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Publication numberUS2788827 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1957
Filing dateJun 26, 1953
Priority dateJun 26, 1953
Publication numberUS 2788827 A, US 2788827A, US-A-2788827, US2788827 A, US2788827A
InventorsBanner Edwin B
Original AssigneeReeve & Mitchell Mfg Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flatware case
US 2788827 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

j wir April 16, 1957 Filed June 26, 1955 E. B. BANNER FLATWARE CASE 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

E. B. BANNER FLATWARE CASE April 16, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 26, 1955 INVENToR. 50W/N E BAN/weze Dif 07' RNEX E. B. BANNER FLATWARE: CASE prl 16, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet AZ5 Filed June 26, 1953 INVENTOR. 50W/N 5. BAN/V52 BY A r 70E/viv.

l4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR.

m N M B 5. w W E E. E. BANNER FLATWAREI CASE April 16, 1957 Filed June 26, 1955 nited States Patenty FLATWARE CASE Edwin B. Banner, Haddontield, N. J., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Reeve & Mitchell Mfg. Co., Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application rune ze, 195s, serial No. 364,246 s Claims. (ci. o-sz) The present invention comprises a flatware case for all types of atware, and relates more particularly to a flatware case for silver atware such as sterling silver or plated atware, readily subject to tarnishing, wherein multiple place-settings may be conveniently stored and retained when not in use.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a atware case for domestic use, in which a plurality of place-settings may be stored and encased.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a flatware case which will permit convenient and ready access to its contents.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a flatware case in which the contents thereof can be maintained in a tarnish-free condition, and in which scratching and abrasion of the atware contents are avoided.

With the above objects in view, together withV other objects which will appear more fully from the following description and accompanying drawings, the present invention contemplates a multi-compartmented flatware case comprising a generally rectangular base having front, rear and side walls extending generally upward therefrom. A plurality of atware-retaining partitions of form-retaining material is provided within the case intermediate the front and rear walls thereof and positioned in generally parallel planes in respect thereto when the case is closed. The width of each of the atware-retaining partitions is somewhat less than the internal width of the case and each partition is pivotally hinged in respect to the base. The clearance between the edges of the partition and the side walls permits pivotal movement of the partitions within the case. Each separator is provided with a fabric covering, preferably a tarnish-inhibiting silver cloth on at least one face, preferably the forward face. Flatware-retaining elements such as pockets are formed from the fabric to retain the atware within the case. The case is provided with a case-closing cover extending from the rear wall over the tops of the atware retaining partitions, the case-closing cover engaging with the upper portion of the front wall of the case.

For the purpose of illustrating the4 invention, there are shown in the accompanying drawings forms thereof which are at present preferred, although it is to be understood that the various instrumentalities of which the invention consists can be variously arranged and organized and that the invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and organizations of the instrumentalities as herein shown and described.

Figure l represents a perspective view of a atware case embodying the present invention in closed position.

Figure 2 represents a perspective view of the flatware case of Figure 1 shown in open position.

Figire 3 is a fragmentary perspective View showing the atware-retaining partitions carrying flatware.

Figure 4 is a vertical cross-sectional view of. the atware case of Figure 1. v

2,788,827 g j Patentednpr. 16,1957,

Figure 5 is a plan cross-sectional view of the flatware case of Figure 1 taken on line 5 5 of Figure 4, the flatware not being shownin section but in perspective view as seen from above.

Figure 6 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the dinner atware case of my invention in closed position.

Figure 7 is a perspective view of the atware case of Figure 6, shown in open position.

Figure 8 is a fragmentary perspective view of the flatware-retaining partitions, mounted on platform, of the embodiment of the atware case Yof my invention shown in Figures 6 and 7.

Figure 9 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the tlatware case of Figure 6.

Figure 10 is a plancross-sectional view of the fiatware case of Figure 6, taken on line 10-10 of Figure 9, the atware not being shown in section but in perspective view as seen from above.

