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Publication numberUS2788213 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1957
Filing dateDec 7, 1953
Priority dateDec 7, 1953
Publication numberUS 2788213 A, US 2788213A, US-A-2788213, US2788213 A, US2788213A
InventorsDonald E Hull
Original AssigneeDonald E Hull
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baseball game
US 2788213 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 9, 1957 Filed Dec. '7, 1955 D. E. HULL BASEBALL GAME 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 A FAST JI FAST 2 FAST 2 FAST GROUND GROUND GROUND GROUND I=- LINER LINER LINER LINER B GROUND BUNT GROUND BLNT GROUND BWT GROUND @FOUL @FOUL FOUL FOUL FLY FLY FLY FLY O O O LSVJ IV .LSVJ II ISv -I Z8 .LSvL-I 2H 3 FAST 3 FAST 4 FAST 4 FAST GROUND GROUND GROUND GROUND I==- LINER LINER LINER LINER BUNT GROUND Bum GROUND BLN GROUND B GROUND @FOUL FOUL FOUL FOUL FLY FLY FLY LY 9 G G G LSVJ 92 .LSVA E9 LSvL-I I78 LSVA 1 H 5 FAST 5 FAST x FAST Y6 FAST GROUND GROUND GROUND GROUND LINER ==1 LINER LINER LINER @ROUND GROUND GROUND @GROUND FOUL FOUL FOUL FOUL FLY FLY FLY FLY G G G 9 .LSvL-I 9G .LSVJ 9d ISv -I 9X .LSvL-I 9A 57 FAST F8 FAST 9 FAST GROUND GROUND GROUND LINER LINER LINER GROUND GROUND GR UND FOUL FOUL FOUL FLY .FLY FLY I G G G .LSVJLH .LSVJ 9;! J SV -I6C| INVENTOR.

FIG. I

AT may April 9, 1957 D. E. HULL 2,788,213

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F IG. 2 XBCURVE YSCURVE' FOUL FOUL 7 SB GROUND GROUND sTRlKE FOUL FOUL DROP FOUL LINER LINER @FOUL FLY FLY FOUL Q Q BA L L FOUL :manoQX BAHFDQA wvsmaaos 88 F l G. 6

7 SLOW' 3 sLoW BALL BALL STRIKE sTRIxE GROUND GROUND BALL BALL BALL BALL.

Q1) ([0 INVENTOR. g QE') DONALD E. HULL BY 1 r ATT RNEY D. E. HULL BASEBALL GAME Filed Dec. 7, 1955 4 She etS-Sheet 3 F4 LOW LOW LOW LOW BALL BALL BALL BALL GROUND GROUND GROUND v GROUND 00 F0 FOUL FOUL @lui F03: @sow. @FOUL LINER LINER LINER LINER Q1 03 MO"! 17;! MOI 9G MO'I 9H MOI L8 FIG. 3 E8 A A smmz UMPIRE'S WP UD IS 2333 BALL STRIKE DEZAIZN 2 FWL OVER mi fiim BALL WP sAtouroF BOX LINE BALL s9 HITBYBATI'ER Mm 3 THROW '3 2.222 HOlld O'HM dM momma 0d F IG. 7 FIG. 8

E0 HIGH HIGH I HIGH HIGH LINER m-a LINER can LINER c n IJMER FLY FLY FLY FLY FOP-UP POP-UP mnup POPUP POP-UP POPUP POP- UP POPUP BALL BALL BALL BALL 03 01 HDIH OEl HDIH Z3 HQIH 9E) HOIH 9V J7 HIGH FIG. 4

Ca! LINER FLY POP-UP POPUP INVENTOR. STRIKE DONALD E. HULL (9 BY HOIH Lr D. E. HULL BASEBALL GAME April -9, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Dec. 7, B53

FIG.

INVENTOR. DONALD E. HUL L United States Patent BASEBALL GAME Donald E. Hull, Berkeley, Calif. Application December 7, 1953, Serial No. 396,449

4 Claims. (Cl. 273-93) This invention relates to a game, and more particularly to a game played with cards and other devices whereby a game of baseball may be simulated.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel simulated baseball game which will incorporate the rules of the actual game of baseball and which will present the possibilities through the manipulation of the devices provided of achieving substantially all the diiferent plays and circumstances which can occur during the playing of a baseball game.

