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Publication numberUS2798973 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 9, 1957
Filing dateAug 27, 1953
Priority dateAug 27, 1953
Publication numberUS 2798973 A, US 2798973A, US-A-2798973, US2798973 A, US2798973A
InventorsDoyle Dewey I
Original AssigneeDoyle Vacuum Cleaner Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum cleaner motor shroud
US 2798973 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 9, 1957 o. 1. DOYLE VACUUM CLEANER MOTOR SHROUD Filed Aug. 27,1955

I INVENTOR.

DEWEY DOYLE "f 2,798,973 Patented July 9, 195'? and yet which has sufficient area to enable enough sound deadening material to be applied thereto so that an effec- 2 798 973 tive reduction in motor noise will result.

VACUUM CLEANER MOTOR SHROUD Dewey I. Doyle, Grand Rapids, Mich, assignor to Doyle Vacuum Cleaner Company, Grand Rapids, Mich, a corporation of Michigan Application August 27, 1953, Serial No. 376,841

8 Claims. (Cl. 310-60) This invention relates in general to improvements in vacuum cleaners particularly of the tank type and is especially directed to improved details of a motor shroud assembly adapted to conceal the motor housing which drives the fan wheel.

In tank type vacuum cleaners the motor for driving the fan wheel is customarily mounted at one end of the tank. If the tank is positioned vertically, then the motor and motor shaft are usually vertically positioned on the top end of the tank. The motor is usually mountedin axial alignment with the tank itself whether the tank is upright or horizontal. It is also customary to provide an arrangement whereby the motor may be air cooled.

Heretofore the motor shrouds which are utilized to enclose the motor and its housing have had the disadvantage that when openings were provided therein for the passage of the cooling air, it was also possible that water might reach the motor from the outside. Furthermore, no serious thought was given to designing these motor shrouds in such a way as to enhance the appearance thereof. The motor shroud assembly embodying the present invention is designed to present not only a pleasing appearance and to blend smoothly with the appearance of the remainder of the vacuum cleaner structure, but also has other advantages which will appear more fully hereinafter.

Anotherdisadvantage of tank type vacuum cleaners, particularly where the motor is mounted on the top end thereof, has been that the motor creates noise and the shroud assemblies enclosing the motor and its housing have not been adapted for the application of sound deadening materials to reduce the noise thereof such as is possible in the present construction.

It is, therefore, one of the principal objects of the present invention to provide a motor shroud assembly for a tank type vacuum cleaner wherein a plurality of parts when assembled together to enclose the motor and its housing will produce a smooth streamlined and pleasing appearance.

Another object of the invention is to provide a motor shroud for the motor of a tank type vacuum cleaner wherein motor cooling air inlet and outlet ports provide adequate air for the cooling of the motor and yet are so arranged as to prevent water from reaching the motor.

A further object of the invention is to provide a motor shroud for the motor of a tank type vacuum cleaner wherein inner and outer sections overlap in spaced relation to permit egress of air and to prevent ingress of water and yet are so shaped as to blend with each other to present a smooth and pleasing appearance.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a motor shroud assembly which is particularly adapted for the use of sound deadening material, thus affording a quieter running machine.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a motor shroud assembly which is easy to assemble and disassemble in order that the motor may be easily reached A still further and more specific object of the invention is to provide a motor shroud wherein one form thereof contemplates two annular sections surrounding the motor and held in spaced relation by an apertured ring, and a third section in the form of a cap, thereby to provide air passages, and wherein all of the sections cooperate to produce a pleasing streamlined appearance.

A still further and more specific object of the invention is to provide a motor shroud wherein only two annular sections are used and which are held in properly spaced relation by suitable means which permits the egress of cooling air and prevents the ingress of water to the motor.

' Another object is to provide a motor shroud assembly embodying a still different form wherein a plurality of superimposed annular sections surround the motor and wherein each section is held in spaced relation to the next adjacent section to permit adequate cooling air for the motor to pass therebetween.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent upon reading the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a tank type vacuum cleaner embodying the present invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical sectional view of the upper part of the vacuum cleaner taken along the plane of line 22 of Fig. 1 and illustrating a preferred form of motor shroud assembly embodying the features of the present invention;

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view similar to Fig. 2 but illustrating the use of sound deadening material therein;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view through the shroud assembly showing a modified form of the invention;

Fig. 5 is a horizontal sectional view taken along the plane of line 5-5 of Fig. 4, and

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 4 but showing a still further modified form of the invention.

Referring now more particularly to the drawing and especially to Figs. 1 and 2, the tank type vacuum cleaner to which the present invention is particularly applicable embodies a tank 1 provided with an inlet opening 2 for the passage of air into the tank from the atmosphere, which air movement is created by the fan wheel located within the machine. If desired, the tank may be made mobile by the provision of suitable means such as the casters 3 adjacent the bottom thereof.

The top part of the tank body includes a head assembly generally indicated by the numeral 4 and which is adapted to be secured to the top part of the tank by clamping means 5 suitably positioned on a clamping ring 6. The head assembly may have associated therewith an outlet port 7 for the air after it passes through the tank. Some forms of machines may provide a filter bag on the inside of the tank and others may provide such filter bag on the outside of the tank. Such filter bags filter the dirt prior to exhausting the air to the atmosphere but as far as the present invention is concerned it is immaterial whether it is of the concealed or exposed filter bag type.

The motor shroud assembly is indicated generally by the numeral 8 and is positioned on the top of the head assembly 4. The motor shroud is designed to enclose the motor of the vacuum cleaner which is customarily provided with a housing 9 (Fig. 2). The motor is positioned so that its shaft is vertical and the lower endof the shaft has mounted thereon a fan wheel (not shown) disposed within a fan wheel housing 10. The details of this structure do not form any part of the present invention but are illustrated in greater detail in my earlier filed copending application Serial No. 342,521, filed March 16, 1953.

