Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2798565 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 9, 1957
Filing dateDec 23, 1954
Priority dateDec 23, 1954
Publication numberUS 2798565 A, US 2798565A, US-A-2798565, US2798565 A, US2798565A
InventorsRosenthal Harry, George E Slaboch
Original AssigneeRosenthal
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Motorized wheel chair steered by driving
US 2798565 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H; ROSENTHAL. ET AL I MOTORIZED WHEEL CHAIR s'rEEREn BY DRIVING I): SheetE-She'qt 1 Filed Dec. 23, 1954 INEN 2,798,565 MOTORIZED WHEEL'QI-XAIR STEERED BY DRIVING Filed D80. 23. 19'54 15957 H. kosEN'rHAL Er AL Sheets-Sheet 2 r V 1 W 1 f?? y 9,1957 -H. ROSENTHAL El AL 2,798,565

" MOTORIZED WHEEL CHAIR sTEEREDpY DRIVING 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Flled Dec 23 1954 United States Patent MOTORIZED WHEEL CHAIR STEERED BY DRIVING Harry Rosenthal and George E. Slaboch, Chicago, 115.; said Slaboch assignor to said Rosenthal Application December 23, 1954, Serial No. 477,273

9 Claims. (Cl. 180-65) This invention relates generally to motorized wheel chairs for invalids and more particularly to improved electric driving apparatus for such chairs.

Electrically driven wheel chairs for use by physically handicapped persons have been known in the prior art, but the motor driving devices for such wheel chairs have been of rather complex construction and of a type not easily installed on a given wheel chair. Furthermore, there is a need to improve the motorized wheelchairs of the prior art to render them more practical so that they are easily operable by partially incapacitated persons by means of a minimum number of simple controls which provide sufiicient regulation for maneuvering in the close quarters frequently encountered as, for example, in the home.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide electric motor driving apparatus for a wheel chair which is of simple and inexpensive construction.

Another object is to provide an improved motor driving attachment for an invalids wheel chair which attachment may be easily installed thereon.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved electrically driven wheel chair which is operable for forward and reverse travel and which may turn within a very small radius.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a highly maneuverable motor driven wheel chair having a minimum number of easily operable controls which are arranged to prevent inadvertent damage to the system if operated improperly.

A feature is the provision of an improved motor driven wheel chair utilizing an electric motor drive for each of two wheels thereof and an energizing circuit for the motors having switches to selectively operate the individual motors in forward and reverse rotation for maneuvering the wheel chair.

Another feature of this invention is the provision of an attachment for a standard wheel chair for converting the same to a motorized chair in which the various parts can be easily attached to the chair without any modification thereof.

A further feature of the invention is the provision of an improved motor driving attachment for a wheel chair including a pair of separately operable electric motors pivotally supported on the frame of a wheel chair, with the motors having drive drums individually engageable and disengageable with a pair of wheels of the wheel chair upon pivotal movement about the shaft.

Still another feature of the invention is the provision of an improved wheel chair having a four position switch device to operate selectively a pair of electric driving motors for complete maneuverability of the chair including forward and reverse travel as well as turning of comparatively wide radius, and turning of very small radius.

Further objects, features and the attending advantages of the invention will be apparent upon consideration of the following description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing in which:

2,7 98,565 Patented July 9, 1957 Fig. l is a perspective view of a wheel chair with the motor driving apparatus of the present invention installed therein;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view of the chair of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a top plan view of a portion of the wheel chair of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a schematic diagram of the wiring circuit used; and

Figs. 5 to 8 illustrate a second embodiment of the invention.

The motor driving apparatus of the present invention includes a pair of reversible electric motors pivotally supported by the frame of a wheel chair. A driven drum associated with each motor is frictionally engageable with the periphery of each of two wheels of the chair. The motors may be pivoted to a position of disengagement with the wheels of the chair should this be desirable. A battery and a control circuit supply power to the motors. A control head with four individual switches included in the control circuit permit selective operation of each of these motors in forward and reverse directions. Therefore, complete maneuverability of the wheel chair is effected by operation of these switches and energization of the motors singly and in combination for travelling forward, backward, turning sharply, or turning less sharply. The motors, battery and frame therefor, and the control head form assemblies which may be easily attached to the frame of a standard wheel chair to convert the same to a motorized chair.

