Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2788530 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1957
Filing dateFeb 4, 1952
Priority dateFeb 4, 1952
Publication numberUS 2788530 A, US 2788530A, US-A-2788530, US2788530 A, US2788530A
InventorsFerguson James J
Original AssigneeJerome A Rooney
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rescue apparatus
US 2788530 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 16, 1957 J. J. FERGUSON RESCUE APPARATUS Filed Feb. 4, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 (fa/1 7.95 1]: 1 8 rc 1.15011 J. J. FERGUSON A ril 16, 1957 RESCUE APPARATUS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 4, 1952 April 16, 1957 J. J. FERGUSON RESCUE APPARATUS 4 Shee'ts-Sheet 5 Filed Feb. 4, 1952 m M I (78177135 JFfiFQLLSoTL J. J. FERGUSON RESCUE APPARATUS April 16, 19.57

4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Feb. 4, 1952 JZLTIIGS .jfFerquson,

nited States RESCUE APPARATUS James I. Ferguson, New York, N. Y., assignor to Jerome A. Rooney, New York, N. Y.

The present invention relates to rescue apparatus and particularly to a device in the general nature of a stretcher which has a universal application in rescue operations.

Many types of rescue apparatus have been devised but in the past many types of rescue operations could not be performed with a single piece of apparatus, some apparatus being adapted to one type of operation, some to another. Thus the commonly used stretcher having rigid side members is not adapted to operations requiring the turning of sharp corners. Nor is it adapted to operations wherein vertical transportation or removal over rough terrain is involved.

Also, such types of devices as the Stokes litter and army type stretcher have been frequently used but also have many limitations For example, these devices cannot be used where an accident victim is in a location with limited head room since they have either upstanding sides or legs making is impossible to place the victim in the litter without first moving him to a place where there is sufiicient head room to perform the operation, especially if the victim be obese. Nor is the Stokes type usable when the victim is unusually tall.

Additionally, most types of rescue device in common use are rigid and cannot be readily transported, and if the entire device is not rigid there are still rigid members which are necessary to the use of the device.

There are, of course, situations wherein it is necessary that the device be rigid. For example, it may be that the person to be transported has a broken back or broken neck. The present device, unlike the ordinary ambulance stretcher, is provided with a means whereby it may be rendered rigid when necessary.

Commonly used devices such as the Stokes litter or the army type stretcher previously mentioned have the limitation that they cannot be readily used in other than F the horizontal position and consequently situations frequently arise where it is impossible to turn a corner. The device of my invention is adapted to use as a chair litter and may therefore be utilized in many situations where sharp corners make the use of other types impossible.

Situations also frequently arise where an accident victim has suffered a fracture of a limb and it is essential that the fractured member be placed in traction at the earliest possible moment. My device is provided with readily operable means whereby such traction may be exerted.

It is an object of my invention to provide a rescue device which is universally useful and which is so designed as to be readily operable.

It is another object of my invention to provide a rescue device adapted for use when it is necessary to lower or raise the device vertically or substantially vertically.

It is another object of my invention to provide a device whi-ch, while usable in a vertical position for raising and lowering operations, may still be utilized in the normal carrying operation or for raising and lowering opera tions in a horizontal position.

It is another object of my invention to provide a rescue device having elements designed to enclose the victim and protect him fromweather, falling debris, and the like, while at the same time providing ample space for ingress of air and leaving the face exposed so that the victim, if conscious, will not be psychologically affected by being completely enclosed.

It is a still further object of the invention to render the enclosing means adjustable in such a manner that the rescue device may form a complete enclosure for use particularly in case the person transported is already dead.

It is a still further object of my invention to provide a means for exerting traction upon a broken limb of a victim to be transported in the device.

Other objects and features of the invention will be apparent when the following description is considered in connection with the annexed drawings, in which:

Figure l is a top plan view of the device in its closed condition but ready for use, that is, unrolled rather than rolled for transportation purposes;

Figure 2 is a bottom plan view of the device in the same condition as described in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a top plan View of the device in its open condition save that certain of the flaps are still closed, these flaps being shown open by dotted lines;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of the device of Figure 3, the view being taken on the plane of the line 4-4 of Figure 3;

Figure 5 is a perspective View showing the device rolled up and inserted in its carrying bag;

Figure 6 is a fragmentary view of the lower portion of the rescue device showing the means for anchoring the feet of the victim so that the rescue bag may be used in Work involving vertical transportation;

Figure 7 is a fragmentary plan view of the device showing the use thereof for applying traction to a broken leg; and

Figure 8 is a fragmentary view of the upper portion of the device showing the mode of immobilizing the head of the victim such as would be utilized in the event the victim had a broken neck.

