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Publication numberUS2786717 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1957
Filing dateMay 1, 1952
Priority dateMay 1, 1952
Publication numberUS 2786717 A, US 2786717A, US-A-2786717, US2786717 A, US2786717A
InventorsRausch Roswell H
Original AssigneeRausch Roswell H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Atomizer
US 2786717 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 26, 1957 R. H. RAUSCH AToMIz R Filed May 1, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 3

FIG. 2

FIG. I

[III] lllllllllliIL INVENTOfi W l W Y 0 WW w a M March 26, 1957 i2. H. RAUSCH 2,786,717

ATOMIZER Filed May 1 2 I 2 SheetsSheet 2 H3. 8 FIG. 9

ATTO R N EY United States Patent 2,786,717 ATOMIZER Roswell H. Rausch, Plain'field, N. J. Application May 1, 1952, Serial No. 285,447 9 Claims. Cristi-8s This invention relates to improvements in atomizers and nebulizers, either in the form of squeezable containers or rigid containers upoii which squee'zable heads are mounted.

Many products are sold in squeezable, collapsible plastic bottles or tubes-for example, deodorants or nasal sprays. In these cases the plastic bottle is thrown away after the contents are used up, as a single use container is desired. However,it is also a practice to just sell empty plastic squeezable bottles so that they may be filled and re-fi lled from liquids sold in glass bottles. While this practice reduces the .cost it also has its disadvantages and hazards,-for a person may inadvertently use one material when he thinks he is using another, since few people will be careful enough to make up a label, every time the plastic bottle is refilled. The question of cleanliness also comes into the matter; the useof .onemateria'l and then another from the containercausing danger of contamination. ,It is, therefore,,evident that while the design of the container for getting the best type of atomization or spray for a particular product anduse is of great importance the question of cost of thedevice 'is also a matterof major importance in mass produced products.

Squeeze bottles consist essentially of an elastomeric plastic body; an extruded plastic tube, the size of the bore depending on the liquid to be sprayed, going from'the bottom of the bottle to the sprayhead; a spray head in which the air is mixed with the liquid forming a spray or mist as it leaves the bottle; .and a closure for sealing the liquid and bottle from the outside air. An atomizer head may also be applied to a glass bottle, theatomizer head providing means for sucking the liquid up from the bottle through a tube and providing the air for atomizing or nebulizin'g.

In the squeeze bottle or tubular container, the various elements are usually made of molded plastic parts, the sizes of which will vary in some degree with variations in the manufacturing processes-+s'uch as "ariations in the shrinkage of the plastic. When these parts are assembled the error may be accentuated, a high spot on onepiece striking a high spot on it's mating piece, or a lowspot on one piece mating with a low spot. It will be appreciated that in using sprays of this character only minute quantities "of liquid and air are used and if the sizes of the air and liquid passages Vary, the quality of the spray will also vary. It will also be appreciated that in the 'mechanics of assembling parts in itself errors will be introduced.

It is the object of my invention "to provide not only a means of getting an improved s ray but to eliminate the variations in quality of spray through variations in size and assembly, and to reduce cost through the elimination of parts and their assembly.

.In the accompanying drawings I have illustrated oertain preferred embodiments of my'inven'tion.

Figure l is a vertical section through an atomizer made inaccordance yvith myinyeption, the liquid container being of generally spherical form;

faces might be provided with registering grooves.

2,786,717 Patented 26, 19,57

Figure 2, is asection taken along line 22 of Figure 1 showing the lowerp-art of the container in plan view; 7

Figure 3 is an enlarged detail showing the mixing chamber for air and liquid, the air and liquid passages leading into it, and the outlet passage for thespray;

. Figure 4 is a side elevation of a modified form of container;

Figure 5 is a vertical section taken along line 5--5 of Figure 4;

Figure 6 is a side elevation of another modified form of container; r I I Figure 7 is a vertical section taken along line 7- -7, of Figure 6;

Figure 8 is a vertical section through a. still further modified form of atomizer, one section of which is rigid, the other flexible;

Figure 9 is a vertical section taken along line 9'9 of Figure 8;

Figure 10 is a vertical section through a modified form or" the device of Figure 8, in which a rigid partition divides the rigid and the flexible sections, the compression of the latter expelling a stream of air which nebulizes and expe ls the liquid.