Referring now to the drawings, Figs. 1-3 show an invalids wheel chair which may be of standard construction including a frame 10, a seat 12, a back 14 and foot rests 15. The frame 10 is provided with main driving wheels 16 and 18, one being disposed on either side of the frame, both wheels being rotatably mounted on axles 20. Smaller front wheels 25 are pivotally secured to the frame to provide a balanced structure. Vertical frame members 27 and 28 extend upwardly from lower frame members 22 and 23 and these vertical frame members serve to support the seat 12 and the back 14. Suitable handle grips 30 are secured to the ends of the vertical frame members 28 in order that the wheel chair may be conveniently moved by an attendant. Arm rests 32 are also provided for the seat 12 and are supported by other members of the frame.

The electric motor driving apparatus for propelling the wheel chair thus described includes reversible electric motors 40 and 41 which are mounted upon their respective support brackets 44 and 45. These brackets are pivotally secured to an axle 47 which is mounted. by means of sleeves 48 and 49 respectively disposed upon the lower frame members 22 and 23. The motors 40 and 41 also include gear reduction mechanisms 54 and 55 which operate the driving drums 58 and 59 respec tively. It is also possible to mount the motors separately in pivotal relation on frame members 22 and 23 instead of using axle 47 which extends across the frame. Such a construction is illustrated in Figs. 5, 6, and 7, and is described more in detail hereafter. Such a modification may be desirable in the case of a folding wheel chair so that the motors could remain mounted when the chair is folded.

A pair of clutch levers 62 extend rearward from the support brackets 44 and 45 and it is apparent that by raising the levers 62 and supporting them upon an inner extension 64 of the axle 20 the driving drums 58 and 59 may be supported as shown in Figs. 2 and 3. However, the levers 62 may be removed from their support upon the inward projections 64 by bending them slightly inward to bring the drums 58 and 59 into contact with the peripheries of the driving wheels 16 and 18. Tension springs extending between the levers 62 and the respective'lower frame members 22 and 23 serve to maintain the driving drums in contact with the driving wheels as shown by the dotted line portion of the drawing of Fig. 2. Therefore, a simple clutch mechanism has been provided in order to place the motors in an operative position or to disengage them which may be desirable, for example, when an attendant is to push the wheel chair.

The reversible electric motors 40 and 41 are energized by means of the storage battery 75 supported on brackets 76, the power from which battery is applied to the motors by means of cable 77 connected to the battery and the motors and circuit elements contained in the control head or box 80 disposed adjacent an arm rest. In the illustrated form of the control box it is possible to propel the wheel chair in a forward direction by manipulation of push-type switches 81 and 82 while the chair may be moved backwards by manipulation of push-type switches 83 and 84. These operations drive the electric motors 4 and 4-1 respectively in what may be termed forward and reverse rotation. If it is desired to turn the wheel chair in a small space, switches 82 and 84 may be operated in order to drive the motor 41 in a forward direction and the motor in a backward direction thus rotating the chair about an axis midway between the driving wheels 16 and 18. Similarly, a sharp turn to the left may be effected by operating switches 81 and 83 in which case the motor 40 is driven in a forward direction and motor 41 is driven in a backward direction thereby turning the wheel chair to the left. It is apparent that by such maneuvering the entire chair may be turned in a minimum of space which, as has been pointed out, is frequently desirable in the crowded conditions often found in such places as the home.

It is also possible, of course, to turn the chair in a wider radius by operating only one of the switches in which case the chair would pivot, about one of the driving wheels while being driven by the other driving wheel. That is, by operation of switch 81 alone, motor 40 will be energized to drive wheel 16 forward with wheel 18 remaining stationary, or by operating switch 82 motor 41 will be energized to drive wheel 18 in a forward direction while wheel 16 remains stationary. Thus, by manipulation of the switch buttons, complete maneuverability is possible and forward and reverse motion is available in addition to a choice of turn radii.