As shown in Figures 1 through 5, the atware case of the present invention comprises a box or case 18. In the embodiment shown in Figures 1 through 5 the box is prepared from ilexible form-retaining material, such as cardboard, covered withfcloth or paper, having a generally rectangular base 30 with rear wall 20, side walls 22 and 24 and front wall 28 extending generally perpendicularly upward therefrom. Side walls 22 and 24 slope downward from thevupper edge 26 (see Figure 2) of rear wall 20. Alternatively, the rear wall 20 and front Wall 28 may be` of form-retaining material, with the side walls 22 and 24 of exible material, such as cloth, in which case the side walls 22 and 24 may be gusseted. y

Front wall 28 is pivotally hingedto base 30 of silver atware case 18 at its lower edge and'can be pivoted in respect thereto. Front wall 28 is normally urged to the open position shown in Figure 2, wherein it is not engaged with sidewalls 22 and 24. Alternatively, front wall 28 may be `engaged by means of a gusset with side walls 22 and 24 when in open position.

Cover 32 of the ilatware case is pivotally hinged at the upper edge 26 of rear wall 20. Cover 32 is closely adjacent such as contiguous to or engaged with the upper edges of side walls 22 and 24 and frontwall 28. As shown in Figure 4, inthe embodiment shown in the drawings, when cover 32 is in closed position (see also Figure .1), front wall 28, which extends upv/ard 'for a distance above the front corner of the upper edge of side walls 22 and 24 is covered by the overlap 36 of cover 32 so that front wall 28 is retained in position by operative engagement with front` edges of side walls 22 and 24 and forward tange 36 of cover 32.

Alternatively, cover 32 may be closelyadjacent the upper edge of front wall 28;` or front wall 28 may be pivoted inwardly between side walls 22 and 24, with its upper portion closely adjacent with cover 32.

Positioned within the atware case 18 are atwareretaining partitionsg38, 40,'A V42, 44 and 46. The partitions are narrower'than the internal width of flatware case 18, and are attached or hinged to base 30 by means of rear anges or' projections 48, 50, 52, 54 and 56,

. which project rearwardly fora major portion of the width of each partition, for a distance somewhat less than the distance separating the partitions. Flanges 48, 50, 52, 54 and 56 may be pasted to the base 30 as shown in Figures 3 and 4, or, if desired, may be stapled or sewn thereto. In place of flanges 48, 50, 52, 54 and 56, partitions 38, 40, 42, 44land 46 may be pivotally attached to base 30 byV other means, such as by means of Vcloth extensions sewn or stapled to the base 30.

Partitions 38; 40,42, 44 and '46 ycomprise separators or walls 37, 39,V 41, 43 and 45 of fom-retaining material, such as cardboard, paperboard or the like. In the instant embodiment, the separators or walls 37, 39, 41, 43 and 45 are integral with their respective anges 48, 50, 52, 54 and 56 but due to their flexible nature are pivotal inrespect thereto s o Ythat when the atware case V18 is opened as shown in'Figure 2, the partitions, such as partition 38 in Figure 2 (broken line) can be pivoted forward to permit ready access to the flatware retained in the subsequentpartitions. e Y

As seen in Figures 2 and 4, partitions 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 are graduated in size, the smallest partition 38 being adapted to receive the smallest of the flatware (butter spreaders 100) and thelargest of the partitions 46 adapted to receive the next to the largest of theiatware,`

(forks 108). The remaining partitions 40, 42 and 44 are graduated in progressively increased sizesand retain flatware of progressively increased size, namely tea spoons 102, salad forks 104 and cream soup spoons 106. VPreferably, each of the partitions bear printed matterat the upper portionof each atware-retaining partition designating the typeof atware to `be inserted therein, as seen in Figure 2, the printed matter in each case being readily read when the case is opened.

Referring, particularly to VFigures 3, 4, and it is seen that each of the form-retainingrwalls 37, 39, 41, 43 and 45 of respective partitions 38, 40, 42, 44 and 46 is parttially covered with a relatively thin layer of material comprising a flatware-retaining fabric covering, such as annel, plastic, etc. When the atware intended to be stored in the case comprises tarnishable metal such as silver, the fabric covering preferably comprises a conventional tarnish-inhibiting Vcloth known in the art as silver cloth.