Referring now to the drawings, and particularly to Figure 4, the device comprises two layers of material It) and 11 which material may, for example, be heavy waterproof canvas. The layer 10 is wrapped around a heavy rope 12 at each edge the edge portion being stitched to the main portion of the fabric 10 to completely enclose the rope l2 andcause the rope to be firmly held at the edges of the layer 10 of the material. The stitching also passes through the layer of material 11 as well as through the flap portions 13 and 14.

The rope 12, as seen in Figures 1 through 3, is continuous, extending along the edges of the device from the foot portion thereof to the apex at the head. The rope thus reinforces the edges and provides a gripping means at all points therealong. At the apex of the device there is a steel ring 15 which ring is whipped to the fabric layers lib and 11. Extending downwardly from the ring 15 along a center line of the device is a reinforcing webbing strip 16 which strip terminates about onethird of the way to the foot of the device. This strip 16 is sewn to the fabric layer 10 on the rear surface thereof and serves to distribute force exerted on the ring 15 to the fabric.

This manner of distributing the load to the fabric assures that the device will not curl about its longitudinal center. Moreover, since the apex of the rope 12 passes over the upper edge of the ring 15, if there should be any failure of the whipping or stitching by which the ring is held to the fabric layers the rope 12 would then take a portion of the load.

ares-ps Extending upwardly at an angle to the reinforcing strip 16 are two pairs of reinforcing strips 17 and 18. Each of these pairs is sewn to the. rear surface of the fabric liland eachis formed-from :a singlestrip of fabric thus providing the handles wanditt. These fabric strips in addition to forming handles, as stated, likewise serve to distribute loadplaced upon the ring 15 to the body of the fabric 14).

As .has previously been mentioned, the basic structure thus far described is provided with flaps 13 and M which flaps are sewn tothe edges of thefabricstrips l0 and ll. These flaps l3 and Mare designed to serve as covers for a victirnplaced upon the fabric layer 10. lnaddition to the'flaps 14 and 13 there is provided a footflap 21 which is stitched to the fabric layers .10 and llrand to the flaps lisandv Malongits lower'e'dge. The flap zlis, as indicated, particularly intended for covering the feet and lower legs of the victim. Both the side flaps and foot flaps are adjustable to :pronerly'cover persons "of diverse physical characteristics-ohm or fat. short or tall.

Each of the fiaps'1'3 and 14 is provided with a diagonally folded portion which maybe termed a secondary flap designated respectively 22. and 23, see Figure 3. Flaps Z2 and 23am normally not utilized in covering a victim, but would be used inthe-cvent that the person transported is already dead or, in some instances, when due to falling debris it is necessary to protect the head of .the victim.

Fixed tothe front or upper surface of the fabric layer It) is a foldable'hood .24 which comprises a generally rectangular fabric member having f lds therein as indicated at 25 and '26 to form a hood, which has a secondary flap 29. Hood 24- may be utilized to cover the head in the event of inclement weather or of falling debris, or hood 24, together with flap 29, may cover the face and head.

Likewise stitched to the fabric'ltl at a point corresponding to the chest area of the body to be transported is-a strap 27 which is stitched along a portion only of its length the two ends being left free so that the body may be encircled by the stra which is provided with a buckle 28 of any suitable'kind. .Strap 27 may be used as a traction anchor'for'broken arms and also maintaining the position and preventing shifting of a person transported.

Spaced along the length of the device are carrying handles or loops .39. these handles being formed of webbing which extends entirely across the device being stitched to the up er surface of the lower layer 11 of fabric material. That'is. each pair of handles .31 one on either side of the device, forms. in addition, two reinforcing straps extending completely across the device.

The"device'can readily be converted into a litter for trans ortation over rough terrainby inserting saplings orpoles of approximately ten 'foot len ths through the loops l9 and 3t and 2t and '30. In this connection it should'be noticed that the loops l9 and 29 are longer than the loops 30 so that poles inserted through the various loops on'opposite sides of the device will extendsubstantiallv parallel to the longitudinal axis.