The control circuit for energizing the motors 40 and 41 is shown in Fig. 4-. Thestorage battery 75 is coupled to a fuse 90 and on-off switch 91 to stationary contacts 9497 associated respectively with switches 84, 81, 82 and 83. In the unoperated positions of these switches the stationary contacts 94 and 95 are coupled together through a rheostat 100 and the contacts 96 and 97 are coupled together through a rheostat 101. The stationary contacts 104107 are engaged in the operated positions of the respective switches 84, 81, 82 and 83. The reversible motor 40 has a pair of terminals coupled across the contacts 104 and 105 and the motor 41 has a pair of connections coupled across the contacts 106 and 107. The return connectionis made from each motor to the battery 75 and the motors are constructed so that energization of the motors through contacts 104 and 107 drives each in a reverse direction and energization of them through contacts 105 and 106 drives each of them in a forward direction.

It is apparent that by operation of switch 84, power will be supplied to reversible motor 40 through rheostat 100 and stationary contact 95 thereby driving this motor in a reverse direction. Similarly, operation of switch 81 Supplies power to the motor 40 to stationary contact 105, rheostat 100 and stationary contact 94 thus driving the motor in a forward direction. In a corresponding manner, operation of switch 83 drives motor 41 in a reverse direction and operation of switch 82 drives this motor in a forward direction. Main switch 91 may be disposed in any convenient position (not shown) on COIItIQl b0 80. The rheostats and 101 are utilized to balance the system in order that both motors will drive the chair with equal torque so that when both forward buttons or both reverse buttons are operated, the wheel chair will travel in a straight line. The rheostats 100 and 101 may also be used to adjust the speed of the chair in forward and reverse directions. Alternatively, a separate rheostat 102 may be provided in the common lead from battery 75 to the motors 40 and 41 to simultaneously control the speed of both motors. When the rheostat 102 is used for speed control, rheostats 100 and 101 could be quite small for balancing and when once set would not need to be changed.

In Figs. 5 to 8 inclusive, there is shown a second embodiment of the invention wherein the motorized unit is applied to a Wheel chair of the folding type. In such a chair, side frame 110 and 111 have main driving wheels 112 and pivotal front wheels 113 secured thereto. The two side frames are interconnected for collapsing movement with respect to each other by a cross bar pivoting arrangement formed by main members 115, 116, 117 and 118. These members, in addition to connecting the side frames, support the seat 120. The cross bars are connected to the side frames at the bottom thereof, and also by arms 121, 122, 123 and a fourth arm not shown. A comparison of Figs. 6 and 7 illustrates the manner in which the chair folds, but it is to be pointed out that this is a standard construction and is shown only to illustrate the application of the invention.

In the embodiment of Figs. 5 to 8 each of the motors 125 is mounted on a supporting plate 126 pivotally connected at 127 to the member 128 of the side frame. The plate 126 is pivoted so that the driving drum 129 connected to motor 125 through speed reducing gears may be selectively held in engagement with the wheel 112. Spring 130 connected between the plate 126 and a bracket secured to the same bolt as arm 122 holds the driving drum 129 normally in engagement with the wheel 112. A control arm 131 extending upwardly from the plate 126 operates in a bracket 132 to hold the motor 125 in a position so that the driving drum 129 is clear of the wheel 112. This is illustrated in Fig. 8 which is a fragmentary top view showing the bracket 132 and the arm 131. The arm 131 is shown held in the notch 132' so that the drum is out of engagement, but may be released from the notch so that the spring 130 holds the drum in driving position.

It is to be noted that the pivot 127 and the bracket 132 may be parts of a standard wheel chair, being normally used for a brake therefor. Accordingly, the brake may be removed and the motor mounting plate installed without making any other changes on the frame. The brake is, of course, not required when a motor is used, since the speed reducing gears of the motor prevents rotation of the driving drum by the wheel so that driving mechanism forms a brake.

The position of the control arms 131 is such that a person in the chair may be able to operate the same to engage and disengage the motor. This provides an advantage over the structure shown in Figs. 1 to 3 wherein the motor control levels are inaccessible to a person in the chair.