Another object of this invention is to provide a simulated baseball game which will permit the knowledge required for the skillful playing of an actual baseball game to be employed with success in the simulated game to the end that baseball enthusiasts will find the simulated game challenging and entertaining.

A further object of this invention is to provide a card game wherein the cards are marked and distinguished with novel legends and indicia pertaining to the game and are arranged to be coordinated to indicate which of one or several situations apply to the play from the many unpredictable situations possible.

Further objects will be obvious or will become apparent as the description of the invention proceeds hereinafter.

The invention comprises a game which employs a game board together with a deck of cards. The cards may be divided into five suits of unequal numbers together with three cards of no suit, and on each card there are placed various legends denoting possible conditions resulting in a baseball game when a ball is pitched or a pitched ball is batted. When one card is placed beside another an index, or in some cases a legend, on a designated one of the cards will, in conjunction with the other card, indicate specific information relative to the further condition of play or position of the ball. Information relative to the position of a batted ball is referred to the game board, which simulates in general conformation a baseball playing field, but which is divided into discrete portions in a particular manner, the portions containing symbols and notations which designate the outcome of the play. The initial result of the play may, in some cases, be modified by further manipulation of the cards to determine the final outcome, all of which will be described and explained in more detail hereinafter.

The invention will be described more fully in conjunction with the accompanying drawings which represent the components employed in a preferred embodiment of this invention. In the drawings:

Fig. 1 represents the cards of one suit of the deck, nominally the Fast suit, and shows the symbols, legends, and indicia used thereon in accordance with a preferred embodiment of this invention.

Fig. 2 represents the cards of the Curve suit.

Fig. 3 represents the cards of the Low suit.

Fig. 4 represents the cards of the High suit.

Fig. 5 represents the cards of the Slow suit.

Fig. 6 represents one of the cards not identified with a suit and which will be called the Screwball card.

Fig. 7 represents another of the cards not identified with a suit and which will be called the Wild Pitch card. i

Fig. 8 represents another of the cards not identified with a suit and which will be called the Pitch-out card.

Fig. 9 represents the game board simulating a baseball playing field, and shows the configurations and notations employed as a part of the game.

It will be noted from the drawings that the preferred embodiment of the invention contains a deck of forty cards which may be segregated as follows:

15 Fast 10 Curve 2 Slow 1 Screwball 1 Wild Pitch 1 Pitch-out (Umpires Decision) The cards of each suit may, if desired, be distinguished by making the markings on each of a different color, as, for example, black for the Fast suit; orange for the Curve suit; green for the low suit; blue for the High suit; red for the Slow suit. The odd cards can be sufficiently distinguished from the suit cards by the distinctly diiferent configurations of the markings appearing thereon, and they also may have colored identifications if desired.

The designation of the cards of the deck as Fast, Curve, etc. indicate the nature of a ball that has been pitched. Each of the suit cards has on it a legend comprising a letter and a number combined, as, for example, D9, Fig. 1, which will be used in a manner to be explained hereinafter to give information as to the direction and distance of a batted ball. The combinations appearing on the cards of the various suits are as follows:

Fast-A1, J1, B2, H2, C3, G3, B4, H4, D5, F5, X6, Y6, E7, F8, D9.

Curve-C4, G4, AS, I5, B6, H6, D7, F7, X8, Y8.

Each card of the deck has in a designated corner on a particular side of it a symbol representing a baseball. If the baseball symbol has an S included therein, thus 9, it indicates that a strike has been pitched, and if it has lines representing a seam on a baseball cover, thus (11 it indicates a ball has been pitched. If desired, the ball symbols may be distinguished by different colors, as red for Strike and black for Ball.

Each of the suit cards has disposed along one edge of it, on the same side ofthe card that contains the baseball symbol, various legends denoting the condition of a pitched or batted ball. These legends are identical for all cards of a given suit, with two exceptions noted below, but are different for cards of different suits. As will be noted in the drawings, Figs. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, the legends for the various suits are as follows:

Fast-Ground, Liner, Ground, Foul, Fly.

Curve-Foul, Ground, Foul, Liner, Fly.

LowBall, Ground, Foul, Foul, Liner, except card E8, Fig. 3, which has the legends-Strike, Ground, Foul, Foul, Liner.

