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Publication numberUS2790486 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 30, 1957
Filing dateNov 18, 1953
Priority dateNov 24, 1952
Publication numberUS 2790486 A, US 2790486A, US-A-2790486, US2790486 A, US2790486A
InventorsEric Hardie Donald
Original AssigneeEric Hardie Donald
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Babies' high chairs
US 2790486 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 30, 1957 D. E. HARDIE 2,790,486

BABIES HIGH CHAIRS I Filed Nov. 18, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet l Inventor DONALD ERIC HARDIE Ev -W 4.

- Attorney April 30, 1957- D. E. HARDlE 2,790,486

BABIES, HIGH CHAIRS Filed Nov. 18, 1953 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Inventor DQNALD ERIC HARDIE Ativrm'y April 30, 1957 D. E. HARDIE 2,790,486

BABIES HIGH CHAIRS Filed Nov. 18, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Inventor DONALD ERIC HARDIE Attorney United States Patent M BABIES HIGH CHAIRS Donald Eric Hardie, Keighley, England Application November 18, 1953, Serial No. 392,925

Claims priority, application Great Britain November 24, 1952 19 Claims. (Cl. 155-124) This invention relates to chairs comprising a rigid folding frame and a canvas or like seat. It is concerned particularly with what may be called the frame geometry; and it has a particular usefulness in its application to babies high chairs.

A main object of the present invention is to provide a babys high chair that can be folded up when not in use and to provide a babys high chair which is substantially safe against overturning as a result of the squirming and such like movements of the child. Another main object of the invention is to provide a folding chair of the canvas seat type of enhanced rigidity and stability.

A chair frame constructed according to the present invention comprises a pair of main braces connected together at the top and spread apart to form an inverted V-shaped frame, the upper parts of said main braces forming the back of the chair and their lower parts forming the respective front legs, a pair of rear leg braces spread apart at substantially the same angle as the main braces and pivoted to the respective main braces so that their lower parts form the respective rear legs, a chair seat supported on the upper parts of the rear leg braces, said chair seat being of flexible material, such as canvas and the like, and including a back forming portion for securing to the V-shaped frame, a seat portion and a pilch portion which is turned up and secured by a belt to the main braces when a child is supported on the seat, and a cross strut extending between the members of a pair of braces so as to hold them spread apart.

The bars of the pair of main braces may be hinged together at the top and the cross strut may be displaceable, so that the chair can be collapsed to the extent of bringing the members of the pairs of braces together, and each rear leg brace may be releasably secured to its respective main brace as by a wing nut, so that the chair can be collapsed to the extent of bringing each rear leg brace into line with its main brace.

A chair frame constructed according to the present invention may have means for attaching to the frame a canvas or like seat in such manner that the weight of an occupant upon the seat tends to increase the rigidity of the structure and the front corners of a canvas or like seat may be constructed to be attachable to the upper parts of the rear leg braces. The side bars extend between the parts of the main braces and the upper parts of the rear leg braces may be adapted to receive the sides of a canvas or like seat.

The side bars extending between the upper parts of the main braces and the upper parts of the rear leg braces of a chair constructed according to the invention hold the chair against collapse by spreading the legs in a fore and aft direction. A chair frame constructed according to the invention may comprise struts secured at the lower ends to the respective main braces and extending upwardly and forwardly, and side members pinned tothe upper parts both of the struts and of. the rear leg braces so that they lie substantially horizontally, said. side members serving also to hold the chair against collapse by 2,790,486 Patented Apr. 30, 1957 spreading of the legs in the fore and aft direction. The side members may be adapted to carry a canvas or like table lying substantially horizontally.

The canvas seat employed with the chair frame constructed according to the invention is preferably a unitary canvas seat including a back cover and the unitary seat and back main brace, a pilch and a body belt.

In an alternative construction, the members of each pair of braces are rigidly connected and the cross strut is located adjacent the pivot axis of the leg and main braces to limit the pivotal movement of the braces during erection.