The control mechanism for the system of Figs. 5 to 8 may be generally the same as in that of Figs. 1 to 3. The control box 135 in addition to including the push button switches 136 at the top, which directly control the operation may also include one or more rheostats 137. The control circuit of Fig. 4 may be used, with the push buttons 136 operating in the same manner as the push buttons 81-84 of the first embodiment. The rheostats 137 may be used in the control system as shown in Fig. 4, being the rheostats 100 and 101, also, if a single rheostat 102 is used for speed control, this rheostat may be providedon the box 135 f0r access by the person in the chair. In such case, the rheostats 100 and 101 can be provided inside the control box and need not be directly accessible.

To permit folding of the chair, a removable battery plate 140 is provided. This plate provides a flat support on which the battery rests, with curved end portions 141 and 142 which fit over the bottom portion of the side frames at the rear thereof. A bail 143 may also be provided to permit easy removal of the battery. Projection 145 may be provided at the back of the chair frames so that the battery plate will not slide off the chair.

It will be noted that the position of the motors on the side frame is such that the chair can be telescoped almost to the same extent as when the motor driving device is not provided thereon. This permits the chair to be folded for transportation, storage and the like. The motor driving device does not add substantial weight except for the battery and this may be handled separately.

It is obvious, of course, that other mounting positions may be used for the control boxes 80 and 135 in order that the switches may be operated by a foot or ditferent hand of the individual and that convenient lever devices may be provided for operation of these switches in any given case.

The invention provides, therefore, motor driving apparatus for a wheel chair which provides great maneuverability of the chair, including travel in any desired direction in addition to turning of the chair in the smallest possible radius. The apparatus may be provided initially as an integral part of the chair or may be installed as an attachment at a later time. The simplicity of attachment necessitates only a support for the battery, attachment of the control box, attachment of springs, and attachment of the motor support. All these attachments may be provided without modification of stand ard chairs as has been described. Accordingly, the invention comprises a highly satisfactory motor driving attachment for an invalids wheel chair which is easily installed and of simple and inexpensive construction.

We claim:

1. A motor propelling device for an invalids chair of the type having a frame structure for supporting a person and a plurality of wheels at least two of which are disposed on opposite sides of the frame to constitute driving wheels, said device including in combination, a pair of reversible electric motor means individually associated with the driving wheels and each having an associated drive drum rotatable thereby, first and second support means each including pivotal means for mounting the same on the opposite sides of the frame structure adjacent the driving wheels, with said support means being at least partially within the space defined by the frame structure, said pair of motor means being individually mounted on said support means with the drive drum of each motor means in a common plane with the associated driving wheel, first and second manually operated control means individually associated with said support means to provide pivotal movement of said support means, said drive drums individually engaging said driving wheels upon operation of said control means to provide pivotal movement of the associated support means to a first position and being disengaged from the same upon operation of said control means to provide pivotal movement of the associated support means to a second position, said con trol means including spring means for biasing said support means in said first position, said control means including means operative to hold said support means in said second position, and a power supply circuit coupled to said motor means, said power supply circuit including a plurality of switch devices for individually energizing said pair of motor means to rotate the respective drive drums selectively in forward and reverse directions, so that the invalids chair may be driven in a chosen direction by the rotation of said drive drums in the same rotational directions respectively and may be turned by non-uniform rotation of said drive drums.

2. Electrical driving apparatus for an invalids chair of the folding type having a frame structure with a pair of spaced parallel side sections connected for 'movement toward each other and each supporting a comparatively large driving wheel, the frame further including pivotally supported front wheels and a chair portion for a user, the electrical driving apparatus for such a chair including in combination, first and second support means each including pivotal means for mounting the same on the side sections of the frame structure adjacent the drive wheels and at least partially within the space defined by the side sections, a pair of reversible electric motor means individually mounted on said support means and each having a drive drum rotatably driven thereby and lying in a common plane with the associated driving wheel, each of said support means including control means for controlling the position of said support means about said pivotal means, said control means each moving the corresponding support means to a first position in which said drive drum of a motor means supported thereon engages the associated driving wheel for rotating the same upon energization of the associated motor means, said control means each moving the corresponding support means to a second position in which said drive drum of the motor means supported thereon is disengaged from the associated driving wheel for manual propulsion of the chair, battery supportingmeans removably positioned on the frame structure, and a power supply circuit for connecting said pair of motor means to a battery on said supporting means, said power supply circuit including switch means for individually energizing each of said motor means to & rotate the respective drive drums selectively in forward and reverse directions, so that the invalids chair may be driven in forward and reverse directions by the rotation of said drums in the same directions respectively and may be turned by non-uniform rotation of said drums.

