Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2785480 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1957
Filing dateDec 2, 1955
Priority dateDec 2, 1955
Publication numberUS 2785480 A, US 2785480A, US-A-2785480, US2785480 A, US2785480A
InventorsFred Maccarone
Original AssigneeFred Maccarone
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe construction
US 2785480 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 19, 1957 F. MAccARoNE 2,785,480

sHoE CONSTRUCTION original med Feb. s, 1955 s sheets-sheet 1 Fig, 2

INVENToR. FRED MACCARONE ATTORNEYS March 19, 1957 Original Filed Feb. 3, 1955 F. MccARoNE 2,785,480

SHOE CONSTRUCTION i 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fig. 4

2O I8 2O IN V EN TOR. FRED MACCARONE BY @Wwwqmrw ATTORNEYS March 19, 1957 F. MAccARoNE 2,785,480

SHOE CONSTRUCTION Original Filed Feb. 3, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. FRED MACCARONE ATTOR N EYS United rates SHOE CONSTRUCTION Fred Maccarone, Brooklyn, N. Y,

Application December 2, 1955, Serial No. 550,600

10 Claims. (Cl. S6-2.5)

This invention relates to shoemaking and in particular to a new and improved construction resulting in a shoe of improved fit and comfort. This is a division of my copending application Ser. No. 485,877, tiled February 3, 1955 now Patent No. 2,729,900, dated January 10, 1956.

Shoe manufacturers have long sought a means of eliminating the unsightly and uncomfortable relative motion between the rear ends of shoes and the heels of the wearer so often observed during that portion of the stride in which the weight moves from the rear to the forward part of the foot. Slipping is experienced in varying degrees with all types of shoes, but is most pronounced with womens shoes of open heel construction. Thus far all attempts to eliminate the slipping have provide to oe unsatisfactory.

The primary object of this invention, therefore, is to eliminate slipping at the heel end of shoes.

Another important object of this invention is to provide a self-contained prefabricated unit which may be introduced into a shoe during or after manufacture, to accomplish the primary object and increase the wearers comfort.

A further object of this invention is to provide a resilient arch support which gently urges the foot against the upper.

To accomplish these and other objects, l provide as a principal feature of this invention an elongated pivotally mounted leaf spring secured in the shank portion of the shoe to exert a mild spring action causing the shoe to follow the heel of the wearer.

Still another important feature of the invention is the provision of a cushion between the insole and sock lining of the shoe overlyingr the spring and serving to enhance the general comfort of the foot, to urge the foot against the shoe upper, and to prevent the spring from exerting a direct force upon the sock lining which would otherwise tend to tear the lining from the insole.

A further feature of this invention is the provision of a slash or cut-out in the sock lining which permits the cushion beneath the lining to move upwardly under the inliuence of the spring without tearing the lining from the insole.

These and other objects and feaures of my invention. together with incident advantages, will be more readily understood and appreciated from a reading of the following detailed description of two embodiments thereof, selected for purposes of illustration and shown in the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. l is a plan view of a combination sock lining and cushion constructed in accordance with the invention,

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the combination illustrated in Fig. l,

Fig. 3 is a bottom view of the combination shown in Figs. 1 and 2,

Fig. 4 is a detailed view in perspective of a spring constructed in accordance with this invention,

` Fig. 5 is a fragmentary plan view of an insole and the 2,785,480 Patented Mar. 19, 1957 23 spring, illustrating one means of assembly the two elements in accordance with my invention,

Fig. 6 is a view in longitudinal cross section through a finished shoe incorporating my invention,

Fig. 7 is a plan view of a combination sock lining,V

cushion, and spring constructed in accordance with this invention,

Fig. 8 is a View in longitudinal cross-section of the combination shown in Fig. 7,

Fig. 9 is a View in longitudinal cross-section of a shoe illustrating the manner in which the combination lining, cushion, and spring may be incorporated into a 'finished shoe,

Fig. 10 is a plan view of a sock lining cut. in accordance with my invention, and

Fig. l1 is a longitudinal sectional view of another combination sock lining, cushion and spring constructed in accordance with my invention and incorporating the sock lining illustrated in Fig. l0.

The nature of the invention illustrated in Figs. l-6 may be related most advantageously by separately describing its two major features, namely, the combination sock lining and cushion shown in Fig. l and the spring and insole viewed in Fig. 5.