Figure 11 is a vertical section along line 11-11 of Figure 10;

Figure 12 is an enlarged fragmentary section, similar to Figure 10, but showing the air and gas passage in greater detail;

Figure 13 is .a vertical section through a modified form of the nebulizer shown in Figure .10;

Figure 14 is a vertical section taken along the line M-14 of Figure 13;

Figure 15 is a vertical section taken along line 15-15 of Figure 13.

The atomizershown in Figure l is generally spherical in shape and made of a suitable elastomeric .plastic',- such as polyethylene or vinyl; It is made up of two sections: a larger upper section 1 and a smaller lower section 2, each provided with a circular mating flange 3v and 4 respectively. I makethe two sections of the sphere of. unequal size so that thelarger inaybe filled with liquid'to a level above the equatorial plane of the sphere before the parts of the container are assembled. Thus when the parts are assembled and the atomizer sup-ported upon its base 5, the level of the liquid 6 stands initially at a point above the equatorial plane, as shown in Figure l. The mating face of the flange 3 is shown plane and the mating face of the flange 4 is provided .with molded grooves which when overlaid by the flange 3 fornipassages, although both After the two mating flanges are brought into contact they are bonded together into an integral whole by one of various known methods: using an adhesive, or'heat and pressure either by contact or electronically. Of the passages formed by the mating flanges (best shown in Figures -2 and 3), 7 is the liquid passage extending from a point near the-bottom of the container to a point above its equatorial plane, as shown in Figure l, and 8 is the air passage whichcommunicates with the air space above the liquid. A circular mixing chamber 9 stands at the conflux of the passages 7and .8 and communicates with the atmosphere through an outlet passage 10.

V Thedevice functions as follows: Air overlies the liquid 6, the air chamberhaving access to the atmosphere through passage 1%, mixing chamber 9 and passage 8. The user presses upon the sphere deforming it as shown roughly in the broken lines in Figure 1. This compresses the supernatant air within the container and this, in turn, creates an overlying air pressure. in the upper portion of the sphere which does two things: (.1) itforces the liquid through passage .7 into theiriixing chamber 9, and (2-) it also forces air through the passage 8 into the mixing chamber 9. The

move in a straight line and also in the path directly toward the outlet 10. The heavier liquid particles, because of their mass, will tend to move under the impulsion of the air and strike the wall of the mixing chamber at 11 where they will be broken up and deflected toward the outlet It In so doing these fractured particles will be picked up by .the air stream moving directly toward the outlet, resulting in a uniform spray mixture going out of the passage 10-to the object to be sprayed.

In the modified form shown in Figures 4 and 5, both sections are the same size, but the atomizer as a whole functions just as the one shown in Figure l.

The atomizer shown in Figures 6 and 7 is similar to the one shown in Figures 4 and 5, except that it is rectangular in elevation and made up of sections of unequal sizes. The spray emerges horizontally and the larger sec- .tion is provided with a filling inlet 12 which may be closed by any suitable closure. This atomizer can be refilled.

In the forms shown in Figures 1 through 7, the amount of liquid sprayed and the proportion of air to unit of liquid may be varied by varying the relative sizes of the liquid and air passages. The amount of liquid and air -mixture sprayed will also vary with the amount of displacement caused by deflecting the walls of the container and the speed with which they are pressed.

Where the desired amount of liquid to be sprayed is smaller, it is possible to make one part of the container rigid, such as 13 of Figure 8, and another part flexible, as at 14. Pressure exerted on the flexible, dome-shaped member 14 atomizes the liquid in the manner already described in connection with Figures 1, 2 and 3.