3. A motorized propelling device for attachment to a wheel chair of the type having a frame structure for supporting a person, and which includes a pair of driving wheels mounted independently of one another on opposite sides of the frame structure, said device including in combination, a pair of reversible electric motor means individually associated with the driving wheels and each having a drive drum rotatable thereby and lying in a common plane with the corresponding driving wheel, a

pair of support means one being on each side of the frame structure adjacent the driving wheel on such side, each of said support means mounting one of said motor means thereon, means pivotally connecting said support means on the frame structure at least partially within the space defined by the frame structure, each of said support means including control means for controlling the position of said support means about its pivotal connection to said frame, whereby each of said drive drums engages independently the associated driving wheel upon movement of said support means to a first position and disengages the same upon movement of said support means to a second position for manual propulsion of the chair, a battery, carrying means for said battery carried by the frame structure, and a power supply circuit for coupling said pair of motor means to said battery, said power supply circuit including switch means for supplying power to each of said motor means independently to cause rotation of the respective drive drums in forward and reverse directions, whereby the wheel chair may be driven in a straight line by the rotation of said drive drums in the same rotational directions respectively and may be turned by selective rotation of said drive drums.

4. A motorized propelling device in accordance with claim 3 wherein each of said control means includes a spring connected to the associated support means for holding the same in the first position with the drive drum of the motor means mounted on said support means being held in frictional engagementrwith the associated driving wheel. 7 Y i 5. A' motorized propelling device in accordance with claim 3 wherein each of said control means includes spring means connected to the associated support means for holding the same in the first position so that the drive drum of the motor means mounted on said support means frictionally engages the associated driving wheel, each control means also including lever means for holding the associated support means in said second position so that the drive drum is disengaged from the associated driving wheel.

6. A motorized propelling device in accordance with claim 3 wherein each of said motor means includes a first terminal energization of which causes rotation of the drive drum thereof in a first direction and a second terminal energization of which rotates the drive drum thereof in a reverse direction, and wherein said switch means includes a pair of first switches individually coupled to said first terminals of said motor means and a pair of second switches individually coupled to said second terminals of said motor means, whereby simultaneous action of said switches of said first pair energizes said motor means to cause movement of said chair in a forward direction, simultaneous operation of said switches of said second pair causes operation of said chair in a reverse direction, and individual operaton of said switches causes operation of said motor means to turn the chair.

7. A motorized propelling device in accordance with claim 3 wherein each of said motor means includes a first terminal energization of which causes rotation of the drive drum thereof in a first direction and a second terminal energization of which drives the drive drum thereof in a reverse direction, wherein said switch means includes a pair of first switches individually coupled to said first terminals of said motor means and a pair of second switches individually coupled to said second terminals of said motor means, and including circuit means interconnecting said switches and said motor means including variable resistor means, with said first and second switches coupled to each of said motor means being mutually interconnected through said resistor means so that said resistor means controls the amount of power furnished to each motor means and only one of said terminals of each motor means may be energized at a particular time.

8. A motorized propelling device for attachment to a wheel chair of the type having a frame structure for supporting a person, and which includes right and left driving wheels mounted independently of one another on opposite sides of the frame structure, said device including in combination, a pair of reversible electric motor means individually associated with the driving wheels and each having a drive drum rotatable thereby and lying in a common plane with the corresponding driving wheel, a pair of support means one being on each side of the frame structure adjacent the driving wheel on such side, each of said support means mounting one of said motor means thereon, means pivotally connecting said support means on the frame structure at least partially within the space defined by the frame structure, each of said support means including control means for controlling the position of said support means about its pivotal connection to said frame, whereby each of said drive drums engages independently the associated driving wheel upon movement of said support means to a first position and diseugages the same upon movement of said support means to a second position for manual propulsion of the chair, a battery, carrying means for said battery carried by the frame structure, and power supply means for coupling said pair of motor means to said battery, said power supply means including a control box having first and second switches for each of said motor means, each of said first switches energizing the associated motor means for forward rotation and each of said second switches energizing the same for reverse rotation, said control box including supporting means for said switches with said first switches positioned forwardly thereon and said second switches positioned rearwardly thereon, said first switch associated with said right driving wheel being positioned to the left of said first switch associated with said left driving wheel and said second switch associated with the right driving wheel being positioned to the right of said second switch associated with the left driving wheel, so that simultaneous operation of the pair of said switch means in the forward positions and of the pair of switch means in the rearward positions energizes said motor means to rotate the same in the same rotational directions for forward and backward movement of the chair respectively, and simultaneous operation of said switches on the right and simultaneous operation of the switches on the left energizes said motor means for operation in different rotational directions to turn the wheel chair to the right and the left respectively.

