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Publication numberUS2788160 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1957
Filing dateAug 31, 1953
Priority dateAug 31, 1953
Publication numberUS 2788160 A, US 2788160A, US-A-2788160, US2788160 A, US2788160A
InventorsAbraham Hertz
Original AssigneeAbraham Hertz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-sealing collapsible tubes
US 2788160 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 9, 1-957 A. HER-rz 2,788,160

SELF-SEALING COLLAPSIBLE TUBES Filed Aug. 51, 195s /Nl/ENTOR ABRAHAM HERTZ Wig/Md@ @ww AGENT Unite This invention relates to a dispensing cap which is particularly designed to be used in conjunction or integral with a collapsible toothpaste or' shaving cream tube or with tubes holding any fluid or semifluid material.

Heretofore collapsible soft metal tubes, such as toothpaste tubes, utilized threaded caps which were removed when usage of the contents of the tubes was required. Due to the customarily repeated usage of the tubes, the threads became worn allowing air passageways into the tube and the hardening of the tube contents. Moreover the caps, as utilized in the prior art, provide a greater supply of material than is required, or can be used, since the ow of the tube contents cannot be controlled or rapidly shut oit. Conventional caps are also frequently lost or misplaced, allowing the tube contents to harden.

The present invention overcomes these dilculties and accomplishes the following objects by providing, in the specific embodiments incorporated herein, for a cap that may be integral with or threaded upon the neck of a collapsible tube. The cap is resiliently movable when pressure is exerted upon the sides of the collapsible tube to present an aperture through the cap to the interior of the tube. Removing the pressure from the sides of the tube allows the resilient member to restore the positioning ofthe cap and shut oit the aperture.

It-is therefore an object of the present invention to provide for a novel collapsible tube having a self-sealing cap integral therewith.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a novel, sturdy and durable collapsible container and cap which is relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture, assemble and utilize.

Still another object of the present invention is the provisionl of a novel collapsible container having a dispensing aperture which is automatically covered when the container is not in use.

Still another object of the present invention is the pro# vision of a novel cap for collapsible containers which does not have to be removed to extract the tube contents.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide in a collapsible tube, a self-sealing dispensing ,cap having an outer tubular member closed at the top and open at the bottom adapted to removably receive the neck of the tube, an inner tubular member slidably movable within said outer member, resilient means normally urging said inner member towards the body of said tube, and a dispensing aperture in the inner member which is registrable with the neck opening of the tube when pressure is applied to the sides ofthe tube.

Still another object of the present invention is the provision of a self-sealing collapsible tube having only two parts; a one-piece valve and the tube proper.

Still another object of the present invention is the provision of a self-sealing collapsible tube operable by squeezing the sides of the tube in the conventional manner.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide in a collapsible tube, a self-sealing dispensing cap closed at theV top and open'at'the bottom adapted to'be atent Lice movably received in the neck of the tube and having a dispensing aperture and a resiliently positioned blocking member normally urged to its blocking position adjacent the aperture, and resilient means normally urging the cap towards the body ofthe tube.

Still another object of the present invention is the provision of a novel collapsible tube having a dispensing cap which is movable in the neck of the tube and normally urged by the sloped sides of the neck of the tube towards the body of the tube. The cap has a normally sealed dispensing aperture and a valve controlled by the pressure on the sides of the tube.

Still another object of the present invention is the provision of a novel collapsible tube having a rotatable cap normally covering a dispensing aperture in the neck of the tube, and resilient means urging the cap to cover the aperture.

Further objects and advantages will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon consideration of the following description taken in conjunction with the drawing wherein:

Fig. 1 is the top view of the novel collapsible container of the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a side view of the novel collapsible container of the present invention;

Fig. 3 is a partial sectional view taken along line 3 3 in Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is the top view of a modication of the novel collapsible container of the present invention;

Fig. 5 is a side view of the modification of the novel collapsible container of the present invention;

Fig. 6 is a partial sectional view taken along line 6-6 in Fig. 5

Fig. 7 is the top view of a second modication of the novel collapsible container of the present invention;

Fig. 8 is a side View of the second modilication of the novel collapsible container of the present invention;

Fig. 9 is a partial sectional view taken along line 9-9 in Fig. 8;

Fig. l0 is the top view of a third modification of the novel collapsible container of the present invention;

Fig. ll is a side view of the third modification of the novel collapsible container of the present invention;

Fig. 12 is a partial sectional view taken along line 12-12 in Fig. l1;

Fig. 13 is a top view of a fourth modification of the novel collapsible container of the present invention;

Fig. 14 is a side view of the fourth modification of the novel collapsible container of the present invention;

Fig. 15 is a partial sectional view taken along line 15-15 in Fig. 13; and

Fig. 16 is a partial sectional view taken along line 16 16 in Fig. l5.

