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Publication numberUS2785643 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1957
Filing dateFeb 9, 1954
Priority dateFeb 9, 1954
Publication numberUS 2785643 A, US 2785643A, US-A-2785643, US2785643 A, US2785643A
InventorsAllister Mitchell Donald
Original AssigneeAllister Mitchell Donald
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tufting machine
US 2785643 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 19, 1957 D. A. MITCHELL TUFTING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Shee't 1 Filed 'Feb. 9. 1954 .Jllllllll- INVENTOR. DONALD A. M \TCHELL.

March 19, 1957 D. A. MITCHELL TUFTING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 9, 1954 INVENTOR.

DONALD A.MITCHELL BY flwz w Fig.

March 19, 1957 D. A. MITCHELL 2,785,643

TUFTING MACHINE Filed Feb. 9, 1954 6 She'ets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. DONALD A.M\TCHELL March 19, 1957 D. A. MITCHELL 2,735,643

I TUFTING MACHINE Filed Feb. 9, 1954 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 March 19, 1957 D. A. MITCHELL 2,785,643

TUFTING MACHINE Filed Feb. 9, 1954 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 zzvmvrox DONALD AMwcn-aau.

p'The present invention relates to the fabrication of carpet, rug or pile fabrics and more particularly to a .tufting mechanism for forming a design or insignia as an embellishment to a completed carpet or rug.

7 Brior mechanisms functioning for such a purpose in- -clude a sewing head operating a yarn needle and associated book by which the yarn is caused to traverse the carpet fabric to form a tuft design according to a selected pattern. The needle is caused to move step by step across the back of the carpet by hand and as the mecha' nism is relatively heavy the operators have great difiimissed by the needle. Furthermore since both the needle and the hook are rigidly mounted, any angular turning of the needle head is resisted because either the needle 'or'the hook or both may be in the fabric when a turn is to be made to follow the pattern. As a result of this there is damage to the carpet caused by the lateral forcing of the hook or needle and in many instances a sever- .ing of the carpet yarn. Also in such prior devices there is no provision to release tension upon the yarn as it is fed by the needle, and even if the pull does not break the fed yarn there is a marked difference in the length of thetufts and a resulting imperfection in the design.

7 Furthermore in prior mechanisms the single, hollow needle is impractical for heavy carpet as there is no underneath support while the needle pierces the carpet, nor can such a needle carry enough yarn to operate througha stiff hacked or presized carpet such as rubber or starch.

I Also in conventional tufting machines when the pile yarn goes through the back and is caught by a synchronized looper, the operator has to turn the carpet instead of guiding the needle, so such mechanisms are useless where large rugs or carpets are the kind with which the mechanism is to be used.

4 It is an object of the present invention to provide a tuftingmechanism which overcomes the objections and disadvantages of these prior machines.

Another object of the invention is to provide a yarn feeding needle which is self-adjusting laterally to compensate for angle swing of its head.

Another object is to provide a novel movable support acting against the face of the carpet or rug in opposition to the entering of the needle from the back of the car- P mg- Another object is to provide means for preventing either a needle or its associated hook while in the carpet from obstructing angular turning of the yarn head. Another object is to provide a mounting for a tufting yarn hook which is universal in operation. I

Another object is to provide a swingable carriage in association with a power driven unit affording easy manual control for tufting operation. QAffurther' object is to provide a tufting mechanism for multiple'operation whereby a single operator can aUnitfid States Patent.

fculty in properly guiding the needle and as a consequence sequential tuft arrangement is interrupted by spaces ice simultaneously apply a plurality of like designs to the same carpet or to a number of rugs. A still further object is to provide an improved mechanism for piercing a fabric backing to form tufts on the fabric face according to a predetermined pattern and in operation is not limited to the size or weight of the material.

In the accompanying drawings, Figures 1 to 5 show the needle and associated hook in the several steps of forming a tuft through a piece of material; Figure 6 represents a front elevation of the hook mounting showing the hook as entering the needle; Figure 7 represents a side elevation of the mounting shown in Figure 6; Figure 8 represents a plan of the needle on line 8-8 of Figure 6, the hook being omitted; Figure 9 represents a front elevation of a modified form of needle mounting;

Figure 10 represents a side elevation of the mounting of Figure 9; Figure 11 represents a section on line 11-11 of Figure 10; Figure 12 represents a detail, in front elevation, of the carriage driving means for synchronizing the under carpet support as associated with thetufting parts shown above the carpet; Figure 13 represents a side elevation of Figure 12 with the added manual control;

.Figure 14 represents a detail in front elevation of one form of needle and hook reciprocating mechanism, the front of the enclosing box being removed; Figure 15 represents a section on line 15-15 of Figure 14; and Figure 16 represents a section on line 16-16 of Figure 14; and Figure 17 represents a perspective of the machine showing the carriage and its universal guiding control.