9. A motorized propelling device for attachment to a wheel chair of the folding type having a frame structure for supporting a person with first and second sides formed of frame members and connected for movement toward each other to permit folding the chair, and which includes a pair of driving wheels mounted independently of one another on opposite sides of the frame structure, said device including in combination, a pair of reversible electric motor means individually associated with the driving wheels and each having a drive drum rotatable thereby and lying in a common plane with the corresponding driving wheel, a pair of support means one being on each side of the frame structure adjacent the driving wheel on such side, each of said support means mounting one of said motor means thereon, means pivotally connecting said support means on the frame structure at least partially within the space defined by the frame members on the sides of the chair, each of said support means including control means for controlling the position of said support means about its pivotal connection to said frame, whereby each of said drive drums engages individually the associated driving wheel upon operation of the associated control means to move the corresponding support means to a first position and disengages the same upon operation of the control means to move the corresponding support means to a second position for manual propulsion of the chair, a battery, carrying means for said battery removably carried by said frame structure, and a power supply circuit for coupling said pair of motor means to said battery, said power supply circuit including switch means for sup-- plying power to each of said motor means independently to cause rotation of the respective drive drums in forward and reverse directions, whereby the wheel chair may be driven in a straight line by the rotation. of said drive drums in the same rotational directions respectively and may be turned by the selected rotation of said drive drums.

