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Publication numberUS2793652 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1957
Filing dateJun 11, 1954
Priority dateJun 11, 1954
Publication numberUS 2793652 A, US 2793652A, US-A-2793652, US2793652 A, US2793652A
InventorsEvans Robert J
Original AssigneeEvans Robert J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid collection and return device
US 2793652 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 8, 1957 R. J. EVANS 2,793,652

LIQUID COLLECTION AND RETURN DEVICE Filed June 11, 1954 F/ G. i.

F| LTEE EXTBACTOE WASH E2 4 23 PUM EETUEN TANK [D v V T g INVENTOR. B05527 u. EVA/V6,

United States Patent j 2,793,652 LIQUID COLLECTION AND RETURN DEVICE Robert J. Evans, El Reno, Okla. Application JuneII 1954, Serial No. 436,174

1 Claim. ((1137-399) cally ceases operation when the quantity of liquid to be returned is reduced to a small amount, in order to avoid injecting any air into the cleaning system.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description considered in conjunction with the attached drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic elevational view showing a device according to the present invention as inserted in a conventional dry cleaning system.

Figure 2 is a vertical longitudinal section through the said device.

Referring now to the drawings in more detail, and particularly to Figure l, the reference numeral 10 designates generally the illustrated device, which is shown as inserted in a conventional dry cleaning system which includes an extractor 11 and a first conduit 12 having one end con nected to the intake of the pump 14 and having its other end connected to a source containing spent dry cleaning liquid, specifically a washer 15. The outlet of the pump 14 is connected to a filter 16 from which a return line 17 conducts the filtered cleaning liquid to the washer 15.

The device 10 collects spent dry cleaning liquid draining from the extractor 11 and the spent liquid passes through the conduit 12 to the pump 14. The device 10 includes a tank 18 having a bottom 18a and a side wall 18b. The tank 18 is provided in the top 18c with an opening 23 for ready inspection of and access to the interior thereof. An inlet 19 traverses an upper part of the side wall 18b and an outlet conduit 20 traverses the side wall 18b below the inlet 19, the conduit 20 having an inner end portion 2011 within the tank 18 and an outer end portion 20b outside the tank 18. A second conduit 21 connects the extractor 11 to the tank inlet 19, and a third conduit 22 connects the tank outlet 20 to the first conduit 12. As will be apparent from Figure 2, the inner and outer end portions 20a and 20b are horizontal. The inner end portion 20a has a first axial passage 20c ex tending therethrough, the passage 200 having a terminal inner end 20c through which the said passage opens. The passage 20c has an enlarged diameter portion which is spaced from the terminal end 20e of the inner end portion 20a and defines a first valve chamber 26. A valve seat 25 is at the end of the first valve chamber 26 remote from the terminal end 202 of the inner end portion 20a. A lateral upwardly facing port 24 traverses the inner end portion 20a and opens into the first chamber 26. A valve stem 28 works in the first passage 200, the stem having 2 an inner end-27 extending beyond the terminal inner end 20a and an outer end 27a positioned in the first chamber 26. A valve head 27b is on the outer end 27a for engagement with the valve seat 25.

A float arm 32 is pivotally mounted on the inner end portion 20a of the conduit 20 and is operatively connected to the inner end 28of the valve stem 27. As shown in Figure 2, the arm 32 has a float on one end and has the other end attached tothe upper end of an upstanding lever 33, the lever being pivotally connected intermediate its ends as at 35 to a bracket 34 carried by the inner end portion 20a of the conduit 20. The lower end of the lever 33 is connected to the valve stem 27 inwardly of the inner end 28 thereof: The outer end portion 20b of the conduit 20 has a second axial passage 26g which communicates with and is aligned with the first passage 20c of the inner end portion 20a of the conduit 20. The

second passage 20g has an inner end ZOh communicaIing with the first passage 20c and an enlarged diameter portion between the ends of the second passage 20g and defining a second valve chamber 37. A valve seat 38 is on the ends of the second chamber adjacent the first passage 20c, and a check' valve 36 in the second chamber 37 is normally in closing engagement with the seat 38 in the valve chamber 37. The check valve is free to swing outwardly away from its seating position and the movement of liquid outwardly from the tank 18 through the conduit 22 swings the check valve 36 to the open position. Any backward flow of liquid in the conduit 22, however, toward the tank 18, will swing the check valve 36 downwardly against the seat 38, closing the conduit 22 and preventing the movement of the liquid backwardly into the tank 18.

A hand actuable valve 39 may be inserted in the conduit 22, exteriorly of the chamber 37, for positively shutting off the conduit 22 when the device of the present invention is not in use.

