Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2787812 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1957
Filing dateMar 15, 1954
Priority dateMar 15, 1954
Publication numberUS 2787812 A, US 2787812A, US-A-2787812, US2787812 A, US2787812A
InventorsLong Charles A
Original AssigneeLong Charles A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Interlocking wall structure
US 2787812 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 9, 1957 c. A. LONG 2,787,812

INTERLOCKING WALL STRUCTURE Filed March 15, '1954 III FIE 3 F INVENTOR.

I E I CHARLES A- LONG ATTORNEYS United States Patent INTERLDCKING WALL STRUCTURE Charles A. Long, San Jose, :Calif.

Application March 15, 1954, Serial No. 416,272

2 Claims. (Cl. 20-4) The present invention relates "to walls, and pertains more particularly to a keyed, interlocked wall structure which can be assembled from prefabricated 'parts with- -'out the use of nails or other extraneous securing means.

The present invention contemplates the provision of a keyed, interlocking wall structure wherein longitudinal bracing elements are arranged for interlocking relation with upright elements of a wall structure. The invention also provides an improved interlocking wall structure which may be assembled easily from prefabricated elements, and which, when completed, will be strong,

weathertight and of high heat insulative value.

Another object of the invention is 'to provide an improved simplified interlocking wall structure.

These and other objects of the invention will be apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings, wherein but having a modified base portion for use in making :exterior walls, the top and bottom portions ofa building 1111 which the wall is incorporated .being indicated in broken outlines.

Fig. 3 is a vertical transverse sectional View of a wall similar to that shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional view taken along line 4-4 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. l but showing a modified form of wall structure.

Referring first to the interior wall structure shown in Figs. 1, 3 and 4, a wall A comprises a top horizontal member and a bottom horizontal member 11. The top member 10 is grooved on its underside at 12 to re ceive the upper ends of a plurality of upright wall members 13 in interfitted relation therein.

Holes 14, which may be bored or cut with conventional mortising machinery, are provided throughout the length of the member 10. These holes are aligned longitudinally of the upper horizontal member 10 and are spaced apart at required intervals to receive the interlocking key members to be described later herein. The lower longitudinal wall member 11 has a groove 11 on its upper side similar to the groove 12 in the member 10. Holes 18 (Fig. 1) also are provided throughout the length of the member 11 similar to the holes 14 in the upper longitudinal member 10.

Each of the upright wall members 13 has a groove 19 in each longitudinal edge thereof. Each groove 19 is of a size and shape to receive a vertical interlocking key member 20 therein, and is located opposite the groove 19 in an adjacent upright wall member 13 when the wall is assembled as shown in the drawings.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 4 the width of each key mem- 'ber 20 is twice the depth of the grooves 19, so that when the wall A is assembled the upright members 13 will-be in edge to edge abutting relation.

The tightness of fit of the interlocking key members 20 in the grooves 19 of the upright members 13 may be predetermined as required by the intended use of -the wall. For example, if the wall is to be used as a part of a temporary structure, and is to be disassembled at an early date, the lit of the interlocking key members in the grooves 19 may be quiteloose. if the wall is to bea part of a permanent structure, or if a maximum degree of tightness against air infiltration is required, this fit may be as tight as practicable. Excessive tightness however makes assembly more difficult and is not necessary.

In order to prevent the collection of run-off water in the groove 17 of the lower longitudinal member 11, when a wall, such as the wall B of Fig. 2, is intended for exterior exposure, a modified lower longitudinal member 21 preferably is employed. The member 21 is similar to the lower member 11 of the wall A shown in Fig. l, with the exception that the outer flange 22 (Fig. 2') is omitted, and the upper surface 23 of the projecting exterior sid'e portion of member 21 is sloped outwardly and downwardly in the manner of a conventional sill to drain ofi any water which may flow down the exterior face of the wall B.