Referring to Figures 1 to 5 of the drawings, the several steps in the operation of the tufting unit is shown with the material 10 stretched horizontally with its backing juxtaposed to the unit, and its pile face seated upon a support plate 11, which has an aperture 12 for the passage of the needle 13 and its associated hook 14. As will be described later, the plate 11 has a laterally shiftable mounting to accurately follow the travel of the tufting unit and so hold the material taut while the needle pierces the material. The size of the aperture 12 is sufficiently large to permit proper cooperating action of the needle and hook in feeding and looping the yarn 15 through the material. The yarn 15 is drawn by the needle from a reel or spool of any well known type. The needle 13 is in the form of a thin flat T-shaped strip terminating below the eye 16 in a piercing point formed by a bias cut on the face opposite to the leading face of the needle as the latter travels laterally. The face of the needle opposite the hook is formed with a lengthwise way 17 which diverges in the T-head as a funnel-like guide to lead the hook into its sliding position in the way 17.

In contrast to the rigid mounting of tufting needles which has been the practice heretofore, the present invention provides a rockable mounting which allows the needle to have a restricted swing in the plane of its travel as the mounting moves forward while the needle is still in the material. As shown, the T-head of the needle is bolted or otherwise made fast to a yoke 18, which straddles a block 20 fixed to the lower end of the yarn feeding tube 21, and is pivoted to the block 20 on a pivot 22, to form a horizontal axis transverse to the plane of travel. To restore the needle 13 after a yielding movement and to bias it to down stroke position, a coil spring 23 encircles a bolt 24 and is compressed between the nut 19 on the bolt and an angle bracket 25 fixed to the front of the block 26. The bolt 24 is threaded into the yoke needle and hook about a vertical axis.

Referring now to thezhook and its mounting, the hook 14 proper, is a relatively thin flat offset body dimensioned to ride freely in the guide way 17 of the needle and having a base or butt pivoted, on a horizontal pivot 27, to ayokeZS; which straddles a head 39 on the lower end of a vertically arranged operating rod 31, and is in turn pivoted on a pivot 32 passingthrough the head 30. This latter pivot 32 (permits the hook to yieldgrearwardly as its mounting moves forward while the hook is i'n the a fabric but is restored toits normal position by albiasing coil spring 33, immediately after the hook clears the fabric. 'This coil spring 33 is compressed between a bracket 34 fixed. to thehead 3d, anda bracket '35 fixed to theyoke 28; Thus the hook 153 isv free for a-limited swing in the plane, of travel of the mounting The pivot; 27 is provided to permit yielding of the hook cross :wiseofjthe path of 'travel'but is biased to vertical pcisition by flat springs 36 bearing'respectively against H opposite sides of the hook butt, which latter has flat faces abutting therespective springs as. Fromthe foregoing it will be observed. that the hook has a yield swing both in the plane oftravel and transverse to thatt'r-avel which in association with a rotary movement about a vertical axis (to be described) provides acomplete univ salmovement. V V :Whlld the needle 13 is pivoted at 22 to yield in the plane of its travel,,it is contemplated also to provide'for a cross-wise yieldingv as shown in Figures 9 and 10, wherein the butt ofthe needle is arranged to swing about a pivot 37 through the yoke 18 at right angles to the pivot 22 but; is; maintained biased'to its normal vertical position; by flat springs 38, fixed respectively to opposite sides of the yoke 18,. by studs 40, while the free ends of the springs 38 bear respectively against opposite sides of the needle butt.