Where still finer spray or mist is desired I prefer the construction shown in Figures 10 through 15. The nebulizer shown in Figure 10, for example, comprises a rigid member 15, like the member 13 in Figure 8, and a flexible member 16 the counterpart of member 14 of Figure 8. Unlike the atomizer shown in Figure 8, however, the nebulizer of Figure 10 is provided with a rigid partition 17 dividing the device into a liquid compartment and an air compartment. :plastic, as are also the members 15 and 16, the peripheral The partition 17 is made of area of the partition 17 being held between and joined to the flanges 18 and 19 of the members 15 and 16 respectively, as shown in Figure 10. The partition 17 is pro- ,vided with a groove which when overlaid by the flange 19 of the member 16 constitutes a liquid passage 20. Liquid enters this passage from the liquid compartment through a passage 21 at its bottom and, because of its surface tension, rises in the passage 20 somewhat above the level of the liquid in the compartment, as shown best in Figure 11. The air within the air compartment communicates with the atmosphere through a passage 22. As shown in Figure 11 this air passage is relatively wide at its inner end 23, narrows down at its throat 24, and widens out again at its outlet 25. The liquid passage 20 joins the air passage 22 at the throat 24. When deforming pressure is exerted on the flexible member 16, air is forced under pressure out through the passage 22. At the wide mouth 23 of the passage the air has a relatively high static and low velocity head, the velocity head increasing and the static head decreasing at the throat 24 and the velocity head decreasing at the outlet 25. The effect of this is to exhaust the air from the passage 20 above the liquid and cause the liquid to rise and be drawn into the air stream passing through the throat 24 toward the outlet 25, thus forming a finely divided spray or mist. It is necessary, of course, that the interior of the liquid compartment be connected to the atmosphere. For this purpose I provide a passage 26 so that as the liquid is exhausted, air from the outside is drawn in thus preventing a vacuum being formed above the liquid.

In the modified form shown in Figures 13, 14 and 15, the member 27 is made of a rigid plastic, glass or other suitable material. A rigid partition 28 overlies the mouth of the member 27 to form a liquid compartment. A flexible plastic member 29 is mounted upon the partition to form an air compartment its flange 30 overlying the peripheral area of the partition 28. The flange 30 is provided with grooves which, in cooperation with the partition, form passages 31, 32 and 33 corresponding in function to passages 26, 22 and 26 respectively of Figure 11. Liquid from the liquid compartment enters the passage 31 through a hole 34 in the partition 28 and air enters through opening 35. The member 27, the partition 28 and the flexible member 29 are 'held in assembled position by means of a cap 36, the depending skirt of which is provided with internal threads which engage external threads 37 on the member 27. Partition 28 is provided with a projection 38 through which the outlet passage 32 and the inlet passage 33 extend. The depending skirt of the cap 36 is provided with a slot 39 through which the projection 38 extends and which permits rotation of the cap relative to the projection 38. The members are assembled as indicated in Figure 13, the top of the cap being pressed against the flange 30 which, in turn, presses upon the peripheral area of the partition 28, the latter being held against the lip of the member 27 The device illustrated in Figures 13, 14 and 15 may be refilled, but functions very much as the device shown in Figures 10, 11 and 12.

The air and liquid passages shown in the drawings are exaggerated in size for illustrative purposes; actually they are much smaller than shownin some instances being no more than capillaries. These sizes are well known in the art.

In the following claims the word atomizer is used generically to include devices commonly called nebulizers, as well as those commonly called atomizers, the practical diflerence being in the degree to which each subdivides the liquid.

I claim:

1. An atomizer comprising a multipart container for the liquid to be atomized and supernatant air, the parts of the container having mating faces, an outlet for the atomized liquid, grooves in the mating faces which when the mating parts are assembled cooperate to form liquid and air passages meeting adjacent the outlet, and means for increasing the pressure of the supernatant air to force liquid through the liquid passage and air through the air passage to cause a spray to emerge from the outlet.

2. An atomizer comprising a multipart container for the liquid to be atomized and supernatant air, the parts of the container having mating faces, an outlet for the atomized liquid, grooves in one of the mating faces which when covered by a plane mating face form liquid and air passages meeting adjacent the outlet, and means for increasing the pressure of the supernatant air to force liquid through the liquid passage and air through the air passage to cause a spray to emerge from the outlet.

3. An atomizer comprising a multipart container for the liquid to be atomized and supernatant air, the parts of the container having mating faces, an outlet for the atomized liquid, grooves in one of the mating faces which when covered by a plane mating face form liquid and air passages, a mixing chamber adjacent the outlet into which the air and liquid passages lead, and means for increasing the pressure of the supernatant air to forc e liquid through the. liquid passage and air through the air passage and into the mixing chamber to cause a spray to emerge from the outlet.

4. An atomizer comprising a compartment for liquid,

a compartment for air having a flexible wall, a partition separating the two compartments, a groove in the peripheral area of the partition, a flange on the air compartment wall overlying the groove to form a liquid passage, a

passage leading from the liquid compartment to the liquid passage, a second groove in the partition overlaid by theflange on the air compartment wall to form an air passage extending across the outer end of the liquid passage, and an air inlet to the liquid compartment, whereby pressure applied to the flexible wall of the air compartment forces a stream of air through the air outlet passage which draws liquid into an air stream and atomizes it.

