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Publication numberUS2793385 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1957
Filing dateNov 29, 1952
Priority dateNov 29, 1952
Publication numberUS 2793385 A, US 2793385A, US-A-2793385, US2793385 A, US2793385A
InventorsPauline A Ortega
Original AssigneePauline A Ortega
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum cleaner nozzle
US 2793385 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

i 28, 1957 M. DE J. ORTEGA 2,793,385

VACUUM CLEANER NOZZLE Filed Nov. 29, 1952 Quiz 13 INVENTOR.

MAE/0 .0: (L 027564 ATTOEIVL'X United States Patent VACUUM CLEANER NOZZLE Mario De I. Ortega, Asharoken Beach, N. Y.; Pauline A. Ortega, administratrix of said Mario De J. Ortega, deceased Application November 29, 1952, Serial No. 323,283

Claims. (Cl. 15-367) This invention relates to improvements in cleaning devices and more particularly to devices of the type which are adapted for washing and cleaning smooth hard surfaces, such as, for example, glass, with water or with an aqueous or other liquid cleaning solution.

It is one of the objects of my invention to construct a squeegee of the kind ordinarily used for washing windows or the like which is designed for use with an aspirator device which draws up the surplus liquid and provides a drying action for the cleaned surface.

Another object of my invention is to provide a novel combination of a squeegee and a brush, or another cleaning device similar to a brush, designed for attachment to a suction device.

Still another object of my invention is to provide a novel squeegee-aspirator device of the character described having highly improved means for mounting a brush or similar cleaning member thereon.

A further object of my invention is to provide a novel squeegee-aspirator of the class described which includes a sponge-like brush, or similar cleaning member which shall be so arranged that the vacuum aspirator will actconjointly on both the squeegee and the brush.

Still a further object of my invention is to provide an improved compact, hydraulic vacuum cleaner nozzle, formed in one piece of semi-soft rubber or other reinforced yielding material, frictionally attachable to the tapered end of a vacuum cleaner suction tube, and having a special configuration for maximum efficiency.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved hydraulic vacuum cleaner nozzle in which the front or forward wall thereof terminates in a brush, of suitable material, cast into and forming an integral part of the wall, which additionally defines the frontal. edge of the air inlet cavity.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a novel angular configuration of a vacuum cleaner nozzle, and the lateral grooves or air channels around the front wall, as a result of the novel construction, whereby there is facilitated, While scrubbing with liquids, the aspiration into the air cavity of the nozzle, of the liquid substances collected in the corners formed by the walls of vessels or of rooms in which the device is employed.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved device of the character described, which is simple in design, inexpensive to manufacture, and highly elfective in use.

This invention is a continuation-in-part of my copending patent application, Serial Number 199,113, filed December 4, 1950, for Vacuum Squeegee Device, now abandoned.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description of a preferred embodiment thereof as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, forming a part hereof, and in which Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of a nozzle accordingly constructed and arranged to the invention;

Patented May 28, 1957 Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken substantially on plane 2--2 of Figure 1;

Fig. 3 is a bottom plan view taken substantially on view-plane 3-3 of Figure 1;

Fig. 3a is a view taken substantially on view-plane 3a-3a of Figure 2, the view being in fragment;

Fig. 4 is a front elevational view showing a modified form of the invention of the type as disclosed in Figures 4 to 7 inclusive of my copending patent application Serial No. 199,113, filed December 4, 1950, for Vacuum Squeegee Device, now abandoned, of which this application is a continuation in part;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken on plane 55 of Figure 4;

Fig. 6 is a bottom plan view taken substantially on plane 6-6 of Figure 4; and

Fig. 7 is a view taken substantially on view plane 77 of Figure 5.

In order to understand clearly the nature of the invention and the best means for carrying it out, reference may now be had to the drawings, in which like numerals denote similar parts throughout the several views.

In Figure 4 of the drawings, I have shown a form of the invention which is particularly suitable for washing floors and the like surfaces. As shown, the throat portion 12 of the hollow body member 11 is provided with an internally tapered receptacle portion 13 adapted to receive a hose or other connection from a vacuum producing device. Squeegee blade 17 is carried by the rear lip 16 and is clamped thereto by a horizontally extending bar 18 which is secured to rear lip 16 by a plurality of screws 21.

The front lip 15 is provided with a forwardly and downwardly extending portion 30 which forms a transverse slot adapted to receive a brush or other similar cleaning member 31. The brush 31 is held in position by a plurality of screws 32.

As may best be seen in Figure 6, the squeegee member 17 may be provided at its ends with forwardly extending ear portions 33. The ear portions extend into proximity to the brush 31 and serve to reduce air leakage at the lateral extremities of the device, and to cause the aspiratory action to take place insofar as practicable through the brush 31. The bar 18 is shown bent at its extremities at 34 in order to conform to the shape of ears 33 of squeegee member 17.