The 'uppermost'pair of loops 3i and the lowermost pair of loops 30 maybe utilized in cooperation with a pair of slings to convert the'device into a basket type carrier'which may be then utilized in a substantially horizontal position for raising andlowering operations. That is,'a ropesling would extend through the uppermost and lowermost loops'irll on each side of thedevice, the four eyes in which the two rope slings terminate tbeingthen placed on .the hook of a block and tackle or a similar device to "effect the raising'or lowering operation.

The straps 3d are 'iocated'at'carefully selected areas in order to'makeit possible to utilize the'device as a chair litter. Thus the upper pair of straps litl is locatedin the area of the shoulder blades and the second pair in the area'of the buttocks whereby carriers of the device-may readily cause it to assume the shape of a ch'air in -order terial- 44to1the fabric layer il.

4 to turn sharp corners which it would otherwise be impossible to do.

Straps may also be utilized in the event that the device is to be lowered down a ladder. In this case, short lengths of board or pole are inserted through loops of the uppermost straps 3i} and likewise through the loops of the straps 36, third from the top in the region of the thighs. These form rigid supports which may rest on the rails of the ladder so thata'person may be lowered down the ladder without interference with the ladder rungs. Furthermore, the board or pole lengths may be adjusted to the width of the ladder whereby a ladder of any standard width may be utilized as the guidingrnember.

The fabric layer ll extends to arpoint adjacent the head area and there terminates, being stitched to the fabric it? only along its edges and not at its top or bottom. There is thus formed a poc ct into which a rigid member or members may be inserted so as to make it possible'to transporta victim who has met with an accident'requiring that the back :area be immobilized, for example, one who ha'sxsustained a broken back or neck. Theretis no necessity of providing ampermanen'trigid member since therezis seldom if ever a 'situation'where it isnotpossibleto secure a' board or like device as forexamples pi ce of baseboard or a door jambior a portion ofaidesk toact as asplint. In Figures 2.and4 thesplin't is shown as :cornprised ofthree boards 39.

Means aretprovidedfor holding the flaps 13 and 14 in. closed position, and for holding aperson in placein the device or on the device. These means comprise webbing strapsfil adaptedito. extend transversely oflthe device'above'zthe. foldedfflaps. The straps "31 are made adjustable .by ameans iof buckles 32 which buckles are astened tothe margin of the device by means of short lengths of 'strapw33. At the opposite side of the device four cooperating rings 34 are positioned, being secured tothe fabriclthrough the'me-diumof shortlengths of strap 35. .Each ofathe straps .31 passes through an eye-36 in a snap l1ook:37,.the hook beingadapted to cooperate with the ring 34. In this manner the straps may be rapidly. loosened or put in place while at the same time they are adjustable byuse of the buckle 32.

Although strapsfil. are shown as passing directly across the device, they maybe crossed in a diagonal fashion toprevent pressure on an area which has been injured. In ."theeventofinjury in the chest area, forexarnple, the two upperv strap 33 would .be crossed over each other toxprevent pressure on .theiniured portion lot? the chest.

In abrnanner similar to that described above for the fastening of the hooks 37 and the buckles 32 .pairs of ringsdllsare fastened to the fabric, one pair in the chest area and one in the foot area. The pairs'of rings 40 in .the '.Cl1SlI area are'intended foruse in applying tractionas will vbe. hereinafter explained, While those in the foot area are forsa purpose to be described.

When such vertical lowering or lifting is to be performed, it is desirable that the person being rescued be firmly anchored-within the enclosure formed by the various flaps hereinbefore described so that he cannot by any chancemove vertically and slide out of the device. 'For this purpose twostraps 41. are provided, which-straps are provided with buckles 42 for adjusting the length thereof, 'rthe'tstraps passing through an anchor ring 43 which is secured by a short piece of webbing or like ma Each strap 41 is alSO provided twith..a snap hook 45 adapted to cooperate with one of the lower pair of rings iii. Thus 'tlie straps '41.:may rbe crossed over-beneath and above the :feet'and fixed torthbtings All thereby forming a support 'for the feet, which will: assure thexsafety of the rescue operation involvingverticaltransportation. In Figure 6, for clarity of illustration,therfiapsvllii, Mare shown folded under the legs, but ordinarily theseffiaps would cover the legs.

As willtibe. obvious,ithetidevice'lthus fardescribednlay I be utilized in all the manners 'sdescribecl lfor both adults and children. In the event, for example, that a child is to be transported in a horizontal position the child may be laid on the open device and the flaps folded as heretofore described after which the entire base of the device may be again folded upwardly before the straps 31 are fastened. This will serve to reduce the size of the device to that of the child so that it may be readily carried. Furthermore, if the child is to be lowered or raised in a vertical position the straps 41 may again be utilized, in this event being fastened to the upper ones of the two pairs of rings 40 rather than to the lower ones.