eferences Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,391,529 Crochat Sept. 20, 1921 2,054,6 Wulfert Sept. 15, 1936 2,181,420 Everest et a1 Nov. 28, 1939 2,254,331 Stuebing Sept. 2, 1941 2,495,573 -Duke Jan. 24, 1950 2,544,831 Guyton Mar. 13, 1951 2,578,886 Isherwood et al. Dec. 18, 1951 2,649,309 Deissner Aug. 18, 1953 2,751,027 McLaughlin June 19, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1391529 *Aug 17, 1916Sep 20, 1921Henry CrochatElectrical driving
US2054644 *Mar 5, 1934Sep 15, 1936Wagner Electric CorpMotor drive for toy trucks or the like
US2181420 *Oct 8, 1937Nov 28, 1939Herbert A EverestFolding propulsion wheel chair
US2254331 *Feb 19, 1941Sep 2, 1941Stuebing Jr WilliamLift truck
US2495573 *Oct 13, 1948Jan 24, 1950Duke SamuelMotor attachment for wheel chairs
US2544831 *Sep 3, 1948Mar 13, 1951Arthur C GuytonElectrically propelled wheel chair
US2578886 *Sep 22, 1948Dec 18, 1951Buzz Boy Motor Bike CoMotor adapter
US2649309 *Jun 8, 1951Aug 18, 1953Deissner Douglas DFoldable wheel chair and steerable wheel attachment therefor
US2751027 *May 19, 1952Jun 19, 1956Robert B MclaughlinEndless track supported invalid chair
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2931449 *Nov 12, 1958Apr 5, 1960Kentucky Res FoundationOccupant-controlled, self-propelled, obstruction-climbing vehicle
US2937694 *Sep 19, 1958May 24, 1960Sneed Arthur LTray assembly for attachment to a wheelchair
US2978053 *Oct 21, 1957Apr 4, 1961Arthur O SchmidtDriving and steering apparatus for wheel chairs
US3037570 *Apr 26, 1961Jun 5, 1962Harold Olson JohnPowered vehicle controlled by harvesting worker
US3040828 *Jul 23, 1959Jun 26, 1962Yale & Towne Mfg CoController for industrial truck
US3064744 *Jul 11, 1960Nov 20, 1962Everest & JenningsSelf-propelled wheel chair
US3081883 *Aug 3, 1960Mar 19, 1963Manning Maxwell & Moore IncSteerable gantry crane
US3094713 *Nov 19, 1959Jun 25, 1963Charles W WiseInvalid's bed
US3100547 *Jun 30, 1960Aug 13, 1963Rosenthal HarryElectric driving apparatus for a wheel chair
US3100860 *Oct 9, 1958Aug 13, 1963Rosenthal HarryMotor drive control for wheelchair
US3107090 *Feb 2, 1961Oct 15, 1963Burroughs CorpSheet drive and registering apparatus
US3111181 *Jul 5, 1961Nov 19, 1963George D YatichPowered wheelchair
US3111331 *Mar 5, 1962Nov 19, 1963Burton H LockeStair-climbing wheel chair
US3112001 *Sep 4, 1962Nov 26, 1963Charles W WiseDrive means for an invalid's bed
US3123167 *Aug 12, 1960Mar 3, 1964 D lichti
US3137869 *May 18, 1962Jun 23, 1964Lenard W JohnsonWheel chair with power lift means
US3142351 *Jan 19, 1962Jul 28, 1964Canadian ResStair climbing wheelchair
US3167146 *May 8, 1963Jan 26, 1965Rome R RudolphPower driven golf cart
US3196970 *May 17, 1963Jul 27, 1965Dale E BrennerStair-climbing wheel chair
US3265147 *Feb 18, 1965Aug 9, 1966Coordes John EAuxiliary wheel drive mechanism
US3269768 *Sep 14, 1964Aug 30, 1966John C KinneyInvalid's chair
US3279722 *Aug 7, 1964Oct 18, 1966Nat Can Retinning CoAircraft moving device
US3351148 *Oct 24, 1965Nov 7, 1967Shawn M SolomonSelf-operable detachable power unit attachment for wheel chairs and power control unit therefor
US3565204 *Jan 17, 1969Feb 23, 1971Chicago Stainless EquipmentCollapsible cart
US3575250 *Dec 23, 1968Apr 20, 1971Battery Power Unit Co IncSelf-propelled electric vehicle and battery mount
US3580591 *Dec 24, 1968May 25, 1971Lovelace Foundation For MedicaWheelchair attachment
US3613813 *May 16, 1969Oct 19, 1971Raymond G BiddleWheelchairs
US3770073 *Mar 30, 1971Nov 6, 1973W MeyerFoldable invalid chair
US3786597 *Jul 21, 1972Jan 22, 1974Tomy Kogyo CoAmusement device
US3786887 *Mar 20, 1972Jan 22, 1974B RosenthalMotorized wheel chair drive
US3802524 *Jun 5, 1972Apr 9, 1974W SeidelMotorized invalid carrier
US3826324 *Oct 26, 1972Jul 30, 1974D StevensTrailer mover
US3837028 *Sep 22, 1972Sep 24, 1974Dixon & Co Ltd R DFloor treating machines
US3893529 *Apr 22, 1974Jul 8, 1975Jr Andrew KarchakWheelchair drive package