In operation, using the embodiment of the invention illustrated in Figure 4, a hose or other connection to a vacuum producing device is connected to the receptacle portion 13 of body member 11. The brush 31 is dipped in water or other suitable cleaning solution, and is then applied to the surface to be cleaned. The dirt is loosened from the surface by scrubbing or wiping with the wet brush. This results in surplus dirt bearing cleaning solution which remains on the cleaned surface. By moving the device over the surface to be cleaned, the brush 31 loosens the dirt and causes it to mingle with the liquid. The dirty liquid is then aspirated by air passing through brush 31 into the interior of the hollow body member 11. The cleaning action is completed by a squeegee member 17. As seen in the illustrations, the portion 30 of the device is recessed to receive the brush portion 31, which is held in place against wall 15 by.means of the screws 32 penetrating the wall of the recess and into the brush base. Similarly, the rubber squeegee member or blade 17 is disposed in a recess formed between a wall of the portion 16 of the body and the pressure plate 18, which in turn is held in positon by means of the screws 21 which penetrate both the wall of the body portion 16, the rubber squeegee member 17 and the pressure plate 18, holding them securely together.

As seen best in Figure 6, the opposite ends 33 of the squeegee 17 are inclined inwardly toward the brush 31, so as to gather and sweep the water in this direction without leakage endwise, toward and into recess 90, whence suction from 'outlet 13 is applied to pull the water therethrough.

Referring now to the embodiment shown in Figures 1 to 3a, it is seen that there is an internally tapered tubul-ar receptacle portion 13a adapted to receive a hose or other connection from a vacuum producing device. The bore 40 thus forms a communicating inlet or duct between the vacuum producing source and the vestibule portion 42 formed inside the sloping shoulders 44 and 46, and the opposed walls 48 and 50, it being observed that the converging walls 48 and 50 thus narrow down the path of suction influx as seen in Figure 2, while the shoulders 44 and 46 broaden it out sidewise somewhatf From Figure 2 it is seen that a shoulder wall 52 is formed which is substantially at right angles to the plane of wall 48, and thenexten'ds downwardly as at 54 to location 56, forming a recess 53 inside which is disposed a bristle brush 60.

As seen best in Figures 1 and 3, the end edges 62 and 64 of the bristle brush are mutually convergent in a downward direction as viewed in Figure 3, broadening out somewhat toward the top of Figure 3, and the brush may be held in position by any suitable means, as for example, adhesively, by means of adhesive material disposed along the edges of the bristle brush base which abut the walls such as wall 54 of the device. The lower ends of the bristles forming the brush are thus able to reach downwards as seen in Figures 1 and 2, for brushing engagement with a floor, window, wall or other surface for cleaning the same.

At the same time, it is seen that the rearward wall or lip portion 70 of the device body is integral with the upper wall portion 50, and extends downwards as seen in Figure 2, in a direction substantially parallel with that of the curtain wall or lip portion 54, but spaced therefrom, to define the hollow passageway 72 between walls 70 and 54. A portion of the passage 72 is occupied by the bristle brush 60 as already explained. From Figures 1, 2 and 3, it is seen also that the end walls 74 and 76 are integral at their lower ends as seen in Figure 3, with the thickened wall 70, and are also integral with curtain wall 54 where they abut the same as seen in Figures 1 and 3. The end walls 74 and 76 are mutually divergent in an upward direction as seen best in Figure 3, and coact with wall 70 to gather and squeegee the water or other clean-- ing fluid or solution as the device moves in the direction of the arrow 80 as seen in Figures 2 and 3. Hence, the cleaning fiuid or solution, after the scrubbing operation by the brush 60, is gathered by the walls 70, 74 and 76 in the hollow space 42 on the inside thereof and in position for being sucked up inside pipe 40 and into the receptacle connected thereto under the influence of vacuum applied thereto, together with any dirt, debris and the like picked up in the process.

It is also seen from Figures 1 and 3, that the end walls 74 and 76 are separated from the abutting edges of the bristle brush 60, forming narrow spaces or ports 82 and 84 for the entrance of air as a result of the suction. By this construction, in which the entire body, including all the walls shown in Figures 1 to 3a except the bristle brush, are made of semi-soft rubber or other yielding reinforced material, and in which the air currents are led into a nozzle air inlet cavity, enclosed on all sides, except for two channels 82 and 84 located between the ends of the brush 60 and the lateral angular projection walls 74 and 76, makes it possible for the total volume of the air current entering at high velocity into the inlet cavity of the nozzle to exert a maximum lifting force on the fluid gathered in front of the rear wall 70 or squeegee, during the forward movement of the nozzle, where the air current causes the liquid to slide upwardly along the continuous surface of the wall and into the suction apparatus, while, at the same time, it completely dries the cleaned floor or surface, during this action. This angular configuration of the nozzle and the lateral grooves or air channels around the front wall facilitates, while scrubbing with liquids, the aspiration into the air cavity of the nozzle, of the liquid substances collected in the corners formed by the walls of vessels or of rooms.