The ring 43 is also utilized for various other purposes, thus in the event that it is necessary, due to the lack of head room, to slide the rescue device across the floor or along the ground, a rope may be attached to this ring 43 and the device pulled feet first by this means, and if necessary it is even possible to lower the entire device by attaching a rope to the ring 43 although generally speaking it is preferable that lowering or raising operations be not performed with the victims head pointed downward.

Should the victim have a compound fracture of a leg one of the straps 41 may be removed from the ring 43 and a loop thereof placed about the injured leg at the thigh area, the strap being attached to that one of the upper pair of rings 40 on the side of the fractured member. This strap then holds the torso firmly in place. The second of the straps 41 is then wrapped about the foot, passed through the ring 43, and tightened to put a pull on the leg to thereby place the leg in traction, preventing further injury as a result of such a compound fracture. This arrangement is shown in Figure 7. In this figure the person being rescued is shown lying on the folded flaps rather than beneath them. However, it is entirely possible to utilize traction with the flaps over the victim save that the foot flap 21 must be placed beneath the legs rather than over them.

Straps 41 are sutficiently long so that an arm having a compound fracture may betreated in similar manner by looping one of the straps 41 about the wrist and through the ring 43 and tightening it. Chest strap 27 serves as the anchor for application of arm traction.

Referring now to Figure 8, there is shown therein a mode of utilizing the device to hold the head in a fixed position which is sometimes essential, as for example, when the victim has a broken neck. In this arrangement a blanket, indicated at 46, is rolled army pack manner and inserted beneath the head cover or hood 24. This forms a pocket in which the head rests and which provents shifting movements thereof with respect to the torso which, of course, is firmly held in place by means of the strap 27. If a head pillow is required a blanket is placed beneath hood 24.

The rescue pack of my invention may also be used for carrying by a single carrier. The pack may he stood in a vertical position, the rescuer then placing his back against the victims back and, by grasping the upper ones of the loops 30, can carry the casualty.

The rescue pack as described hereinabove is usable in many situations where other types fail. In addition to the situations already mentioned, such problems of vertical transportation as arise when mine shafts, dumbwaiters, etc. have to be utilized are readily solved with this device. Such devices as the Stokes litter and the arm stretcher are not usable for example in a dumbwaiter since their rigidity prevents the insertion thereof through the dumbwaiter doors as does the thickness brought about by the upstanding sides or the legs. Moreover the army type stretcher is stretched into its position of use by means of toggle members which members are readily displaced during vertical movement of the device causing the stretcher to collapse. As indicated, the device of my invention obviates such difiiculties.

While I have described the preferred'form of my invention, it will be understood that many modifications of the structure may be made within the scope of the invention. Therefore I wish to be limited not by the foregoing description, but on the contrary, solely by the claims granted to me.

What is claimed is:

1. In a rescue device of the class described, in combination, a generally rectangular piece of fabric, said fabric coming to a point at one end and being gradually tapered toward the opposite end to form an outline generally that of a recumbent person to be transported, a second fabric piece underlying said first piece and fixed thereto at its side margins, said second fabric piece reinforcing the first and forming with said first piece an open ended pocket to receive a splint, a rope extending along the top and side margins of the device and fixed to both said fabric layers, said rope forming a hand hold, a plurality of carrying straps extending transversely of said device in pairs, each pair forming a loop at each of the opposite edges of said device, said reinforcing and carrying straps being connected to the lower layer of fabric throughout the transverse extent thereof and being also connected to the upper fabric layer at the edges of that layer, and serving to reinforce the fabric, a load carrying ring fixed to both said fabric layers adjacent the upper point thereof, and a pair of covering flaps secured to said fabric layers at the margins thereof, said covering flaps being adapted to fold over said fabric and extending approximately to the shoulders of a person to be transported on the device.

2. A device as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that said covering flaps terminate at their upper edges along lines inclined diagonally across the device and that said covering flaps have secondary flaps secured thereto along said diagonally inclined lines, said secondary flaps when in their unfolded position serving to cover the face and head of a person to be transported on the device.