5. An atomizer comprising a multipart container for the liquid to be atomized and supernatant air, the parts of the container having peripheral mating surfaces, an outlet for the atomized liquid, grooves in one of the mating surfaces which when the mating parts are assembled form liquid and air passages meeting on the inner side of the outlet, the liquid passage being in communication with the liquid within the container and the air passage being in communication with the supernatant air, and means for increasing the pressure of the supernatant air to force liquid through the liquid passage and air through the air passage to cause a spray to emerge from the outlet. i

6. An atomizer comprising a container including a plurality of parts having peripheral sections secured together with surfaces on said sections in face-to-face contact, an outlet from the container for the atomized liquid, and passageways lying between and defined by said surfaces, one of the passageways having an inlet open to an air space within the container and leading to the outlet, another of said passageways joining the first passageway between its ends where it extends between said peripheral sections and having an open inlet positioned to be below the level of liquid placed in the container, whereby upon an increase in the pressure of the air in the air space, a stream of air will be caused to flow through the first passageway from the interior of the container out through the outlet and liquid will be caused to flow through said other passageway and into the path of the air stream to be atomized thereby.

7. An atomizer as defined in claim 6 in which a portion of the container forming said air space is at least in part flexible, whereby pressure of the air in the air space may be increased by inward distortion by said flexible portion.

8. An atomizer as defined in claim 7 which includes a partition forming separate liquid and air spaces in the container.

9. An atomizer as defined in claim 6 in which the outer end of the passageway leading from the air space to the outlet is outwardly flared, the mid-section of said passageway is constricted to form a throat, and the liquid passageway entersthe passageway leading from the air space to the outlet at said throat.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,392,600 Limbach Jan. 8, 1946 2,492,405 Strokalitis Dec. 27, 1949 2,606,073 Uhri Aug. 5, 1952 2,609,233 Stearman Sept. 2, 1952 2,609,235 Reimann Sept. 2, 1952 2,615,565 Bower et al Oct. 28, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 229,404 Germany Jan. 23, 1910 955,148 France June 20, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2392600 *Feb 5, 1942Jan 8, 1946Alex LimbachAtomizer
US2492405 *Apr 23, 1948Dec 27, 1949Scovill Manufacturing CoAtomizer head
US2606073 *Oct 24, 1949Aug 5, 1952Uhri William CWashing and cleaning gun
US2609233 *Aug 3, 1948Sep 2, 1952Lloyd C StearmanVapor spray system
US2609235 *Jun 1, 1949Sep 2, 1952Reimann Leo DDispensing and atomizing container
US2615565 *Jan 9, 1947Oct 28, 1952BowerSuture package and method
*DE229404C Title not available
FR955148A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3235135 *Mar 3, 1964Feb 15, 1966Evor SocPressurized fluid dispenser with a measuring vessel
US3897005 *Aug 31, 1973Jul 29, 1975Reiner GeorgeConvenience spray dispensing packet
US4162748 *Jan 13, 1978Jul 31, 1979Risdon Manufacturing CompanyDispenser using belleville diaphragm
US4275840 *Jul 9, 1979Jun 30, 1981Panpack A.G.Package for storing and spraying small amounts of liquids
US4858831 *Feb 22, 1988Aug 22, 1989Donald SpectorHand-actuated fragrance emitting unit
US6460781 *May 17, 1999Oct 8, 2002Valois, S.A.Sampling-type spraying device
US6663019 *Sep 17, 2002Dec 16, 2003Valois S.A.Sampling-type spraying device
US20040144811 *Dec 23, 2003Jul 29, 2004Valois SasFluid dispenser
DE2922740A1 *Jun 5, 1979Jul 3, 1980Panpack AgShampoo paste container with spray - is sachet with channels which convey liquid to spray jet via swirl chamber
WO2004058596A1 *Dec 19, 2003Jul 15, 2004Valois SasFluid product dispenser
WO2006053969A1 *Nov 9, 2005May 26, 2006OsmoozeDevice for slowly dispensing a liquid, such as a perfume
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/327, 239/369, 239/363
International ClassificationB05B11/06, B05B11/04
Cooperative ClassificationB05B11/043, B05B11/06
European ClassificationB05B11/04D1, B05B11/06