HighLiner, Fly, Pop-up, Pop-up, Ball, except card J7, Fig. 4, which has the legends-Liner, Fly, Pop-up, Pop-up, Strike.

SloW-Ball, Strike, Ground, Ball, Ball. The Screwball card, Fig. 6, contains the legends Strike, Foul, Foul, Foul, Foul; and the Wild Pitch card, Fig. 7, contains therepea'ted legends Ball similarly placed. The legend va symbol.

appearing on the Pitch-out card, Fig. 8, will be explained hereinafter.

With the exception of the Slow suit, on the opposite side of the suit cards from that containing the above- :noted legends appears the symbol of a baseball bat. This symbol is placed in an identical position on all the cards of a given suit, but its position is different on cards of different suits. The Screwball card also contains such On some of the cards of the Fast suit, Fig. '1, namely, A1, J1, B2, H2, C3, G3, B4, H4, the word Bunt appears below the bat symbol in an identical position on each of these cards.

The bat symbols and legends described above are so positioned that when two cards containing respective symbols or legends are placed with their appropriate edges adjoining, the bat symbol will indicate which one of the various legends applies to the particular play, as will be explained more fully later. Where applicable, the word Bunt likewise indexes a particular legend.

All of the cards, with the exception of the Pitch-out card, have at the center portion of their .faces the configuration of a diamond within which is included one of the numerals 0, 1, 2, or 3, thus The numeral in the diamond configuration is not uniform among the cards nor within .a suit, but varies as follows, as will be apparent from an inspection of the drawings:

Numeral 1 appears on Fast A1, I1, B2, H2, C3, G3, B4, H4, D5, F5, X6, Y6; Curve C4, G4, AS, I5, B6, H6, D7, F7, Low H6, B7; High E0, C2, G5, A6; Slow" C7.

Numeral 2 appears on Fast E7, F8; Curve X8, Y8; Low" E8, High 17, Slow G8.

Numeral 3 appears only on Fast D9.

Numeral appears on Low P4, D5, and on the Wild Pitch and Screwball cards.

The numerals within the diamond configurations are used to indicate the dispositions of runners on bases as a result of play, or in some of the optional forms of play, they indicate the disposition of the ball, as will be explained hereinafter.

The Srewball card, Fig. 6, carries on its face the legend Drop Ball. Similarly, the Wild Pitch card, Fig. 7, has on its face the legend Overthrow. These legends are used to introduce the chance of misplays in the fielding of the ball when they are played at designated situations during the game, as explained hereinafter.

The Pitch-out card, Fig. 8, is used in some optional forms of play to be explained hereinafter to indicate unusual fielding plays. The various legends shown on the Pitch-out card indicate certain relatively rare plays which may occur when this card is played against various other cards. The game is so designed that this card may, if desired, be omitted in ordinary play. Its addition to the game is analogous to the use of a Joker in the ordinary deck of playing cards, and leads to complexities of play which make the game more realistic to the :expert player.

Referring now to Fig. 9, the game board which is used in this invention is preferably, although not necessarily, made in a configuration of a baseball field which is divided into discrete areas by radial lines extending outwardly from home plate and intersecting arcuate lines spaced apart at equal distances and which have home plate as a center. In the embodiment of the invention exemplified in the drawings the'field is divided into nine radial portions which are identified by the letters, starting from left field, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, and .I. The portion of the field outside of the left field foul line is identified by the letter X, and that outside the right field foul line by the letter Y.

The arcuate lines, since they are spaced uniformly apart, divide the field ,into different numbers of portions for various parts thereof depending on the length of the specific part of the field from home plate to its outermost boundary. Thus along the 'left field foul line there are 14 arcuate portions, while at center field there are 16 arcuate portions and along the right field foul line there are 13 arcuate portions. Obviously the division of the field can be varied across its area to accommodate different shapes or dimensions of parts without departing from the concept of this invention.

Each discrete area of the field is designated and separately identified by the letter giving its direction and the number giving its distance from home plate, and the area of the field immediately in front of home plate is designated by the numeral 1 While the area of the field behind home plate is designated by the numeral 0, all of which will be apparent from an inspection of Fig. 9 of the drawings. The combinations of letter and number identifying a portion of the playing field are keyed to the combinations or letter and number appearing on the playing cards to coordinate the play between the cards and the playing field in a manner to be explained hereinai'ter.

