ClassificationA41D13/00P