3. A device as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that a ring is secured to the underlying fabric piece adjacent the lower edge thereof and approximately on the longitudinal center line and additional pairs of rings are secured to the side margins of the overlying piece of fabric, one pair adjacent the chest area of a person to be transported and the other adjacent the foot area, said rings being adapted to receive adjustable straps for anchoring the feet of a person to be transported in place and for anchoring the person to be transported in position with traction applied to a fractured limb.

4. In a rescue device for supporting a body to be transported comprising a substantially rectangular first member, comprising a heavy waterproof fabric and having a head portion and a foot portion and converging at the head portion into an apex, a rope extending the full length of said fabric from the foot portion to the head portion to said apex and secured to all the edges of said canvas for reinforcing all the edges and for providing a gripping means at all points thereon, a load-receiving metallic member at the apex of said member, a first rein forcing member extending from said load receiving metallic member longitudinally along said first member for distributing the forces exerted on said load receiving me tallic member to prevent curling of said first member along its longitudinal center when load is applied thereto, said rope extending to and being secured to said load receiving metallic member for taking a portion of the load, a plurality of reinforcing strips extending angularly from said first reinforcing member for forming handles and also for distributing the load on said first load receiving member, flaps extending along the long edges of said first member and foldable over said first member to serve as covers, a foot flap extending along the foot portion of said first member and foldable thereover to serve as a cover, a foldable hood comprising a substantially rectangular element having folds secured to the head portio n of said first member to form a hood, a

QWSSWSO strap "securedto said first-"member in the fgeneral chest area of abody to besupported'on -said first membenand adapted toibe-secured-to aportion-of said bo'dy for-providing traction thereto, a plurality of handles extending from both edges of said first member and formed- -of Webbing extending entirely across said "first-member for reinforcing said first "member, an of said" handles-being constructed to receive rigid pole-members-along'theedges of said first member in a directionsubstantiallyparallel to the longitudinal axis thereof, a second member so cured to said first mentioned member =along the edges thereof-from-said foot portion to -a point adjacent the he'ad portion to form apoclret for supporting-a iigid'cle ment,'a plurality of wcbbing strips secured to and extending transversely across said first 'member-an'd above said fiapsfor' holding a body to betranspc'rted-cn said ltirst member in place, adjustable fastening means on said strips, elements securedto 'the' 'fabric of sa'idTfirst-mcmher for applying traction thereat andaddi'tional strip members-at the foot portionadjustableinlen'gth'ifor supporting the feet of a body to'be;.transpo1-ted.

5. Ina rescue device for supporting za body -to 'be transported comprising a substantially rectangular 'Efirst member comprising adreavy fabric and having a head portion and a foot portion and converging at the head portion into an apex, a rope -extending the full length of said fabric from the foot portion to --the headportion to said apexand secured to all "the edges oftsaid'canvas for reinfcrcingall the edges andforproviding-a' gripping means at all points thereon, a looped load receiving metallic member at the apex of said firstmember, a first reinforcing member extending'fromsaid load receiving metallic v member longitudinally along said first member for distributing the forccs exerted on said load receiving metallic member to prevent-curling of saidriirstmember along its longitudinal center when-lload is applied thereto,

7 said rope extending totand being-secured .to said load receiving metallic member'fortakinga portion ofthe load, a plurality of reinforcing stripsextending angularly from said first reinforcing member :for forming handles and also for distributing the load on said load receiving metallic member, a strap secured to said-first member'in the :general chest area of the body :to be transported on said first .member for securement to a portion of said body for providing traction theretoyaplurality. (if-handles extending from both edges of said first 'membenall ofsaid handles being constructed to' receive rigid "pole members along the edges of'said first member. in a directionsub stantially parallel to the longitudinal ax-is thereof, --a plurality of strips secured toand extending transversely a'crosssaid first member and above said' fiapsfor-holding the body .to be transported in place, adjustable fastening means on said strips, elements secured to 'said fabric-for applying traction 'thereat and additional-strip members at :the loot portion adjustablein lengthim supporting the feet of'a body to be transported.

