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Publication numberUS2797817 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1957
Filing dateApr 1, 1955
Priority dateApr 1, 1955
Publication numberUS 2797817 A, US 2797817A, US-A-2797817, US2797817 A, US2797817A
InventorsShugarman Alvin E
Original AssigneeVaco Products Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Display and storage rack
US 2797817 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 2, 1957 A. E. SHUGARMAN DISPLAY AND STORAGE RACK Filed April 1, 1955 United States PatentCfiYice Patented July 2, 1957 DISPLAY AND STORAGE RACK Alvin E. Shugarman, Chicago, lll assignor to Vaco Products Company, Chicago, EL, a corporation of Iliinois Application April 1, 1955, Serial No. 498,523

Claims. (Cl. 211-96) This ,invention relates to racks and supporting devices. More particularly .it relates to positionable brackets whereon supporting fingers or hooks may be adjustably positioned for holding tools and otherobjects of various sizes and shapes.

In the case of .known supporting devices of the type disclosed herein, there are certain disadvantages which;

are inherent in their constructions. They are not readily adaptable to instances where a single form ofhook may be adjustably positioned so as to support objects of various shapes and sizes. To the contrary, they require special forms of fixtures and accessories for each different object to be carried thereby. More often than not, these fixtures and accessories, which are supported on a perforated backing board, can be used only on the board upon which they are intended to be supported, and can be used to support only that object they are designed to hold. They lack the degree of simplicity and standardization which permits easy adjustment to meet the demandsof any problem which may arise.

Other known hook structures further have another serious defect in that they inherently must be loosely *fittedonto the supporting panel board in -order to fulfill their intended use of being removable and positionable at-any desired location on the board. Theiresult is that they are easily.dislodged.from their positionon the board when-articles are placed .on them oradjacent hooks, 'or when articles are removed therefrom.

Accordingly, it is anobject of thisinventionto :over- .come .these and other unfavorable conditions resulting from the use of the previous adjustable hook and bracket I structures.

Aprincipal object of this invention ;is to provide both a bracket construction which is readily placeableat any desired location on aperforated backing-board andhooks which are .-readil-y shiftable to any position on-the :bracket, and to further provide means for preventing thebrackets and hooks rfrom being :accidently dislodged from their respective supports.

Another object of this invention is to provide a rack which may be used for either storage or; display purposes, and which has detachable one piece hooks for holding the various articles'to be stored or displayed.

Another feature of this invention isto provide anovel construction which allows the brackets to be supported on the supporting backing board in such a manner as-to permit the brackets-to present a modular effector an uninterrupted line of brackets when so desired.

A specific object of this invention is to provide a bracket adapted to be used on-perforated backing boards and which has a plurality of seats spaced apart by any desired distance, and to further provide a hook which may beatttached 011 the-bracket at any predetermined seat and whichis free from lateral movement when once mounted thereon.

Another and further object of this inventionis to provide a display or storage rack device which is inexpensive and simple to manufacture, and one which is durable in construction and easyto assemble for holding various articles of many sizes and shapes. The backing board and bracket provide a maximum amount of positions in which the hooks may be placed, allowing the user to meet the requirements of most situations which may arise. The hooks and brackets, further, are of such design as to allow for standardization of equipment which may be used for a variety of purposes.

The objects mentioned and implied from the foregoing discussion are achieved by a one-piece bracket having a plurality of seats spaced from its plane for receiving the supporting hooks, and further having rearwardly projecting ears adapted to support the bracket on a perforated board. The hooks generally are one-piece extruded members which are punched formed to shape and specifically to have a flat end portion adapted to enter the seats onthe bracket. A slight embossment may be placed on either the bracket or hook at such a location as to cooperate with .an indentation on the other member so that When the hook is seated on the bracket, the cooperating embossment and indentation prevent the hook from being accidently-dislodged from its seat.

The foregoing and other objects, advantages and features of construction are disclosed hereafter in detail with the accompanying drawings. It is to be understood, however, that the drawings and accompanying exposition are illustrative only, and that the invention, its objects and features of construction arenot restricted to the particular details recited in the specification or shown in the drawings.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a perforated backing board with bracket and hooks mounted thereon.

Figure 2 .is a sectional view on an enlarged scale taken on lines 22 in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a view looking at the bracket in the direction of the arrows on lines 3-3 in Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a view of the blank from which the bracket shown in Figure l is formed.

, Figure 5 is a modified. form of the invention.