Referring to Figs. 1 through 3, wherein is shown the rst exemplary embodiment of the novel collapsible or flexible walled tube of the present invention, the tube is indicated generally at Zit. The tube 20 is a thin walled flexible container for retaining such fluids as tooth paste, shaving cream, salve and the like. The tube 20 has a neck 21 which is threaded at 22 near the junction of the neck 21 and the remainder of the tube 20. The neck 21 supports a cap 23 which, in the closed position shown in Fig. 3, rests against either the top 24 of the neck 21, or against the threaded portion 22, or against both. The cap 23 is axially movable, or sidable, upon the neck 2l when pressure is applied to the walls of the tube 20. The cap 23 has a dispensing aperture 28 which is shut o from the contents in tube 20 by the neck 21 when pressure is not applied to the tube 20. The cap 23 is retained in its closed or sealing position, in the .absence of applied pressure, by the resilientmemf ber, 'or coiled spring 26. A gasket seal 27 separates the base of the cap 23 andthe spring 26 so that the tube contents do not squeeze past thebase of the cap 23. The spring 26 and seal 27 are restrained in position by the retainer 25 which is threaded upon the threaded portion'v 22 described above.

When pressure' is applied Vto the thin walls of tube 2t) thercontents thereof 'exert pressuretagainstrthe top of the movable cap 23. When the exerted pressure is greater than the restoring force of-spring 26 the cap 23 4is forced up compressing the spr-ing 26. As long as the dispensing aperture 2S is blocked by the neck 21 of tube 2t), the tube contents cannot exit therethrough. When, however, the aperture 2S clears the top of the neck 2i a cylindrical, or otherwise lshaped ribbon depending upon the shape of aperture 28, of the tube Contents, is emitted. Releasing the pressure exerted upon the walls of tube 20 allows the restoring spring 26 to return the cap 23 to its lower or sealing-position, shutting 'off the dispenser aperture 28. The arrow 29 on the top of the cap 23 as shown in Fig. l ismolded, stamped, printed-or-otherwise impressed, to indicate the position of the dispensing aperture 25.

The len'gthof the neck 21 and cap 23 may be decreased or vthe aperture 28 located closer to the top of cap 23 to decrease the time, after pressure is applied, before the tube contents can be forced out. Locating the aperture 28 adjacent the top 24A of the neck 2l allows the contents to be squeezed out almost immediately upon applying pressure to the walls of tube 20. The aperture 2S is located as shown in Fig. 3 to permit easy access thereto with a toothbrush and to maintain the aperture 28 clean. The cap assembly can be readily modified to be removable and threads provided to take the place of conventionalrcaps on conventional tubes.

Referring now to'Figs. 4 through 6, the tube 30 is shown, which is designed to minimize the accumulation of paste on the outside thereof. The main part of tube 30 is integral with the head or neck 31. The top of neck 31 has a retaining lip 39 which mates with the top of the slidable cap 33. The cap 33 includes the abutment 34 which has an outer circumference which slidably mates .f

with the inner circumference of the head 31. The cap 33supports a coiled `spring 38 and slidable aperture block 37 which are retained in position by the retaining bulge 36. The cap`33 also supports the coiled spring 32 and gasket seal 40 upony the abutment 34. In its normal condition an aperture 43 in cap 33 is blocked by the internal aperture block 37. The block 37 may be constructed of metal, plastic, rubber, etc. When pressure is applied to the thin walls of tube 30 the pressure istransmtted to the abutment 34 of cap 33 and to the aperture block 37. The restoring` force of spring 3S is slightly greater-,than that of spring 32 so that the applied pressure 4first causes the compression of spring 32. T he cap 33 is in this manner moved up'until the aperture i3 clears the top of the head 31 of tube 30. Further pressure compresses spring 38 and moves the slidable block 37 to clear the aperture 43 and allow the tube contents to be squeezed out. The aperture 43 can be larger and can be located in a position closer to the lip 39 of head 31 to decrease the time before the emission of the tube contents. The aperture 43 is located as shown in Fig. 6 for easy access thereto with a toothbrush and maintain it covered when the tube 30 is not in use.

