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Publication numberUS2789828 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1957
Filing dateJan 26, 1954
Priority dateJan 26, 1954
Publication numberUS 2789828 A, US 2789828A, US-A-2789828, US2789828 A, US2789828A
InventorsJames Gary
Original AssigneeJames Gary
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rack for facilitating opening of a wardrobe trunk
US 2789828 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[A ril 23, 1957 J. GARY RACK FOR FACILITATING OPENING OF A WARDROBE TRUNK Filed Jan. 26, 1954 4 UN 6 E o 5 WW 2 J 5 8 W w/ z m 7 .m W Va F w n a 5a F lg. 3

6 0 0 4 5 2 lm. Mu 4 w 6 "2 AHWO United States Patent O F RACK FOR FACILITATING OPENING A WARDROBE TRUNK This invention relates to the class of supports and more particularly to a novel rack for use in combination with a wardrobe trunk whereby the sections of the wardrobe trunk may be more easily opened and closed thereby allowing more ready access to the contents thereof.

This invention features a rack which is adapted to be positioned beneath the various sections of a wardrobe trunk in a manner so that the rack is continuously resiliently held on the trunk. Utilized in the present invention and forming important elements thereof are coil springs which are terminally secured to transverse bars forming parts of the wardrobe trunk rack. Means are also provided for enabling the wardrobe trunk rack to be used with various sizes of wardrobe trunks.

Still further objects and features of the invention reside in the provision of a wardrobe trunk rack that is strong and durable, simple in construction and manufacture, capable of being readily attached to various shapes, sizes and models of trunks and the like, yet which is easily attached and detached from the trunk when not in use.

These, together with various ancillary objects and features of the invention which will become apparent as the following description proceeds, are obtained by this wardrobe trunk rack, the preferred embodiment of which has been illustrated in the accompanying drawings, by way of example only, wherein:

Figure 1 is a perspective view illustrating the manner in which the wardrobe trunk rack is secured to a wardrobe trunk;

Figure 2 is an enlarged vertical sectional view as taken along the plane of line 22 in Figure l; and

Figure 3 is a plan view illustrating the manner in which the wardrobe trunk rack is arranged when the trunk is in a closed position.

With continuing reference to the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals designate similar parts throughout the various views, reference numerals 10 and 12 are used to designate the halves of a conventional wardrobe trunk rack which are hingedly secured to each other so as to permit access to the interior thereof when opened. It is comparatively dilficult to open and close a wardrobe trunk because of the substantial weight thereof and the Wardrobe trunk rack according to the present invention provides means whereby the weight of the trunk is supported on rollers enabling the ready manipulation of the halves of the wardrobe trunk. The Wardrobe trunk rack includes a pair of longitudinal support members 16 and 18 each of which is formed from telescoping adjustable sections as at 20, 22, and 24, 26. The sections 20 and 26 are provided with elongated slots 28 and 30 therein through which fasteners 32 and 34 extend, which fasteners provide means for holding the sections of the support members 16 and 18 in an adjusted relationship. Additionally, as can be seen in Figure 2, the sections 20 and 26 have brackets as at 36 attached thereto while other brackets as at 38 are attached to and depend from the sections 22 and 24. The

2,789,828 Patented Apr. 23, 1957 ice brackets 36 and 38 are of angle shape and have downwardly depending flanges having aligned apertures therein through which headed threaded members 40 extend. Wing nuts as at 42 are threadedly engaged on the rod 40 and are provided for lockingly holding the various sections of the support members 16 and 18 in an adjusted relationship With the flanges 44, 46 and 48, 50 attached to the sections 20, 22, 24 and 26 respectively engaging the vertically extending portions of the halves 10 and 12 of the wardrobe trunk. Secured to and depending from the various sections 20, 22, 24 and 26 are casters such as are indicated at 52.

Secured to the sections 20, 22, 24 and 26 are transverse bars 54, 56, 58 and 60 which have upwardly extending flanges 62, 64, 66 and 68. These flanges are likewise .adapted to engage the vertically extending portions of the halves of the trunk 10 and 12 and are held in engagement therewith by a coil spring 70 terminally secured to the bars 56 and 58. The coil spring 70 continuously draws the rack against the side walls of the trunk and is continuously maintained under some tension. Of course when the wardrobe trunk is opened from the position as in Figure 3 to the position as shown in Figure 1 the spring 70 will be tensioned. However, while the spring 70 is strong enough to continuously hold the rack in engagement with the halves 10 and 12 of the Wardrobe trunk it is not strong enough to cause the sections of the trunk to be closed by overcoming the inertia of the sections and the frictional resistance applied at the casters 52.

When the wardrobe trunk is in a closed position resilient interen-gaging coil spring fasteners 72 and 74 will be interengaged by having the loops 76 and 78 attached to each intermeshed as can be best seen in Figure 3. Then, both the coil springs 70 and the resilient fasteners 72 and 74 will be under tension to hold the rack on the trunk. However, by the simple means of expanding the springs 70, 72 and 74 the rack may be readily removed. It is to be noted that the rack may be used for transporting the wardrobe trunk by merely pushing it along the surface of the flooring gaining the mechanical advantage afforded by the casters 52.