Figure 6 is a sectional view taken on lines 66 in Figure 5.

Figure 7 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to those shown in Figures 2 and 6, but showing (another modification of the invention.

Figure '8 is another fragmentary sectional view showing still anothermodification of the invention.

The bracket and hooks comprising this invention are intended .to be used .on a perforated backing board of the type commonly used fordecorative effect in the home, in an office, or in a display area; or the backing board may be of the type used for heavy duty work like storingtools in a factory tool room, a work shop or a garage. The boards usually vary from approximately /s to A of an inch thick and may have perforations on a variety of center distances and patterns. The brackets comprising this invention are adaptable to being made so that they may be supported by perforations on any center distance. However, one preferred. board, and one which is most commonly used, has perforations on one inch centers, since the design of the herein disclosed brackets and hooks still permits adjustment of the distances between hooks so that they can be arranged less than A of an inch apart. Theboard may be made of any suitable material such as metal, plastic, wood, or fiberboard.

Referring in detail to Figure 1, there is shown a part of a backing board 11 having vertically and horizontally aligned holes or perforations 12. Mounted to the board is a bracket member 1-3 adapted to hold supporting hooks hereinafter described.

As shown in Figure 4, bracket 13 is formed from .a blank 13a suitably cut from sheet metal, and comprises it is to fit.

a central body portion 14, two laterally extending ear portions 15, and a lower ear or lug portion 16. The lower edge of the blank also has two notches 1717 for a purpose to be hereinafter described. During the shaping process a plurality of paired sockets 1818 are die cut and pressed outwardly from the plane of the central body portion 14 to form a plurality of seats 19 whereon the hooks are supported. As the paired sockets are cut, the peripheral portion of the blank is bent in an opposite direction (on the dotted lines shown in Figure 4) to form a strengthening flange 29 about the entire body portion 14, while the ears 1515 and lug 16 portions are projected rearwardly so that they are positioned to enter the backing board perforations 12 and mount the bracket 13 thereto. When the bracket is in finished form, the lower margin of the body portion 14 is defined by two slightly downwardly inclined converging edges 21-21, which meet at a median line running vertically through the body and whereat the lug 16 is positioned. Thus, when ears 1515 are projected through perforations 12 in the backing board, lug 16 is positioned midway between the ears and adapted to enter a perforation in a lower row of perforations.

Referring to Figures 13, each ear 15 comprises a neck portion 22 of sufiicient length to pass through the backing board 11 and an upwardly extending head portion 23 adapted to engage the back side 24 of the board. The ears are hinged upwardly and away from the direction of the load on a seat 19, so that the head portions 23 prevent slipping of the cars from the perforations and swinging of the bracket about fulcrum points formed by the perforations 12 wherein the ears are inserted, while the neck portions 22 help to support the bracket on backing board 11.

Lug 16 also comprises a head portion 25 substantially circular in shape and a neck portion 26 adapted to project at least the greater portion of head 25 through the perforation wherein it is inserted. The head 25 is preferably made slightly larger than the diameter of the perforation 12, so that a slight pressure is required in order to seat lug 16 in a perforation. The coaction of the lug 16 and perforation 12 is similar to that of a snapping action and serves to prevent the bracket from being inadvertently unseated from the board 11. The lug 16 is also slightly rounded to follow the circumference of the supporting perforation 12, and hence'pro vides a secure seat for the bracket while also serving to distribute the bracket load over a considerable area of the perforation, thus preventing shearing of the backing board at the perforations.

To mount bracket 13 in position on the backing board 11, the heads 23 of cars 1515 are first introduced into the selected perforations while the bracket body portion 14 is held approximately perpendicular to the backing board. A swinging movement is then imparted to the bracket until lug 16 engages the perforation wherein The lug is then snapped into place and the bracket is held in proper position by the cooperation of each ear 1515 and lug 16 with its respective perforation 12, as shown in Figures 1 through 3. When removing the bracket from its mounted position, a hook or nail is inserted into one of the spaces created by the notches 1717 between the flange 20 and board 11, anxl a slight prying action readily removes the lug from its perforation, after which the bracket may be easily swung away from the board.

Each hook 27 is a one-piece shaped extruded member, generally circular in cross-section and bent at one end to form a depending support portion 28 adapted to enter and be held in bracket seat 19. At its other end 29, the hook may be bent upwardly slightly so as to prevent falling of articles hanging therefrom, or the hook may be specially bent to conform to the contour of the article to be held thereby. The support portion 28 is stamped to form a flat body which snugly fits in 4 the bracket seats. Each bracket seat, when die cut and stamped, is formed so as to present a fiat front and back portion 30, 31 respectively, which together with the flat support portions 28 cooperate to prevent any swinging or lateral movement of the hook.