Proceeding with the description of the novel combination illustrated in Fig. l, a sock lining l@ of conventional configuration and constructed of any standard material is provided with a cut-out i2 longitudinally disposed at the shank. The cut-out fr?. roughly conforms to the overall shape of the sock lining and extends throughout the length of the shank portion. A cushion 14 is secured to the underside of the lining about the margin of the cut-out by stitching i3 and provides a soft and resilient pad for the arch of the foot. The cushion may be made of foam rubber or any other equivalent material and although the cushion has been illustrated and described as being sewed to the socl; lining, it is to be understood that it may be secured thereto by cement or other means. A second foam rubber pad 16 illustrated in Figs. Z and 3 is cemented to the bottom of the cushion 14 and the sock lining,l extending beyond the margins of the cut-out. The second cushion or pad serves to crowd the first cushion through the slashing in the lining. Although two cushions have been illustrated and described, it is appreciated that a single heavier pad may be substituted with substantially the same results.

The spring illustrated in Fig. 4 which urges the rear part of the shoe to follow the heel of the foot will now be described. The spring 18 comprises a strip or leaf of flat resilient metal or synthetic material and is assembled in the finished shoe in a position to pivot about the shank portion. Great freedom is afforded in the selection of the spring conguration, but it has been found that a slight curvature in its body enhances its operation. As is clearly evidenced in the perspecive View of the device, its terminal portions 2li may be turned gently upward as suggested, and the extreme ends may be rounded to present to the foam rubber pad a smooth surface free of sharp edges.

In Fig. 6 is shown a finished shoe including an insole 22, a molded shank piece 28, an outsole 30, a heel 3o, and an upper comprising a vamp 32 and a heel strap 34. The insole 22 is provided at the center of the shank with a pair of closely spaced transverse slits 2id to form a thin strap 26. After the shoe has been made, the spring 18 is slipped under the strap 26 in position for pivotal motion about that point. The sock lining is then cemented to the insole in the customary manner with the foam rubber cushion overlying the spring. T he ends of cut-out 12 extend beyond the terminal portions of the spring and its smooth rounded surfaces will exert a force against the resilient foam rubber cushion when the spring pivots about its fulcrurn. If the spring acted directly on the sock lining, there would be an undesirable tendency to separate the lining from the insole.

When the shoe is placed upon the foot, the foam rubber cushion and the spring gently urge the top of the foot upwardly against the upper members. As the wearers weight is brought forward from the rearward portion to the forward portion of the shoe, the spring 13 will pivot at the shank. The downward thrust on the forward end of spring i3 will cause upward movement of the rear end of the spring and thus lift' the foot into tighter engagement with the heel strap 34. At the same time the spring exerts a mild lifting force against the sock lining through the cushion. lt will be appreciated that this action will minimize the unsightly and uncomfortable slipping described in the introductory paragraphs of the specication.

The embodiment of this invention shown in Figs. 7-9 achieves all of the advantages of the construction first described, and in addition illustrates the manner in which they may introduced into existing shoes of conventional construction. ln Figs. 7 and 8, I show the manner in which this is accomplished. The structure therein illustrated comprises a combination sock lining, spring, yand resilient cushion made as a single unit. -ln detail, the soci. lining i4 is provided with an aperture 46 cut longitudinally in its shank portion, and a foam rubber cushion is stitched to it about the margin of the aperture as suggested at A second foam rubber cushion 5d is cemented to the bottom of the first cushion in the manner described in 'the preceding embodiment, but a pocket is provided between the two for receiving the spring Si). ln actual construction, the spring may be placed on the surface of the inverted sock lining after the first cushion has been stitched in position. Then the second cushion may be cemented to the unit as shown. The cavity should be no larger than the spring to prevent relative shifting of the spring and the sock lining.

it will be noted that the spring illustrated in Figs. 7 and S has the same curvature as the spring shown in the preceding embodiment. However, the spring is provided with spatulate ends 52 to present a smooth rounded surface for the cushion 4S. This general configuration will obviously insure complete comfort for the wearer. lt is also revealed in Fig. 7 that the length of the cut-out in the sock lining exceeds the length of the spring, thus preventing any direct application of force by the spring against the lining. been fully specified in connection with the embodiment previously described.