The positions of the players on the field are indicated by the symbols for catcher in area ii, pitcher in E3, first baseman in H5, third baseman in B5, second baseman in F6, shortstop in D6, left fielder in B12, center fielder in E12, right fielder in Hi2.

The majority of the discrete areas on the field contain one or more differentiated symbols which, if desired, may be further distinguished apart by making them of different colors, and which indicate a condition of play of a ball batted to that area, in a manner to be explained. Thus the areas ll, A2, B2, C2, D2, F2, G2, H2, J2, B3, C3, G3, H3, A4, C4, D4, F4, G4, 14, E5, to, C7, E7, G7, E8 contain the symbol 0 The areas E2, D3, F3, E4, E4, H4, A5, C5, D5, F5, G5, 35, C6, E6, G6 contain the symbol 9. The area B6, H6, B7, D7, F7, H7, B3, D8, F3, H8, B9, D9, F9, H9 contain the symbol 9 The three symbols noted immediately above relate in general to a batted ball which is fielded on the ground and played for a put-out. The particular meaning of each symbol will be explained more specifically hereinafter.

The areas B9, E9, H9, All) to Hi inclusive, A11, C11, D11, F11, G11, Ill contain the symbol 0. The areas E7, E7, A8 to F3 inclusive, H8, A9, C9, D9, F9, G9, J9, A13, C13, D13, F13 contain the symbol (1). The areas A7, C7, G7, H7, l7, G8, l8, G13, BM, are, Hi4 contain the symbol Q. The areas A6, J6, A114, C14, D14, F14, G14, E15, E15 contain the symbol Q. The areas C15, D15, F15, G15, E16 contain the symbol The areas Ci6, D16, F16 contain the symbol Q. The six symbols noted immediately above relate in general to safe hits. However, the particular meaning of each symbol will be explained hereinafter.

in addition to the above symbols and notations, the playing field has specially designated areas marked Fly Safe which also indicate a condition of play. Thus by reference to Fig. 9 of the drawings it Will be noted the following area are so marked: X7 to X16 inclusive plus A8 and A; as a group; C? singly; G9'singly; J8, J9, and Y7 to Yltl inclusive as a group; X14 singly; C15, D15, F15, G15, and C16 to P16 inclusive as a group.

The various symbols, legends and notations appearing both on the cards and on the game board have been selected and placed so that during the playing of this game various play will occur with about the same frequency as they would in a major league baseball game. However, it will be apparent that other arrangements of these factors can be produeedwhich will approximate the same result. Furthermore, the frequency of occurrence of any particular "or selected type of play can be varied to any arbitrarily chosen value by a proper arrangement of symbols, legends and notation-s in accordance with the principles of this invention and without departing from the inventive concept.

The forms of the componentparts of the game have now been described, directed specifically to the exemplary embodiments illustrated in the drawings. The particular meanings of the various symbols, legends and notations, and the interactions of the component parts which occur during the playing of the game will now be explained in the form of the rules which apply to its playing.

RULES General rules Two or more players may participate in the game. Two teams are chosen among the players, and it is decided in a mutually acceptable manner which team is first at bat. Within the respective teams the batting order and pitching order is decided. Players on the same team sit side by side facing the other team across a table.

The pitcher shufiles the cards and deals six each to the batter and to himself. The remainder of the pack is placed face down on the table. The pitcher arranges his cards so that the ball symbols appear in the upper left corners. The batter arranges his cards so that the ball symbols appear in the lower right corners, thereby placing the bat symbols he may have along the left margin.

Each batter gets a new deal, with all the cards being gathered and shuffled and dealt anew. If the cards which have been dealt are all played before the batters time at bat is completed, the pitcher deals three more cards to each.

The game proceeds according to regular baseball rules: Four balls gives the batter a free trip to first base; three strikes on the batter puts him out; three outs puts the side out, and the other side goes to bat. An inning is completed when both sides have had their turn at hat. The length of the game may be agreed upon ahead of time, say 5, 7, or 9 innings. When two or more players are on a team, they take turns batting, one after the other, but each player pitches a full inning at a time.