Such silver cloth can be preparedby immersing a cloth, such as annel in an aqueous solution containing a water-soluble salt of a heavy metal, such as lead or` zinc, which preferentially absorbs hydrogen sulphide from the atmosphere more rapidly than metallic silver, and sub-A sequently drying the impregnated cloth. Thus, silverV cloth may be prepared by'impregnating Vannel with a solution of lead acetate, and permitting the lead acetate to dry and be retained in the fibers of the lannel. Y

In the illustrated embodiment of the invention which contemplates a preferred embodiment thereof, the silver cloth covers the front face of the separator of each partition and extends downwardly over a major portion of the rear face thereof. It is of course, to be understood, that if desired the silverV cloth can cover'the rear face of any or each partition, or cover a lesser portion of the rear face of any or each partition than shown in Figures 3 and 4.

- As seen in Figures 3 and 5 the silver cloth 58 for partition 38 is stitched at each end by means of stitches 60 and 62 to the form-retaining separator 37.

If desired, the silver cloth may be somewhat wider than the form-retaining separator 37 of partition 38 and the peripheral edges of silver cloth 58 can be sewn together'so as to obscure the peripheral edgesof the formretaining separator from view.

Silver cloth 58 is lapped in the front'portion and vertically stitched by means of vertical stitches 64 to form a series of flatware-retaining elements, in the instant case, pockets, such as pockets 66, in which the flatware (butter spreaders 100) is retained. The upperV edge of the lapped pocket 66 is merrow-stitched or overlooked stitched to confer strength. In the embodiment shown in Figures l through 5, each of partitions 38, 40, 42, 44 and'46 are provided with six pockets, so that six-place settings can be retained in the atware case. v

Y It is of course to be understood, thata larger or smaller number of pockets canY be sewn on each of atware-retaining'partitions 38, 40, 42, 44, and 46 depending'upon the width of the fiatwarecase so that a smaller'or larger number of place-settings can be retained inthe case.

Each of partitions-40, 42, 44and 46 issimilarlyprovided with silver cloth, namely respective silver cloths 68, 70, 72 and 74 which are similarly positioned over the front faces of the partitions to form pockets and sewn at the edges in a similar manner as flatware-retaining partition 38. Thus in the case of flatware-retaining partition 40, silver cloth 68 is retained in position by means of end stitches 76 and 78, and a series of pockets 79 are formed therein by means of vertical stitching designated 80. Similarly, flatware-retaining partition 42 is provided with silver cloth 7G, which is retained in position by means of end stitches 82 and 84, andV a series of pockets designated 85 are formed therein by means of vertical stitching designated 86.

Flatware-retaining partition 44 is provided with silver cloth 72, which is retained in position by means of end stitches 88 and 90, and a series of pockets 91 are formed therein by means of vertical stitching designated 92. Flatware-retaining partition 46 is Vprovided with silver cloth 74, which is retained in position by means of end stitches 94 and 96, and a series of pockets designated 97 are formed therein by means ofvertical stitching designated 98.

The inner surface of rear wall 20 is covered with silver cloth 112. Silver cloth 112 is pasted to the inner surface of rear wall 20 and is provided with a series of pockets designated 113 which are formed thereon by means of vertical stitching designated 114. The largest of the atware, namely knives 110 are positioned in the pockets 113 in silver cloth 112. As shown in Figure 2 silver cloth 112 bears printed matter designating the type of atware to be inserted therein.

In the linstant embodiment, the flatware are retained solely on the front face of partitions 38, V40, 42, 44 and 46. However, if desired, additional atware-retaining pockets can be provided on the rear face of each partition. Y

An alternative modication of the silver atware case of my invention is shown in Figures 6 through 10 in which the silver flatware case 120 comprises abox or case 120 having a rectangular base 122, with rear wall 124, side walls '126 and 128, and front wall 130 extending upward therefrom. Side walls 126 and 128 kslope downf ward from the cover-ap hinge at the upper edge 132 (see Figure 7) of rear wall 124, and may be planar (as shown in the drawings) or-gusseted.