The motor is preferably inverted from the usual manner of mounting so that the brushes are at the lower end thereof. These brushes are mounted within suitable positioning or guide means 11 and the details of this motor and its mounting are more clearly illustrated in my earlier filed copending application Serial No. 344,135, filed March 23, 1953.

The motor housing 9 is provided with a plurality of air inlet ports 12 at the lower end thereof and has a cap 13 covering its upper end which cap also is provided with a plurality of air outlet ports 14.

The motor shaft is also provided with a cooling fan wheel adapted to draw air inwardly from the atmosphere and to direct such air through the motor for cooling purposes. As far as the present invention is concerned, it is immaterial on which end of the motor shaft this smaller fan wheel is mounted although as may be seen in my above referred to copending application Serial No. 344,135 this cooling fan wheel is illustrated as mounted at the upper end of the motor shaft. The cooling air is thus drawn inwardly through the inlet ports 12 and is exhausted through the ports 14 after performing its cooling function.

The motor shroud assembly of the present invention is mounted on a plurality of spaced members 15 which are of such height as to position properly the shroud assembly in spaced relation with the head assembly 4, thereby providing an annular space 16 interrupted only by the spacers 15 for the passage of air therethrough from the atmosphere to the ports 12 in the motor housing 9.

In the form of the invention shown in Figs. 1 and 2 the motor shroud assembly includes a lower annular member 17 which extends generally upwardly and inwardly. The upper part of the member 17 curves inwardly as at 18 and terminates in an upwardly extending annular flange 19. The lower part of the member -17 is curved outwardly as at 20 to form a substantially flat portion which terminates in a downwardly extending flange 21. A plurality of fastening means such as the bolts 22 are adapted to secure this bottom section 17 to the spacers 15 and the flange 21 is of such height as to permit adequate cooling air to enter through the annular space 16.

An apertured ring member 23 having a plurality of ports 24 therein is positioned immediately above and is secured to the bottom section 17. This ring 23 also acts as a spacing support for the various sections of the shroud assembly in the manner illustrated in Fig. 2. The lower part of the ring 23 is formed as a downwardly extending flange 25. Above this flange 25 the ring extends inwardly and upwardly as at 26 and then again inwardly to provide an annular shelf 27. The ring then terminates in an upwardly extending annular flange 28. The upper outermost edge of the ring 23 is formed to provide an annular shelf 29 and the entire ring is mounted on the bottom section 17 and is secured to the annular flange 19 thereon by means of the screws 30.

An intermediate section of the shroud assembly is illustrated at 31 which is also annular and surrounds the upper portion of the motor housing 9. The intermediate section 31 rests at its lower edge on the shelf 27 of the ring 23 and the upper part thereof is adapted to be pressed against an annular resilient sealing ring 32. This intermediate section is then secured to the upstanding flange 28 of the spacer ring 23 by means of the screws 33.

The upper part of the shroud assembly consists of a cap member 34 which is formed with downwardly extending sides 35 which also slope outwardly slightly in 'a manner to blend smoothly with the sloping portions of the bottom section 17. The lower edge of the cap 34 rests upon the shelf 29 of the spacer ring 23 and is secured to the spacer ring by means of screws 36.

It will thus be clear that the space betwen the intermediate section 31 and the sides 35 of the cap 34 will provide an annular passage 37 through which cooling air may pass.

When the motor is in operation and the motor cooling fan wheel functions to draw cooling air inwardly from the atmosphere through the annular space 16, it will draw this air inwardly through the inlet ports 12 where the air will contact the necessary parts of the motor and perform its cooling function. This air is then caused to pass upwardly and outwardly through the outlet openings 14 at the upper end of the motor housing and will then be forced downwardly through the annular passage 37 and outwardly through the outlet ports 24 in the spacer ring 23. It will thus be seen that adequate cooling air may be drawn inwardly and exhausted through the ports 24 and yet the nature of the structure is such that it will effectively prevent water from the outside reaching the motor. In order for water to reach the motor it would have to be forced inwardly through the ports 24 and upwardly through the annular passage 37. Such a possibility is extremely remote so that the structure of the present invention may be said to permit the I egress of cooling air and prevent the ingress of water to the motor.

Referring now to Fig. 3, there is illustrated the same structure just described with reference to Fig. 2 except that this form of the invention illustrates the use of a suitable sound deadening material in order to absorb m0- tor noise.

In this form of the invention the same parts of the shroud assembly are used which include the bottom section 17, the spacer ring 23, the intermediate section 31, and the cap member 34. With this arrangement it is possible to line the cap 34 with suitable sound deadening material, as indicated at 38. This material obviously may be any material capable of absorbing sound and reduc' ing motor noise, such as felt, cork and the like.

It will be obvious that if it is desired such a sound deadening material may also be placed over the intermediate section 31 so that both sides of the passage 37 may be covered with this material and thus even more effectively reduce motor noise and cause the machine to run more quietly in areas where this effect is desired.

I Figs. 4 and 5 illustrate a modified form of the invention wherein the shroud assembly is made up of only two sections together with a, suitable spacer member between.

the two to permit the cooling air to be exhausted.

In these figures the lower section of the shroud assembly is indicated generally by the numeral 39. This section substantially surrounds and encloses the motor housing 9 and is provided at its outermost lower edge with a downwardly extending annular flange 40. This section then extends inwardly for a short distance so that it may be suitably mounted on the spacers 15 and is then curved upwardly as at 41. The side of the section then extends in a general upward direction with a slight inward slope, as at 42, and thereafter continues upwardly and inwardly as at 43. The section then terminates in an upwardly and inwardly extending portion 44 which at its upper end is