As apreferred means for vertically reciprocating the needle 13 and hook 14, in alternately timed relation, two

vertically reciprocal rods 41 and 42 are journalled in a housing 43, the former being actuated by a rock'lever {if and the latter by a rock lever 4-5. The two levers 41-1 and 45 are, alternately actuated respectively by cams or the other well known movement transmitting means. The m0ti0n of the rod 41 is transmittedto the needle tube-'21 by alaterally disposed yoke 46 fastened to the rod; 41 by a set screw 47 at one end and at the other end; straddling a collar 48, which is provided with *two holes SQ and, 51 for the respective passage of the hook rod 31- andthe, needle tube 21. The yoke 46 is thus adjustable, on the tube 21 to' vary the stroke of the needle as-desired. A set screw 52;.fastens the collar 48 to the tube while, an. integral circumferential flange 53 on the collar 48 seats in a groove 54 in the yoke 46'. By this arrangement reciprocation of the yoke 46 is transmittedto' the collar -38 and to the tube 21 while permitting the collarf48 to turn with any turning of the Since the collar 4851s not connected to the rod 31. the latter has free sliding movement through the-hole 51 for independent reciprocation as required. Preferably the .hole 51 pro= V to. the rod 31 while an integral flange 62 on the collarf 57 seats in a groove 63 in the yoke 55 similarly to that. described for th'e yoke'flfi. Thus reciprocatingmovement is transmitted by the yoke 55 to the collar 57 and the rod 31, while permitting the collar 57 'to follow any turning of the vneedletube 2-1 and the hook-rod 31* abouta vertical axis. Since the collar 57 is not connected to the tube 21, the latter has free sliding movement through its collar hole for independent reciprocation as required. Preferably this collar'hole provides a clearance about the tube 21.

For permitting the tufting unit to follow the contour of a selected pattern it is journalled in the housing 43 so that the tube 21 and rod 31 can rotate together about a vertical axis. Thus theupper ends of these members traverse holes in a bearing'64'journalled in the housing 43 and the lower ends thereof traverse holes in a hub 66 journalled in the bottom of the housing 43. Rotation of the unit takes place through the mediumof a'driv'e'n bevel gear 67 keyed to the hub 66 andarranged to be manually turned by' a hand wheel 68 for accurate swing of both the needle and the hook. Also the gear 67 is in causing the tufting members to turn together abouta vertical axis to follow a pattern, and :the latterto simultaneously alternately reciprocate the needle andthe hook.

. Since the tufting unit is arranged to travel over all-of the backing area of a carpet in following'the patternit is necessary to provide means for causing the support plate 11 to accurately follow the same pattern and'maintain its vertically alined relation with the needle and the hook. For this purpose the plate 11 is fixed to a post 72 to extend horizontally in contact relation with the pile face of the carpet or other material and'with its hole 12 coaxial with the uis about which the tufting unit turns. The post 72 forms an extension of a gear box 73, which is'carriedon the outer end of one branch 74 of avertically bifurcated arm 75, the upper secondbranch 76 thereof, carrying the housing 43 in superposed relation to the gear box 73. The bifurcated arm 75 thus prothe carpet-being tufted. As a travelling support, a

swingable inverted U-shaped frame 77 has a transverse shaft78 supporting a rotatable drum 80 having a wheel 81 keyed thereto and adapted to travel over the top. of a'table 82. The drum 80 carries an attached worm gear 83 driven by a pinion 84"through ag'ear train including shaft 85, gear 86, pinion 87, spindle 8 8,bevel gears and 91, shaft 92, sprocket 93 and'chain 94; This chain 94 is driven from a suitable power source'as will be understood. j

' As a means for swinging the frame 77 about aver; tical axis,- a sleeve 95 extends upwardly through the bottom of the gear box 73 to turnrelative thereto in a bearing96 to terminate in a bevel gear 97 keyed thereon, The lower end of the sleeve 95 carries aflangej 98 bolted or otherwise made fast to the top" of the wheel frame 77; -As shown, the sleeve 95 provides a through hole for the spindle 88; The gear 97 is driven by a meshing gear 93 keyed to a shaft 100 extending horizontally below and parallel to-the shaft 71, and driven'by bevel gears 1M and 1132 from a shaft 103 in turn rotated by bevel gears 104 and 105 from the shaft 71. Thus'by operating the hand wheel 68, the tufting unit and the wheel frame travel in synchronism while following'the pattern. As an aid to accurate and sensitive angular turning the traction face of the Wheel 81 is bevelled to. for rnan approximate line. contact with the-tabletop.