A cover or cover-flap 134, extends integrally from rear wall 124 from hinge edge 132 and overlaps a significant but minor portion of the outer upper surface of'front wall 130, the overlap 135 extends downward from creased front corner 137. As shown in Figure 9, cover 134 may be integral with rear wall 124. The cover 134 can be locked over front wall 130 bymeans of lock 136 which is adapted to operatively be engaged with an aligned socket in clasp member 138 located on overlap 135 of cover 134. The operative engagement of lock 136 in clasp '138 is shown in Figure 6. v Y

Positioned within the flatware case are liatware-retaining partitions 140, 142, 144, 146 and 148. The partitions are narrower than the internal width of the flatware case 120, and are attached or hinged to a platform 123 of form-retaining material by means of respective forward flanges or projections 150, 152, 154, 156, and 158, which project forwardly from each of the partitions for the entire width of the partition for a distance somewhatv lessV than the distance separating the partitions. Platform 123 may be pasted to base 122 or operatively engaged with but not connected with base Y122. In the latter embodiment platform 123 and atware-retaining partitions 140, 142, 144, 146 and 148 can be removed from case as a unit.

If desired, anges`150, 152, 154, 156 and V158 can be sewn to platform 123 or attached lthereto by other means, or alternatively, partitions 140, V142, 144, 146 and `148 may be pivotally'hinged directly to base 122 by clothY eX- tensions or the like.

As shown in Figures 8, 9 and 10 anges 150, 152, 154, 156 and 158 are integral with respective partitions 140, 142, 144, 146 and 148. However, if desired, partitions 140, 142, 144, 146 and 148 may be hinged to flanges 150, 152, 154, 156, and 158 by means of an overlapping flap or sleeve. The pivotal hinging of partitions 140, 142, 144, 146 and 148 at their base, coupled with their Width eing somewhat less than the internal width of the silver flatware case permits them to be pushed forward so that the silver atware retained within the case may be handled or examined when the case is opened.

Partitions 148, 142, 144, 146 and 148 comprise separators or walls 141, 143, 145, 147 and 149 of form-retaining flexible material, such as cardboard, paperboard or the like. As heretofore indicated, separators or walls 141, 143, 145, 147 and 149 are integral with respective flanges 150, 152, 154, 156 and 158, but due to their flexible nature are pivotal in respect thereto, so that when silver atware case 120 .is opened the partitions can, as heretofore mentioned, be pivoted forward to permit ready access to the flatware retained therein.

As shown in Figures 7, 8 and 9 partitions 148, 142, 144, 146 and 148 are graduated in size, the smallest partition 140 being adapted to receive the smallest of the flatware, namely butter spreader 160, and the largest of the partitions 148 being adapted to receive the next to the largest of the flatware namely forks 168. The remaining partitions 142, 144, and 146 are graduated in progressively increasing sizes, and retain flatware of progressively increasing size, namely teaspoons 162, salad forks 164, and cream soup spoons 166. Preferably, each of the partitions bear printed matter designating the atware to be inserted therein, as seen in Figure 7.

. Referring, particularly to Figures 8, 9 and 10, it is seen that each of the form-retaining wmls 141, 143, 145, 147 and 149 of respective partitions 140, 142, 144, 146 and 148 is covered with a relatively thin layer of material comprising atware-retaining fabric, preferably conventional tarnish-resisting cloth (known as silver cloth), which is pocketed into flatware-retaining elements on the front face of each partition.

1n the illustrated embodiment of the invention the silver cloth covers the front face of the retaining wall of each partition and extends downwardly over a major portion of the rear face thereof. While this constitutes a preferred embodiment, if desired, the silver cloth can cover and be pocketed on solely :the front face of any or each partition or cover and be pocketed on the front face and cover a minor portion of the rear face of any or each partition or cover a minor portion of the front face and cover and be pocketed on the rear face of any or each partition or cover and be pocketed on both the front and rear faces of any or each partition.

As seen in Figure 9, in the instant embodiment the silver cloth 172 for partition 148 is somewhat wider than the form-retaining separator 141 for a major portion of its height, being slipped over form-retaining separator 141 with only the bottom portion of silver cloth 172 being co-extensive with the width of form-retaining separator 141. The peripheral edge of silver cloth 172 is stitched by means of merrow stitching or over-lock stitching to confer strength. If desired, silver cloth 172 can be glued to form-retaining wall 141, although this is usually not necessary since if silver cloth 172 is stretched over form-retaining wall 141 it will adhere thereto. The front face of silver cloth 172 is provided with a series of silver cloth pockets designated 175 formed by means of vertical stitching designated 177 on the overlapped silver cloth 172. The upper edge of these pockets is merrow stitched to provide greater strength.