In order that the invention may be more clearly understood four preferred embodiments thereof willnow be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

n Fig. 1 is a front view of the'first embodiment;

Fig. 2 is a side view thereof;

Fig. 3 is a side view of the second embodiment;

Fig. 4 is a side View of the third embodiment;

Fig. 5 is a front view of the tray for the third embodiment;

Fig. 6 is a front view of part of the third embodiment;

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of a fourth embodiment;

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary perspective view from below showing the attachment of the tray to the frame of the fourth embodiment; I

Fig. 9 is a sectional view on the lines IX-IX of Fig. 8; and

Fig. 10 is a broken front view of a tray similar to that shown in Figures 7 to 9 but having an alternative mean-s of attachment.

In the drawings, like references designate similar parts, of the various embodiments of the invention hereinafter described with reference to such drawings.

The babys folding chair shown in Fig. l. and 2 consists of a geometrically rigid frame and a canvas support swung between different parts of the frame. The frame consists of a pair of main braces 1 and 2, a pair of rear leg braces 3 and 4, a pair of side bars 5 and 6, and a cross strut 7. The pair of main braces 1 and 2 are hinged together at the top by means of a hinge 8 and (assuming of course that the chair is in its open or erect position) are spread apart in the form of an inverted V, so that their two upper parts constitute the chair back and the lower parts constitute the two front legs. The two rear leg braces 3 and 4, again assuming chair erection, are pivoted to the respective main braces 1 and 2 at a position 9 somewhat below the seat and at an angle to the main braces, thujs constituting the rear legs and the supports for the seat front. The side bars 5 andfl6 are pivoted to the main bracfes 1 and 2 at a position 10 above the rear leg fixture 9 and extend forwardly to rest in slots or recesses in the top extremities of the rear leg braces .3 and 4, so that they are prevented from move ment in the inward direction. (It may be convenient to prevent their movement in the outward sense also, although this is not necessary as a matter of the chair geometry.) Finally there is the cross strut 7 which, when the main braces 1 and 2 have been spread apart, taking the' rear leg bars with them, fits' b'etween the members of the pairs at the crux to hold Ihfil spread apart or alternatively across 3 and 4 only.

As an alternative the member 7 may be made to fit at both ends into twoinner holes or recesses either in the back legs or even in the front legs of the chair, such holes or recesses extending only partly through the'thic'kness of the legs. Further, the member 7 need not be placed so high as'sh own in the drawing; but if desired can be situated-at aconsiderably lower level.

but it consists of three parts" namely theback, the seat,

and the pilch and body belt. The back part is in the form of a conical sleeve 11 which is adapted to fit over the top part of the inverted V formed. by the main braces 1 and 2 when they are spread apart. The seat is in the form of a belt 12 which can be fitted over the side bars 5 and 6 and which has its rear edge sewn to the bottom front edge of the back part 11 as indicated at 13. The pilch and body belt part is in the form of a triangular pilch 14 sewn to the front edge of the seat part 12 and has the loop or belt 15 attached or integral with its free extremity. In Fig. 1 the pilch and body belt part is shown hanging down, but in Fig. 2 it is also shown in the wearing position with the belt hitched over the back of the chair.

The seating of the baby in the chair is obvious; but what has to be stressed are the two facts, firstly that the action of the occupants weight is always in the direction of tightening and rigidifying the structure, and secondly that infant occupant can never, no matter how or into what position it may squirm itself, cause the chair to over-turn. Thus the weight of the occupant pulls downwardly upon the canvas at the point 13 so as to tend to tighten'the conical back part 11 upon the back frame; again the weight on the seat canvas 12 tends to pull the side bars 5 and 6 inwardly towards one another and to bring with them the other frame parts also, but this tendency only serves to tighten the cross strut 7 in its place, this cross strut being the key to the rigidity of the frame geometry. As for the question of safety, one way of expressing this is to say that the child can never get a purchase whereby he can put himself into an over-tilting position, or again that his centre of gravity can never be displaced beyond the base as defined by-the four widely spread feet.