V In order that the two units carriedby the arm 75 c'an be'swung to all parts of the stretched carpet, thiszarm 75 is pivoted on a vertical pivot 1 06 fixedto a skeleton frame 107 having upper and lower; extensions; 1.08 iournalledf upon a post 1143 rising from a. pedestal lllfixedto.the floor; Adjacent the free end of the .frame;10 7 a-dep,e11.d,-. ing leg 112 carries a journalled wheel 113 ,to support. and

- follow the movement of the arm 75;, Asi'will be seen from Figure 12, a horizontal universal swingfof thef tufting,

gas ets head and the underneath supporting plate 11 is provided, and which in conjunction with the swivelled wheel support ensures precision following of a pattern. This swing movement is controlled by the user grasping the handle 68 attached to the gear 67. While the swivelled wheel rides upon a fixed base as a support for the plate assembly and can accurately trace the pattern, it has also an important function as a control for tuft spacing. As will be seen from Fig. 12, the wheel 81 rotates about a horizontal axis but it is also. turnable about its vertical swivel axis which isdirectly alined with the axis about which the needle turns. Thus since the tufting umt and the wheel 81 swing together about the common pivot 106 with the same radius the pattern is always followed precisely and without distortion. This novel axis ahnement assembly is what brings about its universal movement, ensures accurate coordination for uniform spacing of the tufts, and prevents a distorted pattern such as necessarily follows where the supporting Wheel and unit do not swing about a common pivot. It should be borne in mind that present novel assembly solves the problem of effectively tufting heavy, backed carpet and hence requires massive construction weighing hundreds of pounds. By this pattern following assembly the entire area of a stretched carpet can be operated upon by manually propelling the jointed frame wherever the pattern dictates tufting is to take place. There is no turning or other manipulation of the material as has been necessary in applying a pattern to a carpet heretofore.

With the pattern following motion in mind the operation of the tufting unit can be followed from Figures 1 to 5, inclusive, wherein the axis of rotation of this unit is indicated by the arrows. In Figure 1 the needle 13 has pierced the material and drawn a length of yarn with it and the hook 14 has snapped into alinement with the hook guide and then follows down as shown in Figure 2 to hold the placed yarn while the needle rises to leave the loop held by the hook as in Figure 3. As the needle tube 21 is moving to the right as shown in Figure 2, the needle mounting swings about its pivot 22 to relieve strain upon the fabric and as it rises to clear the fabric the coil spring 23 restores it to the position shown in Figure 3. Here a length of yarn 15 follows the needle upwardly while the hook holds the loop, and it is this length which serves to relieve any strain on the yarn as the needle again starts down on a working stroke. This small excess strain relieving length is shown in dotted lines in Figure 4 where it enters the space provided by the offset of the hook. It should also be noted in Figure 4 that the hook 14 due to lateral contact with the fabric (while its mounting moves to the right as shown in Figure 4) has yielded by swinging about its pivot 32 but holds the loop as shown in Figure 5 while the needle has continued its down movement drawing the yarn for the next loop. As soon as the hook rises about the fabric as shown in dotted lines Figure 1, it is restored to its initial position by the coil spring 33. Where sharp angular turning is required in following the pattern both the needle and the hook are provided with yield-means to relieve the lateral strain on the fabric. In the case of the needle, the pivot 37 functions as shown in Figures 9 and 10, while in the case of the hook the pivot 27 functions. In both constructions flat springs operate to restore the members as soon as each rises above the fabric.

In order that the needle and the hook can be removed from the carpet, as in change of pattern or otherwise, the support 11, is arranged to be lowered by a handle 114, to control a toggle, including pivoted links 115 and 116, the former being pivoted to the post 72, which carries the support 11. In this way the carpet follows the lowering movement until free from both the needle and the hook. Thus a forward pull of the handle 114, breaks the toggle for the lowering movement and a rearward push restores the toggle to bring the support 11 to its carpet supporting position.

Having now described my invention,I claim: 1 f

1. In a tufting machine, the combination of a needle for passing yarn through a fabric, a hook coacting with said needle to form a loop in said fabric, common meansfor causing said needle and hook to travel in a selectedpath, means mounting said needle to swing in the plane of its travel while in the fabric, means also mounting said needle to swing cross-wise with respect to its path of travel means mounting said hook to swing in the plane of its travel in response to lateral fabric contact, and means to respec tively reciprocate said needle and hook in timed relation.

2. A tufting machine in accordance with claim 1; wherein supplemental means mounts the hook to swing crosswise with respect to said path of travel in response to lateral fabric contact to prevent fabric damage by lateral contact therewith.

3. In a tufting machine in accordance with claim 1 wherein means are provided to rotate said needle and said hook about a common vertical axis.