Each of partitions 142, 144, 146 and 148 is similarly provided with silver cloth, namely, respective silver cloths 174, 176, 178 and 180.

Thus, in the case of flatware-retaining partition 142, silver cloth 174 is fitted over form-retaining separator 6 143, with only the bottom portion of silver cloth 174 being co-extensive with the width of partition 142 and engaged with the front face of form-retaining separator 143. The peripheral edge of silver cloth 174, is merrowstitched or over-locked stitched to confer strength. The front face of silver cloth 174 is provided with a series of pockets designated 182 formed by the vertical stitching designated 184 partitioning the overlapped silver clothv 174. The upper edge of these pockets is merrow-stitched to provide greater strength. Y

Silver cloths 176, 178 and 180 are engaged with respective retaining walls 145, 147 and 149 in an analogous manner to that heretofore described for silver cloths 172 and 174. Pockets designated 186 of overlapped silver cloth 176 are formed on the front face of form-retaining wall by means of vertical stitching 188. Pockets designated 190 of overlapped silver cloth 178 are formed on the front face of form-retaining wall 147 by means of vertical stitching 192. Pockets designated 194 of overlapped silver cloth are formed on the front face of form-retaining wall 149 by means of vertical stitching 196.

The inner surface of flatware case 128 is covered with silver cloth 198 which covers the entire inner surface of front wall 130, base 122, side walls 126 and 128, rear wall 124 and cover 134.

The silver cloth 198 on the rear wall 124 is covered with a series of silver cloth atware-retaining elements designated 260, formed by stitching an external section of silver cloth to silver cloth 198 by vertical stitches designated 282. The upper edge of flatware-retaining element 296 is merrow-stitched to provide greater strength. As seen in Figure 9, flatware-retaining elements 28) are open at the base, unlike pockets 175, 182, 186, and 194 which are formed from lapped silver cloth. The largest atware, namely, knives 170 are retained in atware-retaining elements 288, and silver cloth 19S on rear wall 124 bears the printed matter Knives As seen in Figure l0, each flatware-retaining partition is provided with six pockets there also being space for six knives in flatware-retaining elements 200 on rear wall 124. Accordingly, siX place-settings can be retained in the flatware case. However, if desired, a larger number or smaller number of pockets and correspondingly place settings can be provided.

An inner protective cover 206 comprising silver cloth extends downwardly from the silver cloth 198 on cover 134 in the region of hinge 132 and covers the upper edge of flatware-retaining partitions 140, 142, 144, 146 and 148 in the manner shown in Figure 9. The peripheral edge of inner cover 206 is merrow-stitched as shown in Figure 7. In place of single inner protective cover 206, separate silver cloth covers can be provided for each partition, extending downwardly from the top thereof.

The present invention permits a plurality of placesettings to be stored and encased in an attractive fashion with convenient and ready access to the atware. Moreover, scratching and abrasion of the flatware is prevented notwithstanding the transporting or moving of the case since metal-to-metal contact is avoided. In addition, the llatware contents, in particular, silver atware, in the preferred embodiment employing silver cloth are maintained in tarnish-free condition, rendering their polishing to remove discoloration due to atmospheric oxidation unnecessary or infrequent.

rlhe present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof, and it is therefore desired that the present embodiments be considered in all respects as illustrative, reference being had to the appended claims rather than to the foregoing description to indicate the scope of the invention.

Having described my invention, I claim:

l. A multi-compartmented atware case comprising a generally rectangular base, a rear wall extending upward avesse?" from saidrgenerally rectangular base, a front wall extending upward from said base, side walls extending upward rom said generally rectangular base intermediate said front and rear walls, a Aplurality or flatware-retaining partitions comprising separators of form-retaining material positioned within said case intermediate said front and rear walls and positioned, when said case is closed, in generally parallel -planes in respect to said front and rear'walls, the Width of said atware-retaining partitions being somewhat less than the internal width of said case thereby providing clearance with said side walls, said separators being of gradually increasing height from front to rear, a fabric covering-on at least one face of each separator, said fabric covering forming relatively flexible fabric atware-retaining elements on each separator, a pivotal hinge extending from the bottom portion of each of said separators and operatively secured to the base, pivotally hinging each of said separators in respect to said generally rectangular base, and a case-closing cover extending from said rear wall over the tops of said flatware-retaining partitions closely adjacent the upper portien of the front wall of said case.