From the foregoing description of an alternative form of the invention, it will be appreciated that the combinationv sock lining, spring and cushion may be sold separately, and the retailer by selecting the proper size may introduce the unit into shoes at the time of sale. The manner in which this is effected is shown in Fig. 9. The unit may be cemented to the insole of any conventional shoe in the same manner as an ordinary sock lining. lf the proper size is selected, the spring will lie in the proper position over the shank. The foam rubber pad Sri will be compressed at its midsection by the spring at the point where the spring pivots on the insole. Because the spring is securely held in its pocket between the cushions it will remain in the longitudinal position illustrated, but pivotal motion of the spring is permitted due to the compressibility of the cushions. As the weight of the wearer is transferred from the rear portion to the front portion of the foot, the spring will pivot exerting a mild spring action causing the rear part of the shoe to follow the heel of the foot, eliminating the undesirable slipping discussed above.

The embodiment' of my invention illustrated in Figs. 10

and 11 is an improvement on the embodiment shown in v The advantages of this feature have "Figs, 7-9. Additional strength is afforded -that embodiment by utilizing the portion of the sock lining removed to form the aperture 46. In detail, the sock lining 60 shown in Fig. l0 is cut along the line 62 to form a flap 64. By lowering the flap from the plane of the sock lining an aperture is formed similar to cut-outs in the other embodiments.

A cushion 66 having a slot' 68 is stitched to the sock lining and lls the aperture. The ap 64 is drawn downwardly through the slot 63 and is secured to the lower surface of the cushion by cement or other suitable means. A second cushion 54 is attached to the bottom of the cushion 66 and defines a pocket for the spring 50 in the same manner as in the embodiment of Figs. 7-9. However, spring 50 no longer exerts a force directly on the cushion `filling the aperture, but instead, bears against the flap 64 which preventsv the spatulate ends 52 of the spring from cutting the cushion.

None of the ladvantages stated above are lost by em ploying this form. The resiliency of the cushion and the width of the aperture prevent the spring from tearing the sock lining from the insole. In addition, the cushion is reinforced to give it longer life. Moreover, the portion oi' the sock lining wasted in the preceding embodiments is now employed for a useful purpose.

Many other advantages not alluded to in the preceding description are derived by employing the construction disclosed in this specification. For example, by introducing into a shoe otherwise too large the units illustrated in Figs. 7 and ll, a comfortable iit may be obtained by virtue of the lifting action applied to the foot urging it against the upper. Rubbing of the foot against the upper will be eliminated. Moreover, the additional arch support alforded by the spring will decrease fatigue so often encountered with high heel shoes.

Those skilled in shoemaking will readily appreciate that numerous variations in the details of the illustrated and described embodiments may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention. Therefore, it is not intended that the scope of the invention be limited to the embodiments of the invention shown and described, but only by the appended claims and their equivalents.

What l claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

l. A shoe comprising an insole, an outsole secured to the insole, an elongated leaf spring longitudinally disposed above the insole and pivotally movable about the shank portion of the insole, a sock lining secured to the insole having an aperture in its shank portion, said aper ture being disposed over and exceeding the length of the leaf spring, and cushioning means secured to the sock lining filling the aperture and overlying the spring.

2. A shoe comprising an insole, an outsole secured to the insole, a leaf spring longitudinally disposed above the insole and pivotally movable about its central portion on the shank portion of the insole, a sock lining secured to the insole, and cushioning means disposed between said insole and said soclt lining and overlying the spring.

3. A shoe comprising an insole, an outsole secured to the insole, a pair of slits cut transversely through the insole at its shank portion, a leaf spring passing through said slits and pivc-tally movable about its central portion on the shank portion of the insole, a sock lining secured to the insole, and a cushion member secured to the lower surface of said soci: lining and overlying said spring member.

4. A shoe comprising an insole, an outside secured to the insole, a sock lining secured to the insole and having a longitudinal aperture in its shank portion, a first cushion member secured to the underside of the insole and covering the aperture, a second cushion member disposed between the first cushion member and the insole, and a leaf spring longitudinally disposed between said cushion members and pivotally movable about its central portion on the Shank portieri of the insole.

avenants S. A shoe comprising an insole, an outsole secured to the insole, an elongated spring disposed above the shank portion of the insole and pivotally movable about its central portion on said shank portion, a sock lining Secured to the insole and having an elongated aperture overlying the spring, the ends of the aperture extending beyond the ends of the spring and exceeding the width of the spring, and a cushion member stitched to the lower surface of the sock lining and filling the aperture.