PITCHING AND BATTING RULES Rule 1.-Pitchz'ng and batting Both the pitcher and the batter can always make a free choice of any card in their respective hands. The batter first steps into the box by picking one of the cards from his hand and holding it in the other hand with its face concealed from the pitcher. After the batter is ready, the pitcher winds up by picking one of the cards out of his hand, concealing its face from the batter. When both players are ready, they play at the same time, each placing his card to the right of the other so that the cards lie evenly side by side on the table. The pitcher always places his card face up, while the batter can choose to place his card face up if he wishes to swing or face down if he wishes to pass. It is important that the cards be placed on the table simultaneously so that the batter can not see the face of the pitchers card before playing his own.

Rule 2.-Culled strikes and balls When the batter passes, the pitch is called a strike or a ball according to the particular symbol on the pitchers card. If it shows a symbol thus 6, it is a strike; if the symbol is thus 03) it is a ball. Also, if the batter plays face up a card having no bat symbol, a ball or strike is called under this rule except in certain particular circumstances set forth below in Rules 3, 9, and the rules covering the use of the Pitch-Out Or Umpire card.

Rule 3.-Hits When the batter swings with a card having a bat symbol, the result is shown by the legend on the pitchers card opposite the bat symbol on the batters card. If the cards are of the same suit, the bat will indicate a line drive by the legend Liner. Otherwise the hit may be a fly, a grounder indicated by the legend Ground, a pop-up or a foul. The Slow cards also connect with each other for line drives, even though they do not have bat symbols on them.

Rule 4 .-Bunts When the batter plays a card of the Fast suit on which the word Bunt appears in addition to the bat symbol, he may attempt to hunt instead of swinging, by saying Bunt as he plays his card. The result of such play will be shown by the legend on the pitchers card opposite the word Bunt on the batters, rather than opposite the bat symbol.

Rule 5.Directi0n of hits The direction in which the ball is hit is determined by the letters on the cards. The letters are ranked in the following order:

XABCDEFGHJ'Y X is the lowest-rank card, and Y is the highest. On each play, the lower-rank card, whether played by the pitcher or the batter, determines the direction of the hit on the playing field.

Rule 6.-Distance of hits The distance of a hit is determined for different kinds of hits by the numbers on the two cards, as follows:

Line drive Add both numbers. Fly Add both numbers. Grounder Take pitchers number. Bunt grounder Take batters number. Pop-up Take smaller number.

The resulting number is found on the playing field. The combination of the letter and the number determines the discrete area to which the ball is hit.

Rule 7.--Missed strikes, and pulling back When the bat symbol falls opposite the legend Foul, it means a foul ball out of play, on the ground or in the stands. If a fly hit in the X or Y direction is not caught it is counted as a foul ball.

Rule 9.-Wild pitch Whenever the batter swings at the Wild Pitch card with a card having a 2 in the diamond in the center, it is a wild pitch and any runners on base advance to the next base. If the batters card has a 3 in the central diamond, the runners advance two bases. If the batters card has an 0 or a 1 in the central diamond, it is not a wild pitch, if the batters card is of the Slow suit, he takes first base for being hit by the pitched ball. Whether the batter swings or passes on the Wild Pitch card, it is a ball.

Rule 10.-Passed ball If a missed strike occurs on the Screwball pitch, it gets away from the catcher. If the batters card has a 2 in the central diamond, all runners on base advance one base on the error. If it is the third strike the batter also makes first base on the error, unless it is already occupied and there are not already two out.

FIELDING RULES Whether a fielder can play a batted ball for an out depends on the kind of hit and what discrete area on the field it is hit to.

Rule 11.Line drives A line drive hit to any discrete area containing a diamond symbol is a safe hit. A line drive hit to a discrete area occupied by a fielder or to an adjacent discrete area with the same letter or number is caught in the air for an out.

Rule 12.Flies A fly ball or a pop-up is caught by the nearest fielder unless it falls in one of the areas marked Fly Safe.

Rule 13.Grunders A grounder hit to any discrete area containing a circular symbol is fielded by the nearest fielder. The ball may then be thrown to first base for a put-out by turning a card oil the deck as explained in Rule 22. If there are runners on base who are forced to advance on the hit, play may be made for them under Rule 14 or 15. A grounder hit to a discrete area not containing a circular symbol is safe.