The chair as described and shown has two degrees of collapsibility. In the first place it can be folded out of the way by knocking out the cross strut 7 (which is attached to the other members of the frame by a chain so that it shall not be mislaid) and dropping the two members of the pairs together so that the chair can, for instance, be rested against a wall. In the second place the connection, which is preferably a wing nut and bolt, at the point 9 may be loosened so that the main bars and rear legs may be brought round into or nearly into line. The whole will then occupy a space not much more than the thickness of the bars and the length of the main braces, and can be packed into a bag for transport; but remaining readily available should it be needed, as for instance in a public restaurant.

The canvas seat and back is readily removable from the seat frame for washing the canvas.

In place of the side bars 5 and 6 there may be a rectangular U-shaped wire inserted within the seat canvas 12, extending across the front and backwardly along the two sides; the extremities of the wire may be turned inwardly and engage behind the main braces 1 and 2 at about the position 10, without being attached to the braces; or the extremities may be hoisted within holes in the braces.

The babys folding chair which has been shown in Fig. 3 differs from that shown in Figs. 1 and 2 by the elimination of the side bars 5, 6 and the incorporation of a table; otherwise the two chairs are generally similar, and the same reference numerals have been used for similar elements in both cases, so that further description of those elements is thought unnecessary.

At the point 9 where the main braces 1 and 2 are crossed by and are secured to the rear leg braces 3 and 4, there are also secured the lower ends of struts 16, one on each side, which extend forwardly and upwardly so that their upper ends lie on a level with, but somewhat forwardly of, the upper ends of the rear leg braces'3 and 4. A table 17 is pinned to the upper ends of both of the struts 16 and of the rear leg braces 3 and 4, so that it lies substantially horizontally. This table 17 thus serves not only as such, but it performs the further function,

" the childs knees.

frame against collapse by spreading of the legs in the fore and aft direction.

Of course, in order to preserve the feature of foldability, the pinning of the upper ends of members 3 and 4 and/or 16 to the table 17 must be in some way releasable; and this is best provided for by having either the pins on members 16, or, as shown, the pins on members 3 and 4, riding within slots 18, so that by loosening the wing nuts at point 9 one can collapse the chair along the lines 19. Again, with a view to preserving what has been referred to above as the first degree of collapsibility, the table 17 consists of a canvas top stretched between two side members. For feeding and like purposes a tray, as of plastic material or wood or metal, may be fitted in place.

The canvas seat 20, not having the side bars 5 and 6 to hold it as does the seat 12 in Figs. '1 and 2, is attached to a cross bar 21 extending across between the upper parts of members 3 and 4. Like the cross strut 7, this seatholding cross bar 21 must be displaceable to allow of the first stage of collapse, and it is preferably covered with soft rubber or like material to ease the pressure under Alternatively the front edge of the seat 20 may be reinforced with stout wire or the like having hooks at its two ends. These hooks will then engage in eyes on the members 3 and 4 located at about the same position as the sockets for the cross bar 21 in Fig. 3. An advantage of this latter arrangement is that it preserves the feature of Figs. 1 and 2 that the weight of the child on the seat tends to tighten and rigidify the structure, especially with regard to the cross strut 7.

The pilch and body belt, which have been clearly shown in Figs. 1 and 2, have been omitted from Fig. 3 for the sake of clarity.

In the modification according to Figs. 4, 5 and 6 there are provided at the upper ends of the members 3, 4 rigid therewith and extending horizontally in the erected condition of the chair, rests 22 having an undercut inner edge 23. The tray 27 employed in this embodiment has an underneath spacing member 24, the outer ends of which are likewise undercut as at 25, corresponding to the edges 23. Since, when the chair is occupied, the rests 22 will be drawn together under the weight of the occupant, it is not necessary in this case for the table to be secured to the chair even at one end, as it will be firmly held in position by the interengagement of the undercut edges. If desired, of course, hinges may be provided along one undercut edge hinging it to the chair. A plastic sheet 26 may be suspended loosely between the legs of the chair at a suitable distance below the seat.