It will be apparent from the foregoing description that the device of the present invention affords a simple and automatic means for collecting dry cleaning liquid extracted by the extractor 11 from clothes which have come from a washer 15 and for returning the liquid so collected into the dry cleaning system. As the dry cleaning liquid is extracted from the clothes in the extractor 11, it drains 4: through the conduit 21 into the tank 13. When the level of liquid in the tank 18 becomes sufliciently high to raise the float 30, the movement of the lever 31, connecting the float 30 and the valve 26, causes the opening of the valve 26 and permits the liquid to enter the conduit 22. Inasmuch as the other end of the conduit 22 is connected to the intake of the pump 14, the liquid entering the conduit 22 from the tank 18 will be drawn through the conduit 22, so long as the valve 39 is open, and will be pumped together with other liquid coming directly from the washer through the conduit 12, into the filter 16 where it will be cleaned and finally discharged again through the supply line 17 to the washer 15. The check valve 36 will be swung upwardly by the movement of the liquid outwardly from the tank 18 through the conduit 22 and will offer no resistance to the passage of the liquid in that direction. When the level of the liquid in the tank 18 falls, the float 30 will fall with it and, through the lever 31 will move the valve 36 into seating position upon the valve seat 25, closing the conduit 22 and preventing further liquid from escaping from the tank 18. The position of the float 30 is so adjusted that it will cause the closing of the valve 26 before the level of the liquid in the tank 18 falls below the level of the opening 24 into the conduit 22. This adjustment prevents air from being drawn into the conduit 22 from the tank 18, as would be the case if the valve 26 remained open after the liquid level had fallen below that of the opening 24. The open- P'atente d May 28, 1957 ing 23 in the top of the tank 18 permits ready access to the interior of the tank for cleaning, adjustment of the float 30, or for any other purpose. It will be evident that the addition of the device of the present invention to an existing dry cleaning system will be a simple and inexpensive matter, inasmuch as the device utilizes the pump already in the system and its installation requires no substantial alteration of the system.

What is claimed is:

A device of the character described, a tank having a bottom and a side wall, an inlet traversing an upper part of the side wall, an outlet conduit traversing said side wall below said inlet, said conduit having an inner end portion within the tank and an outer end portion outside of the tank, said inner and outer end portions being horizontal, said inner end portion having a first axial passage extending therethrough and having a terminal inner end through which said first passage opens, said first passage having an enlarged diameter portion spaced from the terminal end of the inner end portion and defining a first valve chamber and a valve seat at the end of the first chamber remote from said terminal end, a lateral upwardly facing port traversing said inner end portion and opening into said first chamber, a valve stem working in said first passage, said stem having an inner end extending beyond the said terminal end and an outer end positioned in said first chamber, a valve head on said outer end of the stem for engagement with said seat, .a float arm pivotally mounted on said inner end portion of the conduit and operatively connected to the inner end of the valve stem, said outer end portion of the conduit having a second axial passage communicating with and aligned with said first axial passage of the inner end portion of the conduit, said second passage having an inner end communicating with the first passage and an enlarged diameter portion between the ends of the second passage defining a second valve chamber, a valve seat on the end of the second chamber adjacent to said first passage, and a check valve in said second chamber normally, in closing engagement with the seat in the second valve chamber.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 522,668 Nagle July, 10, 1894 1,271,599 Messer July 9, 1918 1,775,860 La Bour Sept. 16, 1930 1,795,006 Boiney Mar. 3, 1931 1,803,905 Kinzbach May 5, 1931 1,920,469 Jones Aug. 1, 1933 2,198,412 McDonald Apr. 23, 1940 FOREIGN PATENTS 472,170 Italy of 1950

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US522668 *Apr 4, 1894Jul 10, 1894 Steam-trap
US1271599 *Feb 2, 1915Jul 9, 1918Maurce E MesserMethod of cleaning garments.
US1775860 *Jan 5, 1927Sep 16, 1930La Bour Harry EPumping system
US1795006 *Oct 12, 1927Mar 3, 1931Boiney Joseph FMethod and apparatus for dry cleaning
US1803905 *May 8, 1928May 5, 1931 Valve mechanism
US1920469 *Jun 8, 1929Aug 1, 1933Sharples Specialty CoWool scouring
US2198412 *Jan 2, 1935Apr 23, 1940Engineering IncRemoval and recovery of solvent
IT472170B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3132501 *May 27, 1963May 12, 1964Gen Motors CorpDry cleaning system with a replaceable filter cartridge and means for venting solvent fumes
US4441340 *Feb 18, 1982Apr 10, 1984Darryl KaplanEnergy saving laundry system
US5318407 *Sep 8, 1992Jun 7, 1994Foppe Thelen Group, Inc.Check valve having internal float
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/399, 68/18.00F, 118/602
International ClassificationD06F43/02, D06F43/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F43/02
European ClassificationD06F43/02