The interior type of wall A (Figs. 1 and 3) may be erected'byfirst mounting a longitudinal base memberlti on any suitable support, such as the floor 24 of aco nventional foundation structure C (Fig. 2). An end portion of one of the main upright wall members 13 theiris fitted into the groove 17, and is centered between an adjacent pair of holes 18, 18 in the lower member 11 so as to bring its edge grooves 19, 19 into register with'these holes. An intermediate key member 20 then is fitted into each groove 19 in the upright wall member 13, the

lower end of each key member being inserted in the hole 18 in register therewith in the member 11. Additional upright wall members 13 and key members 29 then are similarly mounted in alternate order as shown in Figs. 1 and '4 throughout'the desired length of the wall. The upper longitudinal member 10 is mounted in groovedown position over the upper ends of the upright wall members 13 with the upper ends of the members 13 within the groove 12, and the upper ends of the key members 20 fitted into the holes 14 in the upper member 11.

The wall B of Fig. 2 is generally similar to, and is erected in a manner similar to the interior wall A of Figs. 1 and 3. The remaining building structure such as a roof assembly D may be erected on the walls in a conventional manner.

After the walls have been completed, usual door, window and other openings as required may be cut therein by the use of conventional tools, such as rotary hand saws, or other cutting tools in a manner which will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

In the further modified wall structure shown in Fig. 5 the upright wall members 13a are similar to the members 13 of Figs. 1 to 4 inclusive. The upper longitudinal member 10a and lower longitudinal member 11a also are generally similar to the corresponding members 11 and 11, with the exception that the holes 14a and 13a, respectively, therein are longer than the holes 18 to receive wider key members 213a. The key members Zita are of a width substantially greater than twice the depth of the edge grooves 19a into which they are fitted so as to space a the upright wall members 13 by an amount equal to this has a pleasing appearance, and allows but little air infiltration therethrough. For example, if two inch lumber is used for making the upright members 13 the walls will have high heat insulative properties. Both the exterior and interior surfaces of the walls A and B as shown in .the drawings and described herein are of excellentappearance and lend themselves well to modern trends in decoration, as by staining, varnishing or painting. Also, either surface of either wall A or B may easily be covered with other decorative or insulative materials if desired.

For example, if it is desired to stucco the exterior side of the wall, this may be done in a conventional manner by applying usual stucco wire mesh to the exterior side of the wall and then applying the stucco thereover in a well known manner. For finishing the interior surface of the wall, it may be plastered over conventional metal or other lath applied to the wall in a well known manner, or the wall may be covered with any of the well known types of gypsum or other panel or wallboard which also are well-known to those familiar with the building art.

Although the wall of the present invention may be fabricated easily and satisfactorily from wooden lumber, it is desired to point out that any or all of the various parts thereof also may be molded or extruded from plastic or other material, in a manner which will be obvious to those skilled in the manufacture of such materials.

While I have illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of the present invention, it will be understood however, that various changes and modifications may be made in the details thereof without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is defined in the following claims.

l claim:

1. An interlocking building wall comprising a pair of longitudinal members mounted in spaced, parallel relation, each longitudinal member having a groove formed lengthwise therein facing the opposite longitudinal member, each longitudinal member having a plurality of holes transversely therein with the central axes of the holes aligned to define a common plane extending lengthwise of the longitudinal members and spaced at predetermined intervals throughout the lengths of both longitudinal members, one hole in each longitudinal member being axially aligned with a corresponding hole in the other longitudinal member, a plurality of upright wall members extending from one of said longitudinal members to the other, the ends of said upright members being inserted in the grooves in said longitudinal members with the edges of adjacent upright members parallel to and opposite each other, and a plurality of key members inserted one in each axially aligned pair of said holes to extend from one of said longitudinal members to the other with the end portions of each key member inserted in the axially aligned pair of said holes for interlocking engagement therewith, the edges of each adjacent pair of said upright members being grooved to receive a key member therein.