6. In arescue device for supporting a bodyto'be transported comprising a substantially 'rectangul'anfirst -11161T1- ber comprisinga heavy .fabrictandthaving al head portion and a foot portion and convergingIat-the headportion into apex, a rope extending the full length of-said fabric from the foot-portioirto the head'portionto said apex and secured to all the edges 'ofsaid canvas fOlvlB- inforcing all the edges and ..for providing a gripping means .at all :points thereon, -a looped load receiving metallies member at .thelapex .of .said Lfirst member, a first reinforcing. member extending from: said load receiving metallic member longitudinally along sa' ZfiISt member for distributing the forcesiexertedron'saidload receiving metallic member'itoprevent.curling' of said first member along its longitudinal center When loa'd is applied thereto, said trope :extending to and being secured to saidload receiving metallic member-tor taking a portion of the load, a plurality of reinforcingstrips extending--=angularly from-said first re intorcing member for forming handles and also "for distributing the load 'on' said load receiving metallic member, 2a plurality' of handles extending from both-edges ofsaid 'iirst member, webbing-extending entirely across said firstmemberfor-reinforcing said-first rnembeigallof said handles being constructed ito-receive rigid pole members along theedgesof said first member in -a direction substantially parallel to -the longitudinal axis thereof, and strap-members at the' fo'ot portion-adjustab'lein lengthier supporting'the feet of a body to "be transported.

7. in a rescue device for supporting a-body to'be transported comprising a substantiallyrectangular first member comprising a fabric and having a head portion and a foot portion and converging-at the head portion into an a-rope extending the full length "of said fabric irom the'ioot portion'to the hea'd portion to said apex and secured to all theedges of said fabric forweinforcing all vthe-edges and for providinga gripping-means at all'points thereon, a load receiving :metallic member at the apex of said .rnember, :a first'reinforcing member extending from said load receiving metallic member longitudinally along said first member for distributing thevforces exerted on said load receiving metallic member toprevent curling of said first member along its longitudinal center when load is applied thereto, said rope extending to land being secured to said load receiving etallic member fortaking a portion of theload, a'plurality of reinforcing strips extending :angularly fromzsaid firstreinforcingmember.for forming handles and also for distributing the load on said load receivingmetallic member, flaps extending. along the long edges of said first member vand foldable over said'firstlrnember to serve as :covers, afoot flap extendingnalongpthe foot portion of said first memberand loldable thereoverito serve .as'a cover, a i'oldable hood comprising a substantially rectangular member .havingcfo'ldssecured to the head portion of said first member to form a hood, a strap securedito said first member in the general chestarea of a body adapted to be transported and securableto a portion of said body for providing traction thereto, asplura'lity of handles extending from both edges of said first member extending entirely across said first member for reinforcing said "first member, all of .saidhandles being constructed toreceive rigid pole members along the edges of said first member in a direction substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis tiereof, a plurality of strips .secured to and extending transversely across saidifirstgmember andabove said flaps forholding the body to :beztransportedvin place, adjustable fastening meanson said: strips,

members secured to said fabric for applying traction thereat and additional strip members at the foot portion adjustable in length for supporting the feet of'thezbody to be transported.

8. in a rescue device for supporting a body to be transported comprising a substantially rectangular-first member comprising-a fabric and having ahead portion and a foot portion and converging at the head portion into an apex, a ropevexten ding the full length of said fabric from the foot portion to the head portion to said apex and secured'to all the edgesof saidfabric for reinforcingall the edges and for providing a gripping means at all points thereon, a looped load receiving metallic member .at the apex of said member, a first reinforcing member extending from said load receiving metallic memberlongitndinal'ly along said first member for distributing the forcesexerted on said load receiving metallic member to prevent curling .oflsa'id first member along itslongitudinul center whensload is applied thereto, said rope extending to and being'secured to said load re-- ceiving metallic member for taking a portion of the load, a plurality of reinforcing strips extendingangularly from said first reinforcing member for forming handles and also for distributingthe load on said load receiving. me-

edges-"of said first'meniber for reinforcing said member,

all of said handles being constructed to receive rigid pole members along the edges of said first member in a direction substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof, a plurality of strips secured to and extending transversely across said first member for holding a body adapted to be transported in place, adjustable fastening means on said strips, members secured to said fabric for applying traction thereat and additional strip members at the foot portion adjustable in length for supporting the feet of the body to be transported.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNlTED STATES PATENTS Woods Sept. 17, 1867 Martinson Apr. 14, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain 1869 Great Britain July 17, 1931 Germany Apr. 13, 1931