6. A shoe comprising an insole, an outsole secured to the insole, a pair of closely spaced slits cut in the shank portion of the insole defining a narrow transverse strap across said shank portion, an elongated leaf spring longitudinally disposed on said insole with its central portion beneath said strap, a sock lining secured to the insole having an elongated aperture in its shank portion over- 4lying the full length of the spring, the portions of the aperture overlying the ends of the spring exceeding the Width of the ends, and a cushion member secured to the underside of the sock lining and filling the aperture.

7. A shoe comprising an insole, an outsole secured to the insole, an elongated leaf spring longitudinally disposed above the insole and pivotally movable about the shank portion of the insole, a sock lining secured to the insole and having a longitudinal flap cut in its shank portion, the lap being disposed over and exceeding the length of the leaf spring, and a cushion secured to the underside of the sock lining and overlying the ap forming a cushion iilled aperture in the sock lining.

8. In combination, a sock lining, an elongated cushion member secured to the underside and extending over the full length of the shank portion of the sock lining, a slot cut in the cushion adjacent the heel of the sock lining, an elongated iiap cut longitudinally in the shank portion of the sock lining and drawn through the slot in the cushion, said flap being secured to the underside of the cushion, a second cushion secured to the underside of the iirst cushion and delining a pocket between the cushions, and a leaf spring longitudinally disposed in the pocket and abutting the lower surface of the ap.

9. In combination a sock lining, an elongated cushion longitudinally secured to the shank portion of the sock lining, a flap cut in the shank portion of the sock lining and secured to the lower surface of the cushion, and a leaf spring secured longitudinally to the lower surface of the flap.

l0. In combination, a sock lining, an elongated flap cut in the sock lining forming an elongated aperture longitudinally disposed in the shank portion of the sock lining, and a cushion member secured to the lower surface of the shank portion of the sock vlining and lling the aperture, said ap cut in the sock lining being secured to the lower surface of the cushion member.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2959875 *Nov 13, 1957Nov 15, 1960Frese Jr Albert CSlip-proof sock lining for shoes
US3314092 *Jul 3, 1963Apr 18, 1967Jaime PujolShoemaking process
US3522668 *Apr 1, 1968Aug 4, 1970Franz FeslSports boot,especially ski boot
US3601908 *May 15, 1969Aug 31, 1971Francis M GilkersonMolded insole
US4866860 *Jul 25, 1988Sep 19, 1989Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Metatarsal head shoe cushion construction
US5416989 *Nov 22, 1993May 23, 1995Brown Group, Inc.Shoe with a shank having a cushion therein
US5852887 *Aug 14, 1997Dec 29, 1998Converse Inc.Shoe with lateral support member
US8453347 *Jul 10, 2008Jun 4, 2013Sea Shell Co., Ltd.Footwear sole insert and footwear
US8479405Sep 30, 2011Jul 9, 2013Marie SmirmanMeasurement system for varus/valgus angles in feet
US8523194Apr 14, 2010Sep 3, 2013Marie SmirmanForefoot wedge insert for footwear
US20100132222 *Jul 10, 2008Jun 3, 2010Sea Shell Co., Ltd.Footwear Sole Insert and Footwear
US20100263230 *Oct 21, 2010Marie SmirmanInsert for rockered foot bed of footwear
US20100263231 *Apr 14, 2010Oct 21, 2010Marie SmirmanForefoot wedge insert for footwear
US20100263232 *Oct 21, 2010Marie SmirmanMoldable arch support for footwear
USD383894Dec 22, 1995Sep 23, 1997Schering-Plough Healthcare Products, Inc.Insole
DE1096802B *Sep 18, 1957Jan 5, 1961Bama Werk Curt BaumannEinlegestueck aus Schaumstoff zum Einkleben in Schuhwerk
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/91, 36/58.5, 36/43, 36/76.00R, 36/44, 36/182
International ClassificationA43B13/38
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/38
European ClassificationA43B13/38