The distance between the ears 1515 on each bracket 13 is determined by the distance between the perforations on the board 11 which is used. For example, if the perforations are on one inch centers, the distance between the ears is made some multiple of one inch. As shown in Figure 1, this distance would then be two inches, with lug 16 being midway between the ears and positioned to enter a perforation on a lower row of perforations. If a larger bracket were used on the same board, the distance between the ears is increased by some even multiple of one inch so that the lug 16 can be on a vertical midline through the bracket and still be in position to enter a perforation. In actual practice, however, the distance between the ears 1515 is made slightly less than the calculated distance in order that the ears of two difierent brackets may enter the same perforation. This permits an arrangement of brackets in side-by-side relationship to give a modular effect or an uninterrupted line of brackets, if such pattern is desired on the backing board.

The seats 19 on each bracket may be spaced apart by any desired distance. For instance, it has been found that when the brackets have approximately a two inch span, by making the seat approximately on one-half inch centers, the hooks 27 advantageously may be positioned to hold most objects which are placed therebetween for display or storage. Thus, even an article having no means to catch on to a book, like a screw driver, may be placed between adjacent hooks and be held thereby.

Figure 5 shows a modified bracket of more simple design. The modified bracket 32 comprises an elongated or strip shaped body portion 33 on which a plurality of seats 1911 are die cut and pressed to the same form as seats 19. Adjacent to the upper end of each bracket side, ears 15a-15a, similar in shape to cars 15, are formed and projected rearwardly of the bracket body so as to enter the perforations 12 on a backing board. Bracket ears 15a15a also are so spaced apart as to allow adjacent bracket ears to enter the same perforations and give the efiect of a continuous strip of brackets 32, if so desired. The hooks 27 are held by the seats 19a in the same manner as hereinbefore described for seats 19.

When it is desired to have the distance between adjacent hooks even less than permitted by straight hooks, the hooks may be offset from their seat portions as shown in Figure 1. The offset hook 27a thus permits the adjacent hooks to hold even miniature tools and articles therebetween.

As most clearly shown in Figures 1, 2 and 5, a small embossment 34 is placed between the paired sockets 1818 forming each seat 19. The embossment is adapted to enter an indentation 35 on the flat support portion 28 of each hook 27 or 27a to hold the hook securely and in place. Thus, not only are the hooks held by the flat face and back 30, 31 of each seat 19, but they also are secured therein against accidental dislodgment by the cooperating embossment and indentation. All that need be done to place the hook in its seat is to apply a slight downwardly directed pressure to snap the hook into place. While the hook is held securely in place, it readily may be removed from the seat by using suflicient force to disengage the embossment from the cooperating indentation.

Figure 7 shows a slight modification of the hook retaining means. In this case, a small embossment or stop 36 is placed upon the upper part of the flat support portion 28 of the hook as the hook is formed. A cooperating notch or indentation 37 is provided immedijoined with the support portion 2-8 to form a spring loop 39 for securing the. hook in any seat. Thus, when the flat support portion 23 ;is,mounted in any seat, a slight downwardly directed pressure allows the .hook to slide past the upper socket 18, whereafter the coacting .portions 28, .38 spring. towardseach other, retaining the hook in position.

It will be seen that the invention has many advantages. The separate bracket and hooks are inexpensive to make and sufficiently sturdy to withstand the kind of wear that they will be subjected to. Moreover, their versatile construction allows a single form of hook to be adjustably positioned to hold many forms of objects. The hooks may be adjustably positioned in any bracket seat, and when so seated, they are free from lateral play or the danger of inadvertent removal.

The bracket and cooperating hook thus have many uses. They may be used in the kitchen to hold cooking utensils, in the garage or work shop to hold tools and the like, or they may be used as 'a means to hold decorative objects or for display pieces in salesrooms.

While the structure defined forms a satisfactory bracket and hook construction, it is to be understood that other forms may be utilized and that the embodiment herein illustrated is for the purpose of exposition only and not intended to limit and define the invention. Other such forms suggest themselves, namely, the same hooks may be individually shaped or shaped to cooperate with other hooks so formed to hold articles having different configurations.