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US68927 *Sep 17, 1867 Improved hammook
US2279694 *Mar 11, 1941Apr 14, 1942June H PiperStretcher
DE522691C *Dec 5, 1929Apr 13, 1931Otto KohnTragsack
GB352496A * Title not available
GB186904307A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2899692 *Jul 13, 1955Aug 18, 1959 finken
US2986202 *May 27, 1959May 30, 1961Yates Vivian DPillow holder
US3158875 *Sep 5, 1962Dec 1, 1964Citizens Nat Bank Of LubbockInvalid stretcher
US3708810 *Oct 6, 1970Jan 9, 1973P MerikallioProtective blanket
US3750202 *Oct 6, 1970Aug 7, 1973P MerikallioSleeping bag
US4601075 *May 7, 1985Jul 22, 1986Smith J RudyEmergency stretcher
US4675925 *Apr 3, 1986Jun 30, 1987Henrietta LittletonDevice for manipulating bedridden patients
US4872226 *Jun 6, 1988Oct 10, 1989Robert LonardoMeans for positioning bedfast patients
US4970739 *Dec 15, 1989Nov 20, 1990Bradford John GStretcher
US5005231 *Sep 27, 1989Apr 9, 1991Robert Lonardo, Trustee Of The Robert Lonardo Living Trust AgreementMeans for positioning bedfast patients
US5014374 *Feb 24, 1989May 14, 1991Williams Gary RRestraint stretcher
US5014724 *May 29, 1990May 14, 1991Miller Larry CPediatric immobilization device
US5016299 *Jan 24, 1990May 21, 1991Claude BoulangerEmergency evacuation harness
US5121514 *Dec 10, 1990Jun 16, 1992Lifeport, Inc.Emergency support device with flexible polyethylene sheet
US5150487 *Feb 11, 1992Sep 29, 1992Hemco Industries Pty. Ltd.Evacuation restraint
US5190055 *Mar 27, 1992Mar 2, 1993Connor Wayne ODevice for restraining a person
US5317770 *Oct 30, 1992Jun 7, 1994Cappy Sakurai U.S.A., Inc.Emergency stretcher and temporary bed
US5729850 *May 30, 1995Mar 24, 1998Tarpaulin KyStretcher
US5787529 *Sep 24, 1997Aug 4, 1998Landes; Raymond J.Rescue carrier device
US5839137 *Nov 12, 1997Nov 24, 1998Butler; Robert O.Roll up emergency personnel carrier
US5978989 *Jan 28, 1998Nov 9, 1999Chavez; Manuel GarciaFlexible patient transporter with foot pocket
US6052877 *May 27, 1997Apr 25, 2000Creature Wares Ltd.Pet burial container
US6220264 *Mar 10, 1998Apr 24, 2001Terrelogic, Inc.Suspension tent
US6574840 *Jan 3, 2002Jun 10, 2003Rosemary C. DoppelPet burial kit
US6871368 *Sep 10, 2003Mar 29, 2005Carston R. CalkinEmergency drag stretcher
US6908131 *May 17, 2001Jun 21, 2005Sm & Jb Enterprises, Inc.Aid for lifting and carrying a mass/object
US7302723Jun 21, 2004Dec 4, 2007Michael Joseph DeanFire rescue belt
US7610641 *Nov 23, 2005Nov 3, 2009Grant FrostRescue device
US8214950 *Jul 21, 2010Jul 10, 2012Topaz Peter ACarrying sling for a person
US8261383Aug 12, 2008Sep 11, 2012Airbus Operations, S.L.Device for rescue from the interior of a confined space through a manhole, method of utilization thereof and uses
US8286284Feb 2, 2008Oct 16, 2012MFT Internal Inc.Rapid intervention drag stretcher devices
US8333392 *May 1, 2012Dec 18, 2012Wolf Bryan ALightweight plastic sleds for emergency transport and hauling of loads
US8336141 *May 10, 2007Dec 25, 2012Cho Kee WongRescuing and carrying device
US8365326Feb 4, 2010Feb 5, 2013Christopher KenaltyEvacuation sled for non-ambulatory patients
US8640288 *Mar 5, 2008Feb 4, 2014Paper-Pak IndustriesDisposable transporter
US8677530 *Jul 2, 2013Mar 25, 2014Skedco, Inc.Rescue stretcher with securement straps
US8881327 *Feb 1, 2013Nov 11, 2014Christopher KenaltyEvacuation sled for non-ambulatory patients
US8898839 *Apr 20, 2012Dec 2, 2014Evacusled Inc.Evacuation sled
US8991835Dec 17, 2012Mar 31, 2015Arc Products, LlcLightweight plastic sleds for emergency transport and hauling of loads