Rule 14.-D0uble plays If a grounder is hit to a discrete area occupied by an infielder or containing a circular symbol thus the ball may be fielded to make a double play, if a runner can be forced at second base or at home, by throwing to the fielder at the appropriate base and then throwing to first base.

Rule 15.Fieltlers choice If a grounder is hit to a discrete area containing a circular symbol thus a runner who can be forced at any base may be thrown out but the batter is safe at first base.

Rule 16.Advancing on infield outs A runner not forced to advance must hold his base on a grounder hit to a discrete area containing the symbol thus 0 or thus (9, but all runners may advance one base while the batter is being thrown out on a grounder hit to a discrete area containing the symbol thus 0.

Rule 17.Sh0rt line drives A line drive hit to a discrete area in front of an infielder, either in the sector occupied by the infielder or in one of the sectors adjoining it on either side, is fielded as if it were a grounder hit to a distance 2 units higher than the sum of the numbers on the cards.

Rule 18.-Double play on line drive After a line drive is caught by an infielder, a runner on any base can be doubled oif by throwing to that base.

Rule 19.--Extra bases Extra bases for the batter and for baserunners on line drives and on safe flies beyond the outfielders are indicated by the diamond symbols as follows:

0 Single-All runners advance one base 1) SingleRunner on second scores SingleRunner on first goes to third Q DoubleRunner on first stops at third (b Double-All runners score Q Triple Safe grounders and flies between the infield and outfield permit all runners to advance one base.

Rule 20.H0me runs A fair hit to a number larger than the largest shown on the field in that direction is a home run.

Rule 21.Fielding errors Whenever a ball is hit where it may be fielded, the pitcher, or a teammate representing a fielder, turns a card from the top of the deck to show the outcome of the fielding play; if the Screwball .card, which carries the Drop Ball legend, is turned, the batter is safe and all runners advance safely; if any other card is turned, the ball is. fielded correctly for a put-out.

Rule 22.Throwing errors Whenever the ball is to be thrown to a base for a putout, the play is made by turning a card from the top of the deck; if the Wild Pitch card, which carries the Overthrow legend, is turned, all runners advance to the next base. if any other card is turned, the throw is good and another card is turned for the catch; if the Screwball card is turned, the runner is safe; if any other card is turned, he is out.

Rule 23.Extra-base errors When a fly is dropped by an outfielder, the runners are ertitlcd to whatever extra bases are indicated by the diamond symbol in the discrete area to which it was hit.

BASERUNNING RULES Rule 24.-Stealing bases To catch a runner off first base, after the batter is in the box, the pitcher removes a card of the Low suit from his hand and immediately lays it to one side, announcing that he is throwing to base. The batter must then lay down the card he had ready to play. If it is the Fast D9 card, which contains a 3 in the central diamond, the runner is out; if it is any other card, he returns safely. If the batters card is the Wild Pitch card, all runners advance one base. These cards are laid aside after such a play and do not count as either a strike or a ball.

OPTIONAL PLAY WITH PITCH-OUT The Pitch-Out card may be omitted from the deckif it is desired to simplify the game. When it is used, the following plays may occur:

Rule 26.-Pitch-out When the pitcher throws the Pitch-Out card, if the batter swings with a card having a 2 or 3 in the central diamond, the catcher may throw to first base to catch a runner there. Only if it has a 3 in the central diamond may he catch a runner ofi second base. If the batter plays the Wild Pitch card against the Pitch-Out, it is a wild pitch and all runners advance one base. There is no play if the batter does not swing.

Rule 28.Interference by batter When the pitche rthrows the Pitch-Out card, if the batter swings with the Screwball card when runners are on base, he is ruled out for interference with the catcher.

Rule 27.-Balk When the pitcher throws the Pitch-Out card, if the batter swings with a Slow card when runners are on base, it is ruled a balk, and all runners advance one base, whether or not a steal was being attempted.

Rule 29.-Umpires decision When the batter plays the Pitch-Out card, which carries the legend Umpires Decision, and the pitcher plays a card of any suit except Slow, if the pitchers card shows the strike symbol it is called a ball, and if it shows the ball symbol it is called a strike.

Rule 30.-lnterference by catcher When the batter plays the Pitch-Out card against a Slow pitch, it is ruled interference by the catcher and the batter takes first base.

