Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2792837 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1957
Filing dateSep 6, 1955
Priority dateSep 6, 1955
Publication numberUS 2792837 A, US 2792837A, US-A-2792837, US2792837 A, US2792837A
InventorsAnthony Kardos Joseph
Original AssigneeAnthony Kardos Joseph
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Improved endotracheal cuff
US 2792837 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 21, 1957 J. A. KARDOS 2,792,837

IMPROVED ENDOTRACHEAL cum" Filed Sept. '6, 1955 Fig./

Fig. 3

IN V EN TOR.

BY dfi'my Em Jaseph Anthony Kardbs United States Patent 1 2,792,837 IMPROVED ENDOTRACHEAL CUFF Joseph Anthony Kardos, Stamford, Conn. Application September 6, 1955, Serial No. 532,596 6 Claims. (Cl. 128-351) This invention relates to an appliance for use in ad ministering anesthesia, and more particularly to an improved endotracheal cufl.

In the field of anesthesia, endotracheal cults have been in use for many years. Use of the endotracheal cuflfs has made it possible to provide an almost air-tight system for a closed system for general anesthesia as used in thoracic surgery. Further, in the past, such endotracheal ends as have been devised which are satisfactory are rather expensive in construction considering the length of use thereof, and such endotracheal cults which are cheaper to produce are generally defective in construction so that air escapes readily when inflated.

The primary object of this invention resides in the provision of an endotracheal cufi? which is extremely simple in construction and inexpensive to produce, thereby permitting wide use and distribution while providing a highly efficient and effective closure in use.

These, together with the various ancillary objects and features of the invention which will become apparent as the following description proceeds, are obtained by this improved endotracheal cuff, a preferred embodiment of which has been illustrated in the accompanying drawings, by way of example only, wherein:

Figure 1 is an elevational view of the endotracheal cuff comprising the present invention;

Figure 2 is a plan view of the endotracheal cult; and

Figure 3 is a horizontal, sectional view as taken along the plane of line 3--3 in Figure 1.

With continuing reference to the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals designate similar parts throughout the variols views, reference numeral generally designates an endotracheal tube with which the endotracheal cuff, designated generally by reference numeral 12 is adapted to be utilized in combination to form the present invention. The endotracheal tube 10 is of conventional construction and the endotracheal cufi 12 is mainly formed of a piece of thin rubber tubing as is commonly used for surgical drainage. This tubing is so arranged as to form an inner wall 14 with which an outer wall 16 is integrally formed and attached at the end 18 thereof. The outer wall 16 has an end 20 extending between a flap 22 integrally formed with the inner wall 14 and folded so as to overlie a portion of the outer wall 16. The cuff 12 is cemented or otherwise afilxed to the tube 10 by means of rubber cement, as at 24. Other suitable mastics may, of course, be utilized.

Extending through an aperture 26 in the flap 22 and through an aperture 28 in the end portion 20 of the outer wall 16 is an inflating tube 30. The apertures 26 and 28 are normally about one-half the diameter of the tube 30 so as to enable this tube 30 to be received in substantially air-tight relation therein. When, of course, gas is applied under pressure through the tube 30, such as compressed air or the like, a further seal will be eflected. In order to assure against leakage of air, a suitable seal, as at 32 and 34, is provided between the flap 22 and the end 20 of the outer wall 16 and the inner wall 14 and the end 20, completely sealing the tube in position and obviating the possibility of escape of air through the sealed end of the cuff. Hence, upon application of air or other gas under pressure into the tube 30, the outer wall 16 will be inflated, as is shown in dotted lines in Figure 2, to provide a seal against the passage of gas or air into the cavities of the patient. Further, the inflation of the outer wall 16 will cause the inner wall 14 to lie flush with the endotracheal tube 10.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. An endotracheal cufr for use in combination with 1 an endotracheal tube comprising an inner tubular wall adapted to lie against an endotracheal tube and having a return peripheral flap, an outer tubular wall having one end integral with said inner wall and a free end received between said flap and said inner wall, and means for introducing gas under pressure between said inner wall and said outer wall.

2. An endotracheal cuff for use in combination with an endotracheal tube comprising an inner tubular wall adapted to lie against a endotracheal tube and having a return peripheral flap, an outer tubular wall having one end integral with said inner wall and a free end received between said flap and said inner wall, and an inflating tube extending through said flap and said outer wall for introducing gas under pressure between said inner wall and said outer wall.

3. An endotracheal cuff for use in combination with an endotracheal tube comprising an inner tubular wall adapted to lie against an endotracheal tube and having a return peripheral flap, an outer tubular wall having one end integral with said inner wall and a free end received between said flap and said inner wall, and means for introducing gas under pressure between said inner wall and said outer wall, and a seal of cement between said flap and said free end of said outer wall and between said free end of said outer wall and said inner wall.

4. An endotracheal cuff for use in combination with an endotracheal tube comprising an inner tubular wall adapted to lie against an endotracheal tube and having a return peripheral flap, an outer tubular wall having one end integral with said inner wall and a free end received between said flap and said inner wall, and an inflating tube extending through said flap and said outer wall for introducing gas under pressure between said inner wall and said outer wall, and a seal of cement between said flap and said free end of said outer wall and between said free end of said outer wall and said inner wall.

5. An endotracheal cuff for use in combination with an endotracheal tube comprising an inner tubular wall adap ted to lie against an endotracheal tube and having a return peripheral flap, an outer tubular wall having one end integral with said inner wall and a free end received between said flap and said inner wall, and means for introducing gas under pressure between said inner wall and said outer wall, said cuir' being bonded to said endotracheal tube.

6. An endotracheal cuff for use in combination with an endotracheal tube comprising an inner tubular wall adapted to lie against an endotracheal tube and having a return peripheral flap, an outer tubular wall having one end integral with said inner wall and a free end received between said flap and said inner wall, and an inflating tube extending through said flap and said outer wall for introducing gas under pressure between said inner wall and said outer wall, and a seal of cement between said flap and said free end of said outer wall and between said free end of said outer wall and said inner wall, said cuff being bonded to said endotracheal tube.

Australia June 4, 1953 H RI WIQ' J II l)

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
AU151721B * Title not available
GB693510A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2883986 *Sep 24, 1957Apr 28, 1959Davol Rubber CoEndotracheal cuff
US3205890 *Sep 24, 1962Sep 14, 1965Dritz IrwinCuff for tubular elements
US3211152 *Nov 15, 1961Oct 12, 1965Ernest A SternSafety endotracheal tube cuff
US3417753 *Dec 5, 1967Dec 24, 1968Mattler MartinDisposable catheter and method for forming same
US3495586 *Jul 21, 1966Feb 17, 1970Regenbogen EberhardRectoscope with spreading means
US3731692 *Mar 19, 1971May 8, 1973Foregger CoTracheotomy or endotracheal tube cuff
US3889676 *Mar 30, 1973Jun 17, 1975Ezem CoEnemata administering device
US5881726 *Oct 30, 1997Mar 16, 1999Smiths Industries Public Limited CompanyLaryngeal mask airways and their manufacture
US7073503 *Jun 10, 2005Jul 11, 2006Vagn Niels Finsen LomholtRespiration catheter with sealing cuff and gas inflation cut-off valve
US20050274382 *Jun 10, 2005Dec 15, 2005Vagn Niels Finsen LomholtRespiration catheter with sealing cuff and gas inflation cut-off valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/207.15, 604/103
International ClassificationA61M16/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61M16/04
European ClassificationA61M16/04