The fourth embodiment of babys folding chair, illustrated in Figures 7 to 9, is constructed in tubular metal, e. g. steel or aluminium. The members 1 and 2 of the pair of main braces are rigidly connected at their upper ends by a semicircular portion 28 and the members 3 and 4 of the pair of rear leg braces are rigidly connected 'at their upper ends by a straight horizontal portion 29. The cross strut 7 is secured, as by Welding, to the rear leg braces 3 and 4 adjacent the pivot axis 9 and limits the pivotal movement of the braces during erection by engagement with the main braces 1 and 2.

The lower parts of the main braces and rear leg 'braces are spread apart by additional cross struts 30 and 31 secured, as by welding, to each pair of braces towards the lower ends thereof.

The lower ends of the braces may be provided with rubber caps 32 to prevent marking of the surface in which the chair is erected.

The upper parts of the main braces '1 and 2 are bent at 33 so :as to form an approximately vertical back for the chair in the erected position. The upper parts of the rear leg braces 3 and 4 are bent at 34 so as to lie in a substantially horizontal plane with the portion'29 horizontal inth'e erected position of the chair. The

horizontal portions of the upper parts of the rear legi braces and the horizontal portion 29 form a support for a tray 35.

The tray 35 is mounted so that it may be swung away from a horizontal position to a position beneath the horizontal portion 29 and the horizontal portions of the upper parts of the rear leg braces. For this purpose, a sleeve 36 is revolubly mounted on the horizontal portion 29 "and carries 'an offset spigot 37 lying at right angles to the axis of the sleeve 36. The spigot 37 is revolubly mounted in a holder 38 on the lower side of the tray 35. A spring clip 39 is also mounted on the lower side of the tray for engagement on the horizontal portion of the upper part of one of the rear leg braces. Two such clips may be provided if desired. Instead of forming member 36 as a sleeve it may be a solid bar, with a transverse opening therethrough, which is placed within tube 29.

A canvas support, similar to that provided for the second embodiment shown in Figure 3, is provided to constitute a seat for a baby. The support includes a back part in the form of a conical sleeve 11 which fits over the inverted V formed by the upper parts of the main braces 1 and 2, a seat part 20 having eyes in the front corners for engagement on hooks 40 on the upper parts of the rear leg braces 3 and 4, a triangular pilch 14 sewn to the front edge of the seat part and a body belt 15.

In one practical form of construction, the height of the main braces is 45 inches and these are spread apart 21 inches at their lower ends. In the erected position the pivot axis 9 is 18 inches from the ground and the lower ends of the main and rear leg braces are 26 inches apart.

In use the chair frame can be lifted in one hand by grasping the semicircular portion 28. To erect the chair, the lower ends of the rear leg braces 3 and 4 are then placed on the ground and a downward and backward pressure applied to the top of the main braces 1 and 2. When the cross strut 7 engages these latter, the chair is lowered to allow the lower ends of the main braces to engage the ground.

To collapse the chair, the tray is first released from its engagement with the horizontal portion of the upper part of the rear leg brace by the spring clip 39, by swinging the tray about the axis of the sleeve 36. The tray is then swung about the spigot 37 and released to a position beneath the horizontal portion 29. The chair is then lifted, whereby the rear leg braces and main braces pivot towards each other so that the chair may be stowed away in a minimum space.

Figure illustrates an alternative method of securing the tray 35 to the chair frame.

In this case, the horizontal portion 29 is split into two halves and the sleeve 36 is revolubly mounted thereon to cover the split. A bolt 41 projects from the lower side of the tray at right angles thereto and passes through apertures provided in the sleeve 36 so as to be revoluble therein. By means of a wing nut 42, engaged on the end of the bolt 41, the tray maybe secured to the sleeve and horizontal portion 29.