When the applied pressure relaxes or is removed, the block 37 is restored to its normal or blocking position and the cap 33 is -returned into head 31. The bulge 35 yre'strains the cap 33Ain normal position and the bulge 36 retains the block 37 in normal position. The gasket seal 40 prevents the tube contents from squeezing between the cap 33 and head 31 to the spring 32. Paste accumula tion is minimized on the topof cap 33 and on retaining lip 39. The arrow 42 on top of the cap 33 indicates the aperture position. The embodiments shown in Figs. 4 through 6 may be provided as al separateunit andat- -tachedto the conventionalthreaded collapsible tubes.

In the exemplary embodiment of the present invention,

shown in Figs. 7 through 9, the tube Si) includes the neck or head 51 which is integral therewith. The head 51 supports the single valve or cap 52. There are no other components utilized in the specific embodiment shown in Figs. 7 through 9. The valve 52 is a formed or molded resilient rubber composition or similar material and comprises the restraining tip or rounded retainer top or ring 53. When the tube 50 is assembled, the valve 52 is inserted from below before the bottom of tube Si) is lilled and sealed. 'the ring 53 is depressed into the depression 54 when it is pressed against the retaining ledge 55. The ring 53 snaps into place or to its original shape when the assembly or insertion is complete.

When pressure is applied to the walls of tube 50, or to the tube proper, it is transmitted to the block 56 of the valve 52. The base 57 of valve 52 is restrained by the lip 5S or head 51. The pressure applied to the block 56 causes the thin walls 59, which connect the block 56 and the base 57, to stretch and the upper part of valve 52, including block 56, to move up. A stop 6), which is mounted on the wall 59 limits the movement of the upper portion of valve 52 when it meets the ledge 55 of the head 51. Further pressure causes the block 56 to bend providing an opening or passageway at 61 for the tube contents to ow through the channel or aperture 62. Upon relaxation of pressure to the walls of tube 50, the opening at 6l closes and the thin walls 59 contract to return the upper portion of valve 52 to its normal position. Only the tip of block S6 at 61, the walls 59 and the tip of ring 53 are thin and highly iiexible. An arrow 64 is provided on cap 52 to indicate the aperture position.

Various modifications of valve 52 may be provided as by changing the dimensions and size of the various components without departing from the spirit of the present invention and the embodiment shown in Figs. 7-9 may be prgvidedas a threaded cap for conventional collapsible tu es.

In the specific embodiment shown in Figs. l0 through l2, the tube 7i? is assembled by inserting the cap 7l through the neck 72 over the washer or seal 73. The legs 74 of cap '7l are flexible and exert a pressure against the sloped walls 75 of neck 72. The pressure exerted by legs 74 tends to maintain the cap 71 in its lowermost position with its top bearing against and supported by the neck 72.

When pressure is exerted upon the thin walls of tube 70 it is transmitted through the tube contents against the bottom of the washer valve 76. The pressure against the bottom of valve 76 overcomes the pressure exerted by the legs 74 and causes the cap 7i to rise. The cap 71 moves in an upward manner upon the application of pressure until the stops 79 on legs 74 bear against the ledge or abutment 30 of neck 72. With the upward movement of cap 7i limited by stops 79, further application of pressure separates the hard rubber valve 76 at opening 78 and allows the tube contents to exit therethrough and through aperture 77. Relaxing the applied pressure allows the valve 76 to shut opening 73 and the legs 74 to return the cap 71 to its original position. The slope of walls 75 and the size of aperture 77 and various other dimensions can be varied without departing from the spirit of the present invention. The valve 76, for example, can be omitted entirely so that the tube contents are squeezed out as the aperture 77 clears the neck 72. An arrow Si on top of cap 7l indicates the aperture position. The embodiment shown in Figs. 10-12 may be provided as a threaded cap for conventional collapsible tubes.

The lifth exemplary or specific embodiment which is shown in Figs. 13 through 16 provides a cover or cap 92 which is inserted in neck 91 of tube 9i). In the assembly of tube '90 a spring 93 which is rigidly affixed to cap'92, 'as shown in Fig. 16, is pressed against cap 92 with the tip 94 inserted in slit 95. When the cap 92 is inserted in neck 91 the spring 93 snaps into position as shown in Figs. 13 through 15.

When pressure is applied to the sides of tube 90 it is transmitted by the tube contents against the rubber, or similar material, seal 97. The seal 97 is athxed to the cap 92 as shown in Fig. 16. The application of pressure against seal 97 deforme the spring 93 near its junction with cap 92 and causes the cap 92 to rotate in a counter-clockwise manner. The rotation of cap 92 opens the aperture 98 so that when the bottom of seal 97 passes alignment therewith the tube contents are emitted. The counter-clockwise rotation of cap 92 is limited by a stop 96 which is integral with the neck 91. The cap assembly may be provided with threads as well as the lower part of neck 91 so that the cap assembly can be substituted for the conventional cap on the conventional tube.