4. In a tufting machine, the combination of a needle for passing yarn through a fabric, a hook coacting with said needle to form a loop in said fabric, common means for causing said needle and hook to travel in a selected path, means respectively mounting said hook to swing in the plane of its travel and cross-wise of said travel in response to lateral fabric contact, means to restore said hook when out of the fabric, and means to respectively reciprocate said needle and hook in timed relation.

5. In a tufting machine the combination of a tufting unit including a needle, a hook and means respectively to reciprocate said needle and hook in timed relation, means to rotate said needle and hook about a common vertical axis, a plate to support a carpet on the face opposite to that which the needle enters, means including a swivelled wheel for maintaining said plate in alined position with respect to said needle, the swivel axis of said wheel being in alinement with said hook and needle axis means to drive said wheel, a frame for supporting said unit and said maintaining means respectively alined in vertical spaced relation to receive a carpet therebetween, and means mounting said frame for universal movement in a horizontal plane to follow a selected pattern.

6. A tufting machine in accordance with claim 5, wherein means are provided to turn said tufting unit relatively to said frame.

7. A tufting machine in accordance with claim 6, wherein means operate to turn said wheel in synchronism with said tufting unit.

8. A tufting machine in accordance with claim 7, wherein a common means controls both turning means.

9. In a tufting machine, the combination of a needle for passing yarn through a fabric, a hook coacting with said needle to form a loop in said fabric, common means for causing said needle and said hook to travel in a selected path, means mounting said needle to swing cross-wise with respect to said path of travel, means mounting said hook to swing cross-wise with respect to its path of travel, said two swinging means being respectively actuated by lateral contact of the needle and the hook with the fabric, and means to reciprocate said needle and hook in timed relation.

10. In a tufting machine, the combination of a needle for passing a yarn through a fabric, 'a hook coacting with said needle to form a loop in said fabric, common means for causing said needle and hook to travel in a selected path, means respectively mounting said needle to swing in the plane of its travel and cross-wise of said travel, both in response to lateral fabric contact, means respectively mounting said hook to swing in the path of its travel and cross-wise of said travel, both in response to lateral fabric contact, and means to respectively reciprocate said needle and hook in timed relation.

11. As an element of a tufting unit, a vertically disposed rod, means supporting said rod for reciprocation, a rockable member pivoted to the lower end of said rod to swing in a selectedplane, a: yokepivoted tosaid member to swing in a.p1ane at. right anglesto said first plane, and a hobkuc'a-rried by said yoke, whereby said hook support is operated selectively bylateral fabric contact with the hook in. its, lii1e of' travel and by contact cross-wise of said travel;

12.,Asan element of a tufting mit a vertically disposed arn, feedtube; means supporting said tube for reciprocatioii, arockabl'e member pivotedto said member to swing iii. a selectedjplane, a yoke pivoted to said member to swingin alplaneat'right angles to said first plane, and a needle. carried. by'said yoke,whereby said needle support 7 Rice ."June" 14,1932

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US463548 *Jul 15, 1891Nov 17, 1891 Turfing implement
US836623 *Aug 22, 1905Nov 20, 1906Joseph BerchaTurfing implement.
US1389115 *Jun 18, 1920Aug 30, 1921Michael BassistyAutomatic hand-embroidering machine
US1809241 *Aug 11, 1927Jun 9, 1931Alonzo Jennings NathanFancy work machine
US1862768 *Jul 1, 1930Jun 14, 1932Rice Edward EMachine for hooking rugs and the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3108554 *Apr 26, 1961Oct 29, 1963Cabin Crafts IncMachine for producing pile fabrics having different pile heights
US3132612 *Jan 7, 1960May 12, 1964Cabin Crafts IncMachine for producing cut and uncut pile fabrics
US3155059 *Mar 14, 1963Nov 3, 1964Cabin Crafts IncMachine for producing cut and uncut pile
US3243332 *Jan 30, 1961Mar 29, 1966Dritz ArthurApparatus for simulated plastic sewing
US4088316 *May 13, 1976May 9, 1978Marius SzafianskiDepressurized tethered tennis ball training device
US4187788 *Oct 26, 1978Feb 12, 1980B & J Machinery Company, Inc.Tufting machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/80.41, 112/222, 112/80.5
International ClassificationD05C15/20, D05C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationD05C15/20
European ClassificationD05C15/20