Rule 31.-Illegally batted ball When the batter plays the Pitch-Out card against a Wild Pitch card, he is called out for stepping out of the batters box to hit the ball.

Rule 32.Hit by batted ball When the batter plays the Pitch-Out card against the Screwball card, the runner nearest home is ruled out for being struck by the batted ball; if no one is on base, the batter is ruled out.

OPTIONAL PIT CHING RULES Rule 33.Intentinal walk If the pitcher has four balls in his hand, instead of pitching to the batter, he may display these at once to give the batter a base on balls.

Rule 34.Left-handed batters A batter may be permitted, by agreement before the game, to bat left-handed. In this case, the direction of all hits made by him is determined by the higher-rank card instead of the lower.

Rule 35.Right and left-handed pitchers The Curve cards bearing the designations F7, G4, H6, J5, and Y8 may be removed from the deck for a righthanded pitcher. The Curve cards bearing the designations X8, A5, B6, C4, and D7 may be removed from the deck for a left-handed pitcher. This modification, combined with that in Rule 34, will have the statistical result that left-handed batters will get a higher percentage of safe hits against right-handed pitching than will righthanded batters; the reverse will be true for left-handed pitching.

OPTIONAL FIELDING RULES Rule 36.-Umpires decision If the card turned for the catch on a play to throw out a baserunner is the Pitch-Out card, the runner is ruled safe on an nmpires decision.

Rule 37.-Advancing after fly is caught After a fly is caught in the area at distance 12 or beyond, a runner on third base may score; if at distance 14 or beyond, a runner on second base may advance to third; if at distance 15, a runner on first base may advance to second. However, if the pitcher holds among the cards remaining in his hand the Fast D9 card, he may show it and then throw to catch the runner attempting to advance.

Rule 38.-Runner out stretching a hit After an extra-base hit, if the pitcher has among the cards remaining in his hand the Fast D9 card, he may show it and then throw out the batter at second base if the hit is to a discrete area containing one of the diamond symbols thus Q; or he can throw out the batter at third base if the hit is to a discrete area containing one of the diamond symbols thus Q; or he can throw out the runner at home plate if the hit is to a discrete area containing one of the diamond symbols thus 1); or Q or he can throw out the runner going to third base if the hit is to a discrete area containing the diamond symbol thus OPTIONAL BASERUNNING RULES Rule 39.-Hit-and-run play If the batter says Hit and run or Stealing as he swings and hits the ball, any play for runners on base will be made as if the ball had been hit one discrete area farther from the fielder than is shown by the cards played. If the batter misses the ball on a hit-and-run play, play is made for the runner under the base-stealing rule, Rule 24. If the batter hits a line drive to an outfielder, any runner on base may be doubled off. A line drive to an infielder can be played for a triple out. On a bunt fly, any runner on base may be doubled ofi. On any other fly, runners return safely.

Rule 40.--Run-down play If a base runner is caught ofi first base by playing the Fast D9 card against the Pitch-Out card, the runner is trapped between bases and must be run down. This is done by the pitcher, or a teammate representing a fielder, turning successive cards ofi the pack until he turns a card have a 2 in the central diamond, which puts out the runner. If, before he turns a 2, the Screwball card is turned up, the runner gets back to base safely; if the Wild Pitch card is turned up, he advances to the next base.

It will be apparent from the foregoing description of parts and explanation of play that a novel game has been devised which simulates the game of baseball, which permits the rules of the actual game to apply to its playing, and which provides for the effects of both skill and chance to influence the game in a manner similar to that encountered in playing the actual game. It will be apparent further, that this novel game can be, at will, graduated in complexity so that in one form it will be interesting to the beginning player, and in other forms it will be sufficiently complex to fascinate the very skillful.

Obviously, the particular number and form of parts, selection and location of legends and symbols, and particular application of specific rules may be varied to produce alternative modifications of the game described and illustrated in the exemplary embodiment set forth herein without departing from the inventive concept. Therefore, it is not intended nor desired to limit the invention specifically to the exemplary embodiment disclosed but to embrace all equivalents within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A card game simulating a baseball game, compris' ing a plurality of rectangular cards having identical backs and distinguishable in suits on their faces, the faces of said cards having various different information thereon pertaining to the playing of the game and positioned along a first edge thereof in items, the sequence of said items being identical for cards of the same suit and different for cards of different suits, said cards having an index thereon and positioned on a second edge thereof opposite to said first edge, said index being difierently positioned along said second edge for cards of different suits, said cards being devised to be played in coordination by opposing players to form pairs with the said first edge of one card of a pair placed adjoining and in align ment with the said second edge of the other card of the pair, said index on said other card of the pair being positioned to physically point out a specific portion of the information contained on the said one card of the pair to thereby designate a specific condition of play for the game.

