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Publication numberUS2797819 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1957
Filing dateMay 23, 1955
Priority dateMay 23, 1955
Publication numberUS 2797819 A, US 2797819A, US-A-2797819, US2797819 A, US2797819A
InventorsLowmaster Frank L
Original AssigneeMathews Comp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Parts bin
US 2797819 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1957 F. L. LOVWMASTER 2,797,819

' I PARTS BIN Filed y 2 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 v IN V EN TOR. flan? J 14 zap- Mi e 7' United States Patent Ofifice 2,797,819 Patented July 2, 1957 PARTS BIN Frank L. Lowmaster, Grosse Pointe, Mich, assignor to The Mathews Company, Detroit, Mich, a corporation of Michigan Application May 23, 1955, Serial No. 510,238

1 Claim. (Cl. 211-135) This invention relates to new and useful improvements in cabinet construction and more particularly to an improved cabinet of a type commonly referredto in the art as a parts bin.

The sale of cabinets of the type here under consideration is exceedingly competitive and the business goes to the manufacturer who can supply a satisfactory product at a minimum cost. The most satisfactory cabinets are made of sheet metal and improvements in this field are directed primarily to the development of novel and simplified constructions which permit the cabinet to be manufactured at a lower cost without depreciating the value and quality of the product. One way of reducing cost is to use lighter gauge and consequently less expensive sheet metal, but

the trend in this direction is limited by the fact that these cabinets are required in use to carry heavy metal parts and the cabinet of necessity must be sufiiciently strong and rigid to sustain the weight of these parts. In practice, the total weight carried by a single cabinet may exceed several tons. Further, a manufacturer can reduce manufacturing costs without sacrificing requisite strength by designing the cabinet so that it uses a minimum number of parts and wherein the parts are mechanically simple so as to be made in each instance by a single stamping and forming operation.

An important object of the present invention is to provide a parts bin in which the elements of the bin are uniquely combined and correlated to provide adequate strength using lighter gauge metal than has heretofore been possible.

Another object of the invention is to provide a parts bin in which the elements thereof are uniquely fashioned to facilitate manufacture of each element by a single stamping and forming operation.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a partsbin construction in which the individual elements of the bin are uniquely formed so that they can be easily assembled and connected together in the manufacture of the cabinet.

Yet another object of the. invention is to provide a parts-bin construction of the above-mentioned character having removable and adjustable partitions which permit the user to adapt the size of the bin compartments in accordance with the exigencies of the particular situation.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent during the course of the following description.

In the drawings forming a part of the specification and wherein like numerals are employed to designate like parts throughout the same:

Fig. l is a fragmentary perspective view showing a parts-bin cabinet construction embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical sectional view taken on the line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary, vertical sectional view taken on theline 3- 3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged view showing the portion of'Fig. 2 enclosed in the circle 4;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical sectional view taken on the line 55 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged, fragmentary, horizontal sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical sectional view taken on the line 7-7 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged, fragmentary, horizontal sectional view taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. l; and

Fig. 9 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 99 of Fig. 1.

As suggested, the parts-bin cabinet embodying the present invention is made of light-gauge sheet metal, and the main cabinet portion of the bin comprises sides 10 and 12, a top 14, a back 16, and a bottom 18.

The two side panels 10 and 12 are generally rectangular in form and they have inturned flanges 20 and 22 at the forward vertical edges thereof. The two flanges 20 and 22 are in turn formed with rearwardly directed flanges 24 and 26 respectively. Channel-pieces 28 and 30 fit snugly within the channels defined by the flanges 20, 24, and 22, 26 to impart strength and rigidity to the front of the cabinet, and these channels preferably are welded or otherwise fastened securely to the adjacent structure.

The back panel 16 also is rectangular in shape, and it is formed at opposite sides thereof with inturned flanges 32 which underlap the rear marginal edges of the side panels 10 and 12. Only one flange 32 is shown in the drawings (Fig. 8), but it will be understood that the op posite side of the back 16 is similarly formed and that it is associated with the side panel 10 in the same way as with the side panel 12. The inturned flanges 32 are spotwelded or otherwise fastened securely to the side panels 10 and 12.

The top and bottom panels 14 and 18 are generally rectangular and they are identically formed and similarly associated with the vertical walls of the cabinet. More specifically, the top and bottom panels 14 and 18 are formed at opposite sides thereof with right-angularly directed flanges 34 and 36 which underlap the side panels 10 and 12 (Fig. 7). Right-angularly bent flanges 38 and 40 along the front and rear edges of the top and bottom panels 14 and 18 respectively overlap the inturned flanges 20 and 22 of the side panels 10 and 12 at the front of the cabinet and the back panel 16 at the rear of the cabinet. All of theflanges 34, 36, 38', and 40 preferably are welded or otherwise fastened securely to the adjacent structure.