US9022134 *Oct 4, 2011May 5, 2015Skedco, Inc.Fire-resistant rescue blanket
US9173789May 21, 2012Nov 3, 2015MFT Internal Inc.Rapid intervention rescue device
US9283129 *Jun 1, 2015Mar 15, 2016Douglas R. PiferRescue life system
US9480613 *Dec 3, 2014Nov 1, 2016Sheila LackeyPatient support system
US20040004367 *May 17, 2001Jan 8, 2004Main Steven C.Aid for lifting and carrying a mass/object
US20040088794 *Sep 10, 2003May 13, 2004Calkin Carston R.Emergency drag stretcher
US20040255366 *Jun 21, 2004Dec 23, 2004Dean Michael JosephFire rescue belt
US20050204470 *May 12, 2005Sep 22, 2005Sm & Jb Enterprises Inc.Aid for lifting and carrying a mass/object
US20060137097 *Nov 23, 2005Jun 29, 2006Grant FrostRescue device
US20080184488 *Feb 2, 2008Aug 7, 2008Fee Thomas JRapid intervention drag stretcher devices
US20090038076 *Aug 9, 2007Feb 12, 2009Giduck John PFlexible litter
US20090193588 *Aug 12, 2008Aug 6, 2009Alberto Merino RodriguezDevice for rescue from the interior of a confined space through a manhole, method of utilization thereof and uses
US20090313759 *May 10, 2007Dec 24, 2009Cho Kee WongA Rescuing and Carrying Device
US20090314321 *Jun 24, 2008Dec 24, 2009Van Dyken John JPolygonal Tarp for Debris Removal
US20100005593 *Aug 6, 2007Jan 14, 2010Bowling FLightweight Roll-Up Drag Litter
US20100011506 *Mar 5, 2008Jan 21, 2010Ronald JensenDisposable transporter
US20110185504 *Feb 4, 2010Aug 4, 2011Christopher KenaltyEvacuation sled for non-ambulatory patients
US20130084435 *Oct 4, 2011Apr 4, 2013Skedco, Inc.Fire-resistant rescue blanket
US20130139319 *Feb 1, 2013Jun 6, 2013Christopher KenaltyEvacuation sled for non-ambulatory patients
US20130276227 *Apr 20, 2012Oct 24, 2013Evacusled Inc.Evacuation sled
DE102006032863A1 *Jul 14, 2006Jan 17, 2008Marion MohrSystem for carrying sick and injured people comprises a carrying cloth with a foot part and connecting components fixed to the towel for forming a connection and arranged on the foot part of the towel
DE102006032863B4 *Jul 14, 2006Aug 20, 2009Marion MohrVerlagerungssystem
DE102014016509A1 *Nov 10, 2014May 12, 2016Thyssenkrupp AgRettungstrage
DE102014213081A1 *Jul 4, 2014Jan 7, 2016Hubert Gockel-BöhnerTransport- und/oder Auflagematte
EP0152349A2 *Feb 6, 1985Aug 21, 1985André PetitetCanvas stretcher to lift and to carry a human body
EP0152349A3 *Feb 6, 1985Sep 25, 1985Andre PetitetCanvas stretcher to lift and to carry a human body
EP2962671A1Jun 30, 2015Jan 6, 2016Hubert J. Gockel-BöhnerTransport and/or support mat, in particular x-ray table support
WO1981000672A1 *Sep 8, 1980Mar 19, 1981Hemco Ind PtyEvacuation restraint for bedridden patients
WO1985003431A1 *Feb 6, 1985Aug 15, 1985Petitet AndreCloth carrier intended to the lift and transfer of a human body
WO1991018576A1 *May 28, 1991Dec 12, 1991Wendy Jane MurphyPatient evacuation envelope
WO1992010155A1 *Dec 6, 1991Jun 25, 1992Lifeport, Inc.Emergency support device
WO1995033430A1 *May 30, 1995Dec 14, 1995Tarpaulin KyStretcher
WO2008019331A2 *Aug 6, 2007Feb 14, 2008Tactical Medical Solutions, Inc.Lightweight roll-up drag litter
WO2009095510A1 *Dec 9, 2008Aug 6, 2009Airbus España, S.L.Device for rescuing people from a small enclosed space via manholes and method for using and uses of same
WO2011095881A1 *Feb 4, 2011Aug 11, 2011Evacusled Inc.Evacuation sled for non-ambulatory patients
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/628, 5/122, 5/416
International ClassificationA61G1/00, A61G1/01
Cooperative ClassificationA61G1/01
European ClassificationA61G1/01