2. A multi-compartmented flatware case comprising a generally rectangular base of form-retaining material, a relatively wide rear wall of form-retaining material extending generaily perpendicularly upward from said generally Vrectangular base, a relatively wide front wall extending upward from said base, said front wall being substantially lower than said rear wall, relatively narrow side walls extending upward from said generally reetangular .base intermediate said relatively wide front and rear Walls, a plurality of flatware-retaining partitions comprising separators of form-retaining material posi- K tioned within said case intermediate said front and-rear walls and positioned when said case is closed with their width dimension in generally parallel planes in respect to said front and rear walls, said width dimension being somewhat less than the internal width of said case thereby providing clearance with said side walls, said separators 'being of .gradually increasing height from front to rear,

a fabric covering 'on the forward face and on at least a major'portion of the rear face of each separator, said fabric covering forming relatively tiexible fabric atwareretaining elements comprising overlapped fabric pockets on the forward face of each separator, the top of each of said pockets terminating below the top of its separator, a fabric covering on the inner face of said rear wall form- ,o z:- irig flatware-retaining elements thereon, a pivotalhinge comprising a flange extending Afromlthe bottom portion of each of said separators and .joined to said base pivotally hinging each of saidA separatorsV in respect to said gen-Y erally rectangular base, and a case-closing cover extending from said rear Ywall over the topsof said vflatwareretaining partitions closely adjacent' the upper portion of the front wall of said case. Y p

3. A multi-compartmented atware case comprising a generally rectangular base of form-retaining material, a relatively wide rear wall of form-retaining material extending generally perpendicularly upward from said generally rectangular base, a relatively wide rigidly-positioned front wall of form-retainingmater-ial extending generally perpendicularly upward from said base, saidfront wall being substantially lowerY than said rear wall, relatively narrow sidewalls extending upward from said generally rectangular base and joining Vsaid relatively Wide front and rear walls, a plurality of flatware-retaining partitions comprising separators of form-retaining material positioned within said case intermediate said front and rear walls and .positioned when said case is closed with their Width dimension in generally parallel planes in respect to saidV front and rear walls, said width dimension being some- Y what less than the internal Width of Said case thereby providing clearance with said side walls, said separators being of gradually increasing height from front to rear, a fabric covering on each separator, said fabric covering forming relatively exible Vfabric flatware-retaining elements on each separator, a Ypivotal hinge extending from the bottom portion of each of said separators pivotally hinging each of said separators in respect to Vsaid generally rectangular base, and a case-closing cover eX- tending from said rear wall over the tops of said flatware-retaining partitionsV and vclosely adjacent the upper portion of the front wall of said case.

References Cited in the le of this patent 1 UNlTED STATES PATENTS Pentland et al. Ian. 3,

alam. tqu

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2922451 *Oct 13, 1958Jan 26, 1960Morris White Fashions IncHandbags
US3986756 *Feb 21, 1975Oct 19, 1976Kranich Joel HStorage bin and display assembly for rolls of decorative paper and the like
US4416372 *Sep 29, 1982Nov 22, 1983Polk Gary LDrywaller's tool box
US4883171 *Oct 21, 1988Nov 28, 1989Wayne CarltonAnimal call device holder and assembly
US5244025 *Aug 22, 1991Sep 14, 1993Wewers Molly FProtective jackets for chinaware
US6234385Sep 3, 1999May 22, 2001R.R. Foreman And CompanySide loading storage box
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US7520390 *Mar 24, 2005Apr 21, 2009The Kroger Co.Configurable display container
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US8684183 *Dec 13, 2006Apr 1, 2014Vaughn D. TrannonCarrying case for culinary essentials
US20050205506 *Apr 27, 2004Sep 22, 2005Lifetime Hoan CorporationTool holder with markings
WO1986003659A1 *Dec 18, 1985Jul 3, 1986Verducci Gianni SrlContainer, in particular pocket-container for cosmetic products
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/553, 206/373, 206/766, 229/122
International ClassificationA47G21/14, A47G21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G21/14
European ClassificationA47G21/14