-It will be understood that the chair frame may be c011- structed in wood, metal or any other suitable material.

I claim:

1. A folding chair comprising a pair of main braces connected together at the top and spread apart to form an inverted V-shaped frame, the upper parts of said main braces forming the back of the chair and their lower parts forming the respective front legs, a pair of rear leg braces spread apart at substantially the same angle as the main braces and pivoted to the respective main braces so that their lower parts form the respective rear legs, a chair seat supported at the front on the upper parts of said rear leg braces, said chair seat being of flexible material and including a back forming portion for securing to said V-shaped frame, a seat portion,*a pilch portionwhich is turned up and a belt member for securing said pilch portion to said main braces when a child is supported. on the seat, and a cross strut extending between the members of a pair of braces so as to hold them spread apart.

2. A folding chair comprising a pair of main braces connected together at the top and spread apart to form an inverted V-shaped frame, the upper parts of said main braces forming the back of the chair and their lower parts forming the respective front legs, a pair of rear leg braces spread apart at substantially the same angle as the main braces and pivoted to the respective main braces so that their lower parts form the respective rear legs, a chair seat supported at the front on the upper parts of said rear leg braces, said chair seat being of flexible material and including a back forming portion for securing to said V-shaped frame, a seat portion, a pilch portion which is turned up and a belt member for securing said pilch portion to said main braces when a child is supported on the. seat, and a cross strut extending between the members of a pair of braces so as to hold them spread apart, said members of the pair of main braces being hinged together at the top and said cross strut being displaceable, so that the chair can be collapsed to the extent of bringing the members of the pairs of braces together.

3. A chair according to claim 2, wherein each rear leg brace is releasably fixed to its respective main brace, so that the chair can be collapsed to the extent of bringing the rear leg brace into line with its main brace.

4. A chair according to claim 2 and having means for attaching to, the frame a seat of flexible material insuch manner that the weight of an occupant upon the seat tends to increase the rigidity of the structure.

5. A chair according to claim 2, including a detachable seat of flexible material, said seat having front corners for attachment to the upper parts of the rear leg braces and a rear portion formed to fit over and be retained' on the upper parts of the pair of main braces.

6. A chair according to claim 2 including side bars extending between the upper parts of the main. braces and the upper parts of the rear leg braces to hold the chair against collapse by spreading of the legs in the fore and aft direction.

7. A chair according to claim 2, including side bars extending between the upper parts of the main braces and the upper parts of the rear legbraces and formed to receive the sides of a canvas or like seat.

8. A chair according to claim 2, including struts secured at their lower ends to the respective main braces and extending upwardly and forwardly, and side members pinned to the upper ends both of the struts and of the rear leg braces so that they lie substantially horizontally, said side members serving also to hold the chair against collapse by spreading of the legs in the fore and aft direction.

9. A chair according to claim 2, including struts secured at their lower ends to the respective main braces and extending upwardly and forwardly, and side members pinned to the upper ends both of the struts and of the rear leg braces so that they lie substantially horizontally, said side members serving also to hold the chair against collapse by spreading of the legs in the fore and aft direction, and being formed to carry a table lying substantially horizontally.

10. A folding chair comprising a pair of main braces connected together at the top and spread apart to form an inverted V-shaped frame, the upper parts of said main braces forming the back of the chair and their lower parts forming the respective front legs, a pair of rear leg braces spread apart at substantially the same angle as the main braces and pivoted to the respective main braces so that their lower parts form the respective rear legs, a chair seat supported at the front on the upper parts of said rear leg braces, said chair seat being of flexible material and including a back forming portion for securing to said V-shaped frame, a seat portion, a pilch portion which is turned up and a belt member for securing said pilch portion to said main braces when a child is supported on the seat, and a cross strut extending between the members of a pair of braces so as to hold them spread apart, said members of each pair of braces being rigidly connected and the cross strut being located adjacent the pivot axis of the leg and main braces to limit the pivotal movement of the braces during erection.