Since from the foregoing the construction and advantages of this wardrobe trunk rack are readily apparent, further description is believed to be unnecessary.

However, since numerous modifications will readily occur to those skilled in the art after a consideration of the foregoing specification and accompanying drawings, it is not intended to limit the invention to the precise embodiment shown and described, but all suitable modifications and equivalents may readily be resorted to.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A wardrobe trunk rack comprising a pair of longitudinal support members adapted to be positioned beneath a wardrobe trunk, a pair of transverse bars secured to each of said support members normal thereto, resilient means resiliently securing one of each of said pair of transverse bars to the other thereof, and resilient fasteners detachably securing each of the other of said pair of transverse bars to each other, said support members having casters secured thereto.

2. A wardrobe trunk rack comprising a pair of longitudinal support members adapted to be positioned beneath a wardrobe trunk, a pair of transverse bars secured to each of said support members normal thereto, resilient means resiliently securing one of each of said pair of transverse bars to the other thereof, and resilient fasteners detachably securing each of the other of said pair of transverse bars to each other, said support members having casters secured thereto, each of said support members comprising a pair of telescoping adjustable sections, one of each of said sections having an elongated slot therein, and fasteners extending through said slots securing said sections to each other and means for adjusting the relationship of said sections attached thereto.

3. A Wardrobe trunk rack comprising a pair of longitudinal support members adapted to be positioned beneath the bottonrwalls of a wardrobe trunk, a pair of transverse bars secured to each of said support members normal thereto, resilient means resiliently securing one of each of said pair of transverse bars to the other thereof, and resilient fasteners detachably securing each of the other of said pair of transverse bars to each other, said support members having casters secured thereto, each of said sections and said bars having an upwardly extending flange for engaging the vertically extending portions of a trunk.

4. A wardrobe trunk rack comprising a pair of longitudinal support members adapted to be positioned beneath the bottom Walls of a wardrobe trunk, a pair of transverse bars secured to each of said support members normal thereto, resilient means resiliently securing one of each of said pair of transverse bars to the other thereof, and resilient fasteners detachably securing each of the other said pair of transverse bars to each other, said support members having casters secured thereto, each of said sections and said bars having an upwardly extending flange for engaging the vertically extending portions of a trunk, each of said support member comprising a pair of telescoping adjustable sections, one of each of said sections having an elongated slot therein, and fasteners extending through said slots securing said sections to each other, and means foradjusting the relationship of said sections attached thereto.

References" Citedin the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 175,259 Selman etral. Mar. 28, 1876 234,336 Schenck Nov. 9, 1880 234,836 Rorke Nov. 23, 1880 1,350,963 Fowler Aug. 24, 1920 1,352,234 Whitten Sept. 7, 1920 1,549,879 Jeidel Aug. 18, 1925 1,926,134 Beard Sept. 12, 1933 2,174,661 Hope et a1 Oct. 3, 1939 2,480,025 Hunter a Aug. 23, 1949 2,534,367 Perotta et a1. Dec. 19, 1950 2,654,421 vVetf Oct. 6, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US175259 *Nov 29, 1875Mar 28, 1876 Improvement in sewing-machine casters
US234336 *Nov 9, 1880 Stove-truck
US234836 *Oct 14, 1880Nov 23, 1880 rorke
US1350963 *May 23, 1919Aug 24, 1920Fowler Henry CFolding display-truck
US1352234 *Oct 28, 1919Sep 7, 1920Edwin GuthrieWardrobe-trunk opener and carrier
US1549879 *Nov 1, 1924Aug 18, 1925Julius JeidelTrunk dolly
US1926134 *Oct 7, 1929Sep 12, 1933Beard John MSupport or holder for wardrobe trunks
US2174661 *Jan 22, 1938Oct 3, 1939Griffith Hope CompanyCastered harness
US2480025 *Nov 29, 1946Aug 23, 1949Hunter Felix LBed carriage
US2534367 *Apr 14, 1949Dec 19, 1950Parkrose Gloria MLoad carrier
US2654421 *Jun 9, 1949Oct 6, 1953Neff Roy GWheeled base for chairs
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2919138 *Mar 7, 1958Dec 29, 1959Bailey BrowerDolly attachments for suit cases or like articles of manufacture
US2964329 *Aug 7, 1958Dec 13, 1960Olga BeckSelf tensioning detachable luggage caster rollers
US3120719 *Jul 17, 1961Feb 11, 1964Simonds June MToy making wheel assemblies
US3533640 *Apr 19, 1968Oct 13, 1970Fator George DDolly construction
US4118048 *Apr 8, 1977Oct 3, 1978Seiko Time CorporationWheeled sample case
US4171828 *Dec 16, 1977Oct 23, 1979Allied Chemical CorporationTextile tube dolly
US4471971 *Apr 7, 1982Sep 18, 1984Keesler Patrick EDisplay island moving means
US4545592 *Nov 2, 1983Oct 8, 1985Boris TaskovicAdjustable width luggage carrier apparatus
US7213820 *May 17, 2004May 8, 2007David Carl DrummondMobile load support
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/35
International ClassificationA45C13/38, A45C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45C13/38
European ClassificationA45C13/38