I claim:

1. A rack comprising the combination with a panel board having vertically and horizontally aligned perforations on equal center distances; of a bracket, a plurality of sets of paired sockets spaced forwardly from the plane of said bracket, said sets of paired sockets being arranged to form a horizontal line of seats wherein support hooks may be selectively inserted, means adjacent each pair of sockets for securing any hook against accidental removal from the seat wherein it is inserted, a rearwardly directed strengthening flange on the peripheral edge of said bracket, a pair of studs extending from said flange and adapted to enter aligned perforations in said panel board to support the bracket thereon, head portions extending transversely to each stud for securing the bracket to said board, and a lug portion extending rearwardly from the bottom portion of said flange for frictionally engaging a lower perforation in said panel board for preventing accidental removal of said bracket from said panel board, said flange being notched whereby a lever may be inserted in the space between the flange and board to facilitate removal of said bracket.

2. A storage and display rack comprising the combination with a panel board having perforations on equal center distances; of a set of brackets mounted on said board, each bracket having a plurality of integral forwardly projecting sockets surrounded by an integral rearwardly projecting strengthening flange, a flat portion forming part of the inner wall of each socket, a pair of integral rearwardly and upwardly extending ears on each bracket, the distance between paired ears on a bracket being slightly less than the center-to-center distance between the perforations wherein they are inserted so that adjacent ears on adjacent brackets may enter the same perforation to allowthe presentation of an uninterrupted line of brackets, each bracket further including an integral rearwardly extending lug provided midway between its sides at its lower edge adapted to enter a panel board perforation, each lug having an external substantially rounded outline formed with a slightly downwardly extending bump adapted to follow the configuration of the perforation wherein the lug is inserted to prevent shearing of the perforation, a plurality of books, each hook having a flat portion insertable in any bracket socket and retained by the flat wall portion therein against lateral movement, andrneans cooperable with said hook flat portion for yieldably embracing the socket wherein the flat portion is inserted to thereby prevent accidental hook removal.

3. A storage and display rack comprising the combination with a panel board -having perforations on equal center distances; of a set of brackets mounted on said board, each bracket having a plurality of integral forwardly projecting sockets surrounded by an integral rearwardly projecting strengthening flange, a flat portion forming part of the inner wall of each socket, a pair of integral rearwardly and upwardly extending ears on each bracket, the distance between paired ears on a bracket being slightly less than the center-to-center distance between the perforations wherein they are inserted so that adjacent ears on adjacent brackets may enter the same perforations to allow the presentation of an uninterrupted line of brackets, each bracket further including an integral rearwardly extending lug provided midway between its sides at its lower edge adapted to enter a panel board perforation, each lug having an external substantially rounded outline formed with a slightly downwardly extending bump adapted to follow the configuration of the perforation wherein the lug is inserted to prevent shearing the perforation, a plurality of hooks, each hook having a fiat portion insertable in any bracket socket and retained by the 'flat wall portion therein against lateral movement, hook retaining means adjacent each bracket socket, and means on each hook flat portion cooperable with the retaining means associated with the socket wherein the flat portion in inserted for securing the hook against accidental dislodging.

4. The combination with a panel board having perforations on equal center distances; of a set of brackets mounted on said board, each bracket including a plurality of integral forwardly projecting sockets, and an integral rearwardly and upwardly extending ear at each of opposite bracket sides, the distance between the ears on each bracket being slightly less than the center-to-center distance between the perforations wherein they are insertable, whereby adjacent ears on adjacent brackets may enter the same perforation to allow the presentation of an uninterrupted line of brackets on said panel board, each bracket further having an integral rearwardly projecting lug below and midway between its ears, each lug having an external substantially rounded outline for frictionally entering another perforation in said panel board to prevent accidental bracket removal therefrom, a plurality of hooks, each hook having a support portion insertable in any bracket socket and engageable therewith to prevent lateral hook movement, separate hook retaining means on said brackets at each socket, and retention means on each hook support portion cooperable with the retaining means at the socket wherein the hook support portion is inserted for preventing accidental hook removal from said socket.