11. A chair according to claim 10, wherein the lower parts of the leg braces and main braces are spread apart by additional cross struts rigidly connected towards the lower ends of each pair of braces.

12. A chair according to claim wherein the upper parts of the main braces .are bent so as to form an approximately vertical back in the erected position of the frame.

13. A chair according to claim 10, wherein the upper parts of the rear leg braces are bent so as to lie in a main braces so that their lower parts form the respective rear legs, a chair seat supported at the front on the upper parts of said rear leg braces, said chair seat being of flexible material and including a back forming portion for securing to said V-shaped frame, a seat portion, a pilch portion which is turned up and a belt member for securing said pilch portion to said main braces when a child is supported on the seat, a cross strut extending between the members of a pair of braces adjacent the pivot axis of the leg and main braces to limit pivotal movement of the braces during erection, additional cross struts rigidly connected to each pair of braces at the lower ends of each pair, and a unitary seat and back cover of flexible material for attachment to the upper parts of the main and rear leg braces, said upper parts of the main and rear leg braces being bent to form an approximately vertical back and to lie in a substantially horizontal plane respectively.

15. A' chair according to claim 14 wherein a tray of support upon the bent portions of the leg braces to a position beneath said bent portions.

17. A chair according to claim 14, wherein said seat and back cover comprises also a pilch and body belt.

18. A folding chair according to claim 1; further comprising support members rigidly connected to the upper ends of said rear leg braces and angularly related to the latter so as to be horizontally disposed when said main braces and rear leg braces are pivoted, with respect to each other, to their erected positions, and a tray member removably mounted on said support members.

19. A folding chair according to claim 18; wherein said support members extend parallel to each other and the confronting longitudinal edges of said support members are undercut, and wherein said tray member has a spacing member on its underside adapted to fit between said support members, the opposite edges of said spacing member being undercut complementary to said undercut edges of the support members so that said tray member can be slidably engaged, and withdrawn from engagement, with said support members by horizontal movement of the tray member, but lifting of said tray member is prevented when said spacing member engages said support members.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 382,884 Lathrop May 15, 1888 971,738 Engstrom Oct. 4, 1910 1,341,225 Clough May 25, 1920 1,422,915 Benson et al. July 18, 1922 2,031,109 Kersteu Feb. 18, 1936 2,077,113 Klemm Apr. 13, 1937 2,531,080 Peterson et al Nov. 21, 1950 2,542,820 Legois Feb. 20, 1951 2,618,318 Welsh -L Nov. 18, 1952 2,672,9l6 Kenncy Mar. 23, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 461,291 Great Britain Feb. 15, 1937 637,079 Great Britain May 10, 1950 671,980 Great Britain May 14, 1952

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2902084 *Apr 6, 1956Sep 1, 1959William W StevensHigh chair
US2970635 *Nov 28, 1958Feb 7, 1961Peabody Seating Company IncChair
US3011585 *Mar 30, 1959Dec 5, 1961Hamilton Cosco IncStep stool
US3024035 *Apr 25, 1960Mar 6, 1962Tapiovaara OsmoCollapsible chair or wheel chair for children or adults
US3083050 *May 16, 1960Mar 26, 1963Frank F Taylor CompanyRollable baby jump seat
US3147036 *Jun 26, 1962Sep 1, 1964Novo Ind CorpFoldable highchair
US4235474 *Jul 31, 1978Nov 25, 1980Rosenberg Linda HHarness for retaining a baby in a chair
US20100096890 *Oct 17, 2008Apr 22, 2010Brian WhitlockCollapsible portable infant chair
DE4443657A1 *Dec 8, 1994Jun 13, 1996Andreas ReindlFolding high chair for children
WO2007085876A1 *Jan 24, 2007Aug 2, 2007Armon LimitedChild's high chair
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/56, 297/171, 297/468
International ClassificationA47D1/00, A47D1/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47D1/02
European ClassificationA47D1/02