The structure described above defines a rectangular, box-like cabinet that is essentially simple in construction and at the same time is sufliciently strong and rigid to permit the use of relatively light gauge sheet metal in the manufacture of the individual panels which comprise the cabinet. The side panels 10 and 12 are identical and can be selected from a supply of identical stock-pieces. Similarly, the top and bottom, panels are identical and can similarly be selected from a supply of stock parts. The back panel of course is a, single part formed differently from all of the other panels which make up the cabinet assembly. It is believed to be significant, however, that the entire cabinet described thus far is made from only three differently formed panels and that each of these panels is simply constructed so that it can be fashioned quickly by a single stamping and forming operation in a standard press. Further, die costs are maintained at a minimum by the simple design and construction of the panels.

In order to adapt the cabinet for its intended use as a parts bin it is subdivided by a plurality of horizontal shelves 46 and, vertical partitions 48. Any suitable number of shelves 46 may be used and they are spaced according to the exigencies of the particular situation. The shelves 46 here, shown are generally rectangular in form. and they fit snugly within. the confines of the Cabinet and behind the front flanges and 22. Down-turned flanges at the ends of the shelves lie flatly against the side panels 10 and 12 and are spot-welded or otherwise fastened securely'theretoh Downturned flanges 52 at the rear of the shelves 46 are similarly welded to the back panel 16. Upturned flanges .54 at the forward edges of the shelves 46 are Welded to strengthening and reinforcing bars 56 (Fig. 4) which extend between the inturned flanges 20 and 22 and the ends of the bars are butt welded to the inturned flanges 24 and 26.

According to the present invention the bars 56 can be made inexpensively from the same stock used in the cabinet and the shelves. Each of the bars 56 here shown comprises a channel-shaped piece 58 disposed in embracing relation to an elongated strip 60 with the flanges 62 and 64 thereof bent around and crimped securely to the strip. All of the shelves 46 are identically constructed as are the strengthening and reinforcing bars 56 so as to maintain the number of different parts used in the manufacture of the cabinet and consequently the manufacturing costs at a minimum.

Any number of vertical partitions 48 may be used and, as in the case of the shelves 46, the number employed in any particular situation will vary according to the use for which the bin is intended. It is preferred, however, that the shelves 46 be spaced uniformly apart so that all of the partitions 48 are similar in size and shape. When this size-and-space relationship is maintained only one size of partition is required. As a consequence, only one form of partition need be made, and this in turn tends to hold manufacturing die costs and manufacturing costs to a bare minimum. Also, it is a feature of this invention that the shelves 46 are uniquely formed to permit the partitions 48 to be readily removable so that the user can adapt the size of the compartments defined by the shelves and the partitions to the size and shape of the parts to be stored therein.

The particular shape of the partitions 48 and the manner in which the shelves 46 are formed to removably hold the partitions securely in place without weakening the structure or requiring the use of relatively heavy and expensive sheet metal in the construction of the shelves and partitions is a particular feature of the invention.

More particularly, the shelves 46 are formed at uniformly spaced intervals along the width thereof with aligned pairs of slots 66. One slot 66 of each pair is disposed adjacent the forward edge of the shelf and the other slot 66 of each pair i disposed adjacent the rearward edge of the shelf. Each slot is formed at opposite ends respectively with a debossment 68 and an embossment 78, as shown in Fig. 5. The debossment 68 and the embossment 70 are formed from metal at both sides of the slot 66 (Fig. 3) so that the slot in effect extends medianly therethrough. Some stretching of the metal of course occurs when the debossments 68 and embossments 70 are formed, and this metal flows from the edge of the slot 66 so that the embossments and debossments can be formed without appreciable or significant attenuation or weakening of the metal even though the original metal stock from which the shelf is made is essentially thin.

The partitions 48 are simply small, rectangular pieces of sheet metal and they are held in place by the debossments 68 and embossments 70. In each instance, the lower edges of the partitions 48 are retained by the embossments 70 formed in the shelf 46 which supports the partitions, and the upper edges of the partitions are retained by the debossments 68 formed in the shelf 46 immediately thereabove. It is important in this connection that the slots 66 be held to a particular width which will cause the debossment 68 and embossments 70 to fit the partitions 48 relatively snugly so as to hold them securely and to prevent lateral slippage andconsequent inclination or tilting of the partitions; Also, while the debossments 68 and the embossments must be large enough to hold the partitions securely, they must be kept sufliciently small so that the partitions can be snapped" over the debossments and embossments and into the slots 66 which bisect them without appreciable or significant deflection of the partitions. Experience has demonstrated that if this relationship is maintained and the partitions are made essentially flat the bin will carry tremendous weight, even though it is made of very thin and lightweight sheet metal. Also, if this relationship is maintained, the partitions 48 can be repeatedly removed and inserted or adjusted to provide compartments of different sizes without adversely aflecting the strength of the cabinet or it ability to sustain the weight of heavy 3 metal or other parts stored in the cabinet compartments.

In the accomplishment of this result the snug fit and the edgewise engagement of the partitions 48 with the shelves 46 is of utmost significance. If the partitions have horizontal flanges, the entire structure is tremendously weakened and the total weight which the cabinet will support is reduced out of all proportions to what might reasonably be expected. The radius formed at the juncture of the partition and its flange provides a weakness which causes the partition to buckle readily when weight is imposed thereon. Apparently the weight of parts stored in the cabinet imposes a fulcrum action on the radius which tends to roll the flange over and to buckle the partition. However, if the partitions 48 are simply flat pieces of sheet metal which bear edgewise on the shelves 46 they will hold an unexpectedly large weight without buckling, and this in turn permits the entire structure to be made of a lighter gauge metal than would otherwise be possible. It is important, however, in this connection, that it be possible to insert the partitions 48 and to snap them into place without appreciable arching or deflection of the partitions.