2. An interlocking building Wall comprising a pair of longitudinal members mounted in spaced, parallel relation, each longitudinal member having a groove formed lengthwise therein facing the opposite longitudinal member, each longitudinal member having a plurality of trans versely extending holes through the portion thereof de' fining the bottom of the groove therein and spaced at predetermined intervals along both longitudinal members, the holes in each longitudinal member being oppo site corresponding holes in the other longitudinal mem her, a plurality of upright wall members extending from one of said longitudinal members to the other, the ends of said upright members being inserted in the grooves in said longitudinal members, each upright member having a pair of similar grooves formed one in each edge thereof, and a plurality of key members inserted one in each opposite pair of said holes in said longitudinal members to extend from one of said longitudinal members to the other with the end portions of each key member extending into such opposite pair of holes and into the grooves in the edges of an adjacent pair of said upright members for interlocking engagement therewith.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PAT ENTS.

1,564,393 York Dec. 8, 1925 2,183,620 Myers Dec. 19, 1939 2,412,242 Beaud Dec. 10, 1946 2,550,883 St. Vincent May 1, 1951 2,619,686 Dombrowski Dec. 2, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1564393 *Sep 19, 1924Dec 8, 1925York Don HBuilding construction
US2183620 *Mar 30, 1938Dec 19, 1939 Building construction
US2412242 *May 26, 1944Dec 10, 1946House Maurice Beaud & FilsDismountable barrack
US2550883 *May 28, 1947May 1, 1951St Vincent Clarence JosephBuilding structure
US2619686 *May 22, 1947Dec 2, 1952Dombrowski Stanley BBuilding construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3061894 *Oct 14, 1958Nov 6, 1962Kamisato Ernest HPrefabricated wall
US3075253 *Jun 5, 1959Jan 29, 1963HammittPartition assembly
US3142069 *Dec 4, 1962Jul 28, 1964Trojan Pools IncConstruction members for swimming pools
US3254462 *Jul 31, 1961Jun 7, 1966Toler George PFlexed panel wall construction
US3323265 *Jul 20, 1964Jun 6, 1967Kongskilde Maskinfabrik AsContainer with connecting elements for the wall portions
US3386216 *Jan 15, 1965Jun 4, 1968Charles ZwickertPartitioning elements, in particular for the erection of dismantlable and removable partitioning
US3538660 *Nov 27, 1967Nov 10, 1970Moor KarlPrefabricated wall assembly for partitions and the like
US4031675 *Feb 26, 1976Jun 28, 1977Roberts Raymond PFree standing redecoratable vertical wall or divider
US4942713 *Jun 9, 1989Jul 24, 1990Harter CorporationInterconnecting structure for releasably securing successive panels in a relocatable wall
US5782054 *Jan 17, 1997Jul 21, 1998Forintek Canada Corp.Wood wall structure
US5852424 *May 20, 1997Dec 22, 1998Stealth Network Technologies Inc.Building elements and support structure for enclosing an antenna
US6134861 *Aug 9, 1999Oct 24, 2000Spude; Gerald T.Foundation construction method
US6374552 *Apr 12, 2000Apr 23, 2002Alliance Concrete Concepts, Inc.Skirting wall system
US6691471 *Dec 11, 2001Feb 17, 2004Alliance Concrete Concepts Inc.Mortarless wall structure
US7073301Sep 20, 2000Jul 11, 2006Alliance Concrete Concepts Inc.Wall structure
US7207147Apr 12, 2001Apr 24, 2007Alliance Concrete Concepts, Inc.Mortarless wall structure
DE8911395U1 *Sep 25, 1989Aug 23, 1990Gebr. Kuehne Gmbh & Co. Saegewerk Und Holzhandel, 3404 Adelebsen, DeTitle not available
WO1993008344A1 *Oct 11, 1992Apr 29, 1993Franz StommelPrefabricated wall element
WO2005078207A1 *Feb 2, 2005Aug 25, 2005Concrete Volymes Sweden AbBuilding element
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/779, 52/780
International ClassificationE04B2/70
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/703
European ClassificationE04B2/70B2