US3896891 *Aug 31, 1973Jul 29, 1975Stainless Medical Products IncModular motorized wheel chair
US3901337 *Nov 22, 1972Aug 26, 1975Spastics SocWheel chairs
US3945449 *Jan 31, 1975Mar 23, 1976Ostrow Henry JWheeled attachment for a chair
US3965402 *Jul 1, 1974Jun 22, 1976The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyHeadrest proportional control for motorized wheelchair
US4037676 *Jul 24, 1975Jul 26, 1977Edward Thipthorp RusePowered invalid-chairs
US4125169 *Jun 9, 1977Nov 14, 1978National Research Development CorporationWheelchairs
US4352406 *Aug 4, 1980Oct 5, 1982Anthony FahrenschonSelectively engageable and disengageable drive for wheeled devices such as grain augers or the like
US4407543 *Oct 30, 1981Oct 4, 1983David MashudaMechanized wheelchair
US4503724 *Feb 24, 1982Mar 12, 1985Ward Russell GPower transmission unit with oscillating drive and driven members
US4527648 *Sep 16, 1983Jul 9, 1985Sines Thomas EBattery-powered wheeled vehicle
US4652026 *Sep 24, 1985Mar 24, 1987Byrge Jerome JManual propulsion apparatus for wheelchairs
US4705449 *Mar 30, 1987Nov 10, 1987Christianson Leslie LSkid-steer vehicle
US4823900 *Jun 9, 1988Apr 25, 1989Jeffrey FarnamFour-wheel drive wheel-chair with compound wheels
US4875535 *Oct 1, 1987Oct 24, 1989Autokraft LimitedVehicle drive
US4926952 *Mar 30, 1989May 22, 1990Jeffrey FarnamFour-wheel drive wheelchair with compound wheels
US4949408 *Sep 29, 1989Aug 21, 1990Trkla Theodore AAll purpose wheelchair
US4961473 *Jan 30, 1989Oct 9, 1990Jones George CKit for converting a hand-powered wheelchair to an electric motor-power wheelchair
US4989890 *Dec 14, 1988Feb 5, 1991Invacare CorporationLength and width adjustable wheelchair
US5020621 *Dec 19, 1989Jun 4, 1991Martin Christopher VElectric motor powered skateboard with integral brakes
US5197559 *Sep 4, 1990Mar 30, 1993Fortress Life-Style, Inc.Foldable wheelchair with optional power or manual drive
US5222567 *Apr 26, 1991Jun 29, 1993Genus Inc.Power assist device for a wheelchair
US5258912 *Jun 24, 1991Nov 2, 1993General Motors CorporationWheel understeer speed control
US5305218 *Nov 2, 1992Apr 19, 1994General Motors CorporationVehicle handling control for wheel slip control systems
US5542690 *Dec 16, 1994Aug 6, 1996Forth Research, Inc.Wheelchair for controlled environments
US5829542 *Jun 15, 1995Nov 3, 1998Fichtel & Sachs AgMotor vehicle having drive assemblies with various track distances
US5873425 *Jun 25, 1997Feb 23, 1999Yang; Chih-HuangMotorized stroller with rear wheel drive assembly
US5937961 *Jun 12, 1996Aug 17, 1999Davidson; WayneStroller including a motorized wheel assembly
US5938282 *Jun 18, 1997Aug 17, 1999Agco Gmbh & Co.Control device for vehicles
US6481525 *Jun 22, 1999Nov 19, 2002Sauer-Danfoss (Nordborg) A/SSteering arrangement for a vehicle
US6491122May 1, 2001Dec 10, 2002Pride Mobility Products CorporationVariable-speed control for vehicle
US7581604 *Mar 8, 2007Sep 1, 2009Kanto Auo Works, Ltd.Motorized wheelchair
US7624826 *Jun 1, 2006Dec 1, 2009Zhao TianyunPortable power-saving and foldable electric wheel chair
US8602138 *Feb 25, 2011Dec 10, 2013Paul FilkoskiMotorized anti-tipper device
US20070040349 *Jun 1, 2006Feb 22, 2007Zhao TianyunPortable Power-Saving and Foldable Electric Wheel Chair
US20070261897 *Mar 8, 2007Nov 15, 2007Kanto Auto Works, Ltd.Motorized wheelchair
US20110214929 *Feb 25, 2011Sep 8, 2011Paul FilkoskiMotorized Anti-Tipper Device
DE4421425C1 *Jun 18, 1994Aug 10, 1995Fichtel & Sachs AgDual electric motorised drive with gearing for road vehicle
WO1992004200A1 *Sep 4, 1991Mar 19, 1992Fortress Lite-Style, Inc.Foldable wheelchair with optional power or manual drive
Classifications
U.S. Classification180/6.5, 180/315, 180/298, 180/907, 318/55, 280/DIG.100, 280/250.1, 280/11, 180/342, 297/DIG.400, 280/42, 180/69.6, 180/65.1, 180/68.5
International ClassificationA61G5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61G5/045, A61G2005/0825, A61G2203/14, A61G2005/1054, Y10S297/04, Y10S280/10, Y10S180/907
European ClassificationA61G5/04A6