Various other modifications may be provided without departing from the spirit of the invention. The abovedescribed arrangements are therefore only illuustrative of the application of the principles of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A self-sealing collapsible tube comprising exible walls; a neck integral with said walls; a cap slidably supported Within said neck having a dispensing aperture, a dispensing block normally sealing said dispensing aperture and resilient means urging said dispensing block to its sealing position; and resilient means supported between said cap and said neck for urging said cap toward said exible walls, said first-mentioned resilient means having a spring constant which is greater than the spring constant of said second-mentioned resilient means.

2. A self-sealing collapsible tube in accordance with claim 1 wherein said cap has retaining bulges for supporting said block and said neck has retaining bulges for supporting said cap.

3. A self-sealing collapsible tube in accordance with claim 2 wherein the top of said cap is iiush with the top of said neck and said iirst and second-mentioned resilient means are coil springs.

4. A self-sealing collapsible tube consisting of the tube proper and a one-piece resilient valve member supported in said tube proper, said valve member comprising a retaining tip engaging the top of said tube proper, a dispensing aperture, a blocking member normally sealing said aperture, a base at the lower end of said valve member engaging said tube proper, and a thin wall section connecting said blocking member and said base, said thin wall section being resiliently deformed upon the application of pressure to said tube proper before said blocking member is deformed to unseal said aperture.

5. A self-sealing collapsible tube in accordance with claim 4 wherein said valve member comprises in addition a stop for limiting the upward movement of said aperture and said blocking member upon the application of pressure to said tube proper.

6. A self-sealing collapsible tube comprising a sloped wall neck; a cap supported by said neck having resilient legs engaging said neck, and a dispensing aperture normally blocked on one side by said neck; and a washer valve supported in said cap normally blocking the other side of said aperture, the application of pressure to said tube raising said cap due to the action of said neck on said legs to unseal one side of said aperture before said washer valve unseals the other side of said aperture.

7. A self-sealing valve comprising a movable member having a closed and an open position and comprising an aperture having an inner and an outer end; a tirst means normally blocking said inside end of said aperture; resilient means urging said first means to block said inside end; resilient means urging said movable member towards said closed position whereby said outer end of said aperture is covered; and means whereby said movable member is operable to uncover said outer end of said aperture before said first means is operable to unblock said inner end of said aperture.

8. A one-piece self-sealing valve comprising a movable member having a closed and an open position and comprising an aperture having an inner and an outer end; a irst means contiguous with said movable member normally blocking said inside end of said aperture; resilient means contiguous with said rst means urging said first means to block said inside end; resilient means contiguous with said movable member urging said movable member towards said closed position whereby said outer end of said aperture is covered; and means whereby said movable member is operable to uncover said outer end of said aperture before said first means is operable to unblock said inner end of said aperture.

9. A self-sealing valve comprising a movable member having a closed and an open position and comprising an aperture having an inner and an outer end; a rst means normally blocking said inside end of said aperture; resilient means urging said first means to block said inside end; resilient means contiguous with said movable member urging said movable member towards said closed position whereby said outer end of said aperture is covered; and means whereby said movable member is operable to uncover said outer end of said aperture before said rst means is operable to unblock said inner end of said aperture.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,301,229 Coker Apr. 22, 1919 1,729,979 Bell Oct. 1, 1929 2,101,909 Lateur Dec. 14, 1937

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1301229 *Sep 3, 1918Apr 22, 1919Clarence A CokerSanitary valve for fluid-dispensing apparatus.
US1729979 *Aug 9, 1927Oct 1, 1929Bell Harrie ADispensing tube
US2101909 *Nov 18, 1935Dec 14, 1937Lateur Gaston LSelf-opening and closing cap for collapsible tubes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5332126 *Jun 15, 1993Jul 26, 1994Guala S.P.A.Automatic paste container closure device
US5931352 *Sep 11, 1997Aug 3, 1999Knight Plastics, Inc.For a squeeze container
US5989469 *Sep 11, 1997Nov 23, 1999Knight Plastics, Inc.Method for making a non-drip valve for an inverted container
WO2005063586A1 *Nov 26, 2003Jul 14, 2005Shun-I PanSliding piston opening means
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/492, 222/496, 222/92
International ClassificationB65D47/04, B65D47/20
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/2031, B65D47/2018, B65D47/2093
European ClassificationB65D47/20E, B65D47/20E2, B65D47/20E6