5. A storage and display device, comprising: a board having aligned perforations on equal center distances; a substantially fiat bracket mounted on said board, said bracket having a plurality of integral forwardly projecting sockets surrounded by a rearwardly projecting strengthening flange, a plurality of hooks, each hook including a flat support portion insertable into any bracket socket and a detent extending from said support portion;

a pair of integral rearwardly and upwardly directed ears extending from said flange, one at each of opposite bracket sides and adapted to enter aligned perforations in said board for mounting said bracket thereto; an integral rearwardly projecting lug on said bracket below and midway between said ears, said lug having an external substantially rounded outline for frictionally entering another lower perforation in said board to prevent accidental bracket removal therefrom; means for removing said bracket from said board, including a notch in said flange wherein a lever is insertable to pry said l-ug from said lower perforation; and separate paired retention means on said bracket at each socket, whereby insertion of a hook support portion into a socket engages the first retention means at the socket with the flat support portion of said hook to prevent lateral hook movement, and further releasably engages the second retention means at said socket with the detent on said support portion to prevent accidental removal of said hook from said socket.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,044,893 Lathrop Nov. 19, 1912 1,803,016 Harsted Apr. 28, 1931 1,808,040 Hyatt et a1. June 2, 1931 1,938,370 Bodkin Dec. 5, 1933 2,066,825 Cohen Jan. 5, 1937 2,096,319 Churchill Oct. 19, 1937 2,141,009 Mayer Dec. 20, 1938 2,291,178 Vanderwerp et a1 July 28, 1942 2,312,985 Bales Mar. 2, 1943 2,428,073 Handel Sept. 30, 1947 2,614,701 Mapson Oct. 21, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US1803016 *Sep 28, 1928Apr 28, 1931Victor Mfg & Gasket CoDisplay rack
US1808040 *Dec 22, 1928Jun 2, 1931Auld D L CoName plate
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US2066825 *May 26, 1936Jan 5, 1937Cohen LeonBracket for holding pocketbooks
US2096319 *Jun 25, 1936Oct 19, 1937United Carr Fastener CorpSnap fastener mounting bracket and installation thereof
US2141009 *Aug 3, 1937Dec 20, 1938Meyer Pierre HSupporting device
US2291178 *Oct 27, 1941Jul 28, 1942Alofs Herman GHanger
US2312985 *Nov 4, 1940Mar 2, 1943Lyon Metal Products IncHook
US2428073 *Sep 24, 1945Sep 30, 1947Handel Stanley TRack mounting means
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2933277 *Apr 26, 1957Apr 19, 1960Joseph A A MessierPeg board bracket
US2936902 *Jun 9, 1958May 17, 1960Gillette CoDisplay rack
US2943835 *Dec 20, 1956Jul 5, 1960Tierney Marcus MPeg board bracket
US2952343 *May 6, 1958Sep 13, 1960Modrey Henry JSupport structure for supporting articles on perforated sheet material
US2974804 *Jul 12, 1957Mar 14, 1961Puritas HardwareTool holder
US3193231 *Mar 15, 1961Jul 6, 1965John K CurryStorage device and support
US3198469 *Mar 2, 1964Aug 3, 1965Callanan Robert A EHook mountable in an apertured panel
US3216584 *Jun 25, 1963Nov 9, 1965M & D Store Fixtures IncHanger base
US3289994 *May 16, 1966Dec 6, 1966Henry BurmeisterDisplay supports
US3298530 *May 3, 1965Jan 17, 1967Robert G ClouthierFile for vertically mounted tape reels
US3333711 *Oct 18, 1965Aug 1, 1967Helmer Leo JGarment hanger
US3978612 *May 30, 1975Sep 7, 1976Oriental Buying Service, Inc.Flower pot holder
US4366906 *Oct 14, 1980Jan 4, 1983Joyce Patrick HMerchandizing holder device
US4516681 *Apr 5, 1982May 14, 1985Alfred JahelCollapsible display hanger for perforated display panels
US5183162 *May 10, 1991Feb 2, 1993Robert RitzenthalerMobile mount system
US5221009 *Feb 20, 1992Jun 22, 1993Robert RitzenthalerMobile mount system
US5318176 *Oct 9, 1990Jun 7, 1994Concept Interior A/SRail, preferably wall rail, method for the production hereof and tool herefor
US6460393 *Mar 21, 1997Oct 8, 2002Lena SundhagenMethod for forming bucklings in a plate member, tool and plate
US8602228 *Dec 8, 2011Dec 10, 2013Jaymie M. MartinezCompactable wall mounted storage assembly
WO1997036703A1 *Mar 21, 1997Oct 9, 1997Gunnar SundhagenMethod for forming bucklings in a plate member, tool and plate
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/96, 248/220.42, 211/169
International ClassificationA47F5/08, A47G25/06, A47G25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G25/0678, A47F5/0823
European ClassificationA47F5/08B1A, A47G25/06F