2. In a card game simulating a baseball game, a plurality of rectangular cards each distinguishable from theothers, each of said cards containing a different variety of information designating various possible conditions of play, some of said information distinguishing particular cards as a ball or a strike, some of said information on some of said cards denoting by separate items various conditions of a pitched ball and a batted ball, the lastnamed information being separated sequentially by items on said some of said cards and placed along an edge thereof, means on some of said cards to physically point out on others of said cards a specific one of said items when two of said cards are played as a pair, some of said variety of information denoting a direction and distance of a batted ball, the direction and distance information being combined for two cards played as a pair to determine for a play the direction and distance of a batted ball, and some of said variety of information on some of said cards denoting a condition influencing a runner on base said plurality of cards being played sequentially in coordinated pairs by opposing players to produce a continuum of difierent plays and conditions of play to advance said game to completion.

3. In a game simulating a baseball game, the combination of a plurality of rectangular playing cards and a game board each of which contains a variety of information thereon pertaining to the playing of the game, said cards having faces which are mutually distinguishable from each other and having identical backs, said cards being arranged to be played in pairs in coordinated relationship, means placed adjacent an edge on some of said cards to physically point out a particular portion of said information positioned in items along an edge on others of said cards to designate a particular condition of play, said cards being arranged to provide in coordination information in addition to said particular portion thereby to provide further information pertaining to a condition of play, the combined information from said cards designating particular information to be selected from said variety of information on said game board to thereby provide further information pertaining to a condition of play sequential pairs of cards being continuously formed by opposing players to produce a series of dilferent plays and conditions of play which will advance the said game to completion.

4. In a simulated baseball game a plurality of rectangular cards and a game board representing a baseball field and having home plate established thereon, said game '12 board beingdividedinto a plurality of discrete areas, indicia associated with said discrete areas to indicate for each a-respect'ive position relative to home plate, differentiated symbols associated with said discrete areas to indicate conditions of play for respective areas, said cards having various legends thereon denoting conditions of play, some of said legends being disposed along an edge of said cardsin items, the sequence of said items being identical for cards of the same suit, said cards having in-- dicia thereon corresponding to the first said indicia, said cards being arranged to be played in coordination by opposing players to form pairs, means on some of said cards to physically point out particular legends on others of said cards to denote particular conditions of play, the said indicia on a pair of cards being combined to select a discrete area on said game board, the information from said cards and said game board being combined to determine the outcome of a play and said plurality of cards being played sequentially in coordinated pairs to produce together with the sequentially indicated information on said game board a continuum of difierent plays and conditions of play to advance said game to completion;

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 840,584 Piper Jan. 8, 1907 1,069,741 Tompkins Aug. 12, 1913 1,084,618 Elliott Jan. 20, 1914 1,267,947 Whiteside May 28, 1918 1,532,066 OConnor Mar. 31', 1925 2,060,973 Brown et al. Nov; 17, 1936 2,629,597 Lenit Feb. 24. 1953

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4261569 *Jul 16, 1979Apr 14, 1981Frohlich Stanley JBaseball board game
US4708344 *Feb 17, 1987Nov 24, 1987Wyatt Hugh JBaseball game apparatus
US4776593 *Sep 25, 1987Oct 11, 1988Dipersio MarshaVCR baseball game
US5071136 *Nov 8, 1990Dec 10, 1991Lott Nathaniel ECollectable sports card board game
US5145173 *Apr 15, 1991Sep 8, 1992The Pent CorporationBaseball game
US5762337 *Aug 9, 1996Jun 9, 1998Clutch Games, Inc.Apparatus and method of playing a baseball board game
US6663107 *Mar 21, 2002Dec 16, 2003Anthony J. FisherCard game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/244.2, 273/298
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00031
European ClassificationA63F3/00A4B