This hydraulic vacuum cleaner nozzle thus permits scrubbing floors with liquid substances and gathering the spent or used fluid into the suction apparatus, while, at the same time, drying the cleaned surface by the proper channeling of the air currents.

Although I have described my invention in specific terms, it will be understood that various changes may be made in size, shape, materials and arrangement without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim: v

1. In a cleaning device of the character described, a hollow body member adapted for connection to such producing means, said body member comprising first and second substantially parallel spaced lip portions defining a hollow area therebetween, said second lip portion comprising a squeegee member having its lower edge extending to a lower level than the lower edge of said first lip portion, and brush means comprising a continuous wall of brush material seated against said first lip portion and extending below the lower edge of said first lip portion to the same level of the lower edge of said second lip portion, the ends of said second lip portion comprising a pair of elements that are outwardly divergent in a direction towards said'first lip portion, said brush means being l aterally' spaced from said second lip portion to define therebetween a fluid passageway and being spaced at each end from the adjacent divergent element of said second lip portion to define a port therebetween, whereby communication is provided between said hollow area and the exterior of said body member when said device is placed into operative position on a work surface, said wall of brush material being substantially thicker in a transverse direction than the combined widths of said ports between each extremity ofsaid brush means and each said adjacent element.

2. The construction according to claim 1, wherein said ends of said second lip portion are integral with said first and second lip portions and mutually divergent in a direction from said second lip portion to said first lip portion, the lower edges of said ends of said second lip portion extending into the plane of the lower edge of said second lip portion for exerting squeegee action therewith, said continuous wall of brush material being substantially thicker in a transverse direction than the transverse dimension of said fluid passageway, whereby fluid fiow therethrough is impeded by said brush means thereby increasing the velocity of fluid flow through said ports adjacent to the ends thereof and providing direct communication between the interior and exterior of said hollow body member.

3. The construction according to claim 1, wherein said ends of said second lip portion are integral with said first and second lip portions and mutually divergent in a direction from said second lip portion to said first lip port-ion, the lower edges of said ends of said second lip portion extending into the plane of the lower edge of said second lip portion and being formed of identical semisoft rubber material for exerting squeegee action therewith, the ends of said brush being mutually divergent and substantially parallel to said ends of said second lip portion, and wherein said ends of said second lip portion are spaced from the ends of said brush to define air entrance channels providing direct communication between the interior and exterior of said hollow body member, and whereby, up on application of suction, the total volume of the air, current entering at high velocity into the inlet cavity of the nozzle exerts lifting force on the cleaning fluid gathered in front of the said second lip portion during forward moion of the device, the air current causing the liquid to slide into the device and simultaneously drying the cleaned surface following scrubbing with the brush.

4. In a cleaning device as set forth in claim 1, wherein said brush means is removably secured to said first lip portion.

5. A cleaning device as in claim 4, in which said squeegee member is provided at its ends with diverging ear portions which project into proximity to said brush means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Baker Feb. 14, Orr Jan. 2, Replogle Mar. 19, Thompson Nov. 21,

FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Jan. 7, Great Britain Apr. 11, Great Britain June 11, Germany July 15,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US983971 *Oct 26, 1909Feb 14, 1911Roy C BakerPneumatic cleaning implement.
US1210525 *Sep 27, 1915Jan 2, 1917William V OrrSuction cleaning device.
US1994868 *Mar 14, 1925Mar 19, 1935Citizens Trust CompanyAir-method cleaning tool
US2531370 *Sep 13, 1945Nov 21, 1950Thompson Lyman FLiquid discharging and collecting apparatus for cleaning
DE647863C *Jul 15, 1937Heinrich SchoerlingMit Unterdruck arbeitende Strassenkehr- und Entstaubungsmaschine
GB199338A * Title not available
GB190500375A * Title not available
GB191109019A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2974348 *Feb 16, 1955Mar 14, 1961Wessel HansVacuum cleaner nozzle
US3009261 *Aug 28, 1958Nov 21, 1961Johnson CorpSyphon pipe shoe
US3069716 *Feb 11, 1960Dec 25, 1962Signal Mfg CoVacuum cleaner nozzle and attachment
US3833962 *Apr 17, 1972Sep 10, 1974Allstar Verbrauchsgueter GmbhNozzle for vacuum cleaner
US5311638 *Jul 2, 1993May 17, 1994The Regina CompanyCleaning device
US7975339 *Jul 20, 2004Jul 12, 2011Gavney Jr James AAquatic scrubber
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/367, 15/374, 15/117, 15/400, 15/401
International ClassificationA47L9/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/0613, A47L9/0626, A47L9/06
European ClassificationA47L9/06, A47L9/06B6, A47L9/06B2