The partitions directly below the top 14 and bottom 18 may be made removable and adjustable in the same manner as the other partitions by providing slots and debossments in the top panel and slots and embossments in the bottom panel. However, these slots provide openings through which dirt and the like has access to the interior of the cabinet, and it is preferred therefore that the upper edges of the upper row of partitions 48 and the lower edges of the lower row of partitions 48 be Welded or otherwise permanently secured to the top and bottom panels respectively.

It may thus be seen that I have achieved the objects of my invention. I have provided a lightweight cabinet that is sufliciently strong and rigid to perform its intended function and that can be made inexpensively so as to be readily competitive in a highly competitive market. The entire structure involves a minimum number of different parts, and all of the parts can be formed easily and quickly by a single stamping operation. The dies required to form the part are simple and consequently relatively inexpensive. Some of the parts such as the partitions 48 are simply flat, rectangular pieces of sheet metal which require no forming at all but simply a stamping operation. The manner in which the partitions 48 snap into place and bear edgewise against the shelves and the vertical in-line arrangement of the individual partitions (Fig. 3) distributes the weight of the loaded bin through all of the'partitions. The bearing weight of the loaded shelves is transmitted vertically onto the partitions therebelow and the large number of partitions are capable of sustaining tremendous Weight without buckling or distortion.

Having thus described the invention, I claim:

A lightweight sheet metal cabinet having a plurality of vertically spaced horizontal shelves of thin-gauge sheet metal, each shelf having pairs of laterally spaced slots, the slots in each pair being aligned front to rear of the shelf, a relatively small spherically curved debossment and a relatively small spherically curved embossment being formed in the metal at opposite ends respectively of each of said slots, each of said debossments and each of said embossments being formed from metal at opposite sides of its respective slot so that said slot substantially bisects the opposite portions thereof, and laterally adjustable flat rectangular partitions fitting snugly between and bearing edgeWise against said shelves with the upper edges thereof detachably retained by and in snap-in engagement with the debossments in the shelf immediately thereabove and the lower edges thereof detachably retained by and in snap-in engagement with the embossments in the shelf immediately therebelow, said partitions fitting snugly between the opposite portions of said debossments and of said embossments,

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,375,855 OConnor Apr. 26, 1921 1,748,339 Gerberich Feb. 25, 1930 1,940,048 Cutler Dec. 19, 1933 2,500,309 Dunham Mar. 14, 1950 2,673,390 Broberg Mar. 30, 1954 2,721,632 Surpierre Oct. 25, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1375855 *Oct 22, 1919Apr 26, 1921Lyon Metallic Mfg CompanyShelving
US1748339 *Jan 15, 1927Feb 25, 1930Lyon Metal Products IncShelving
US1940048 *Dec 14, 1932Dec 19, 1933Cutler Clifford AAdjustable holder for partitions
US2500309 *Mar 23, 1946Mar 14, 1950Dunham Thomas MShelf and divider assembly and spring clip anchoring means therefor
US2673390 *Aug 17, 1949Mar 30, 1954Svenska Fiaktfabriken AbMethod for fastening workpieces to metal plates
US2721632 *May 7, 1952Oct 25, 1955Surpierre LeonPartition structure for articles of furniture
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3070234 *Nov 3, 1958Dec 25, 1962Evelyn DeitchmanToy mail classification rack
US5170892 *Feb 24, 1992Dec 15, 1992Fromkin Cyrus JShoe cubbies
US5452811 *Jan 13, 1994Sep 26, 1995Anchor Bay Packaging CorporationStackable partitioned shipping container
US5460277 *Mar 25, 1994Oct 24, 1995Silva; GlennOrganizer rack and system
US5497888 *Nov 16, 1994Mar 12, 1996American Consumer Products, Inc.Modular display system
US8317038 *Nov 5, 2009Nov 27, 2012Henschel-Steinau, Inc.Modular display and dispensing apparatus with plural dispensing tiers
US8814286 *Jun 5, 2012Aug 26, 2014Thermo Fisher Scientific (Asheville) LlcSide access storage rack for cold storage units
US20110100941 *Nov 5, 2009May 5, 2011Henschel-Steinau, Inc.Modular Display and Dispensing Apparatus with Plural Dispensing Tiers
US20130320832 *Jun 5, 2012Dec 5, 2013Thermo Fisher Scientific (Asheville) LlcSide access storage rack for cold storage units
USRE34570 *Jul 9, 1993Mar 29, 1994Fromkin; Cyrus J.Shoe cubbies
EP0935933A1Feb 12, 1999Aug 18, 1999Allit Aktiengesellschaft KunststofftechnikStorage case
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/135, 211/184
International ClassificationA47B47/00, A47B47/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47B47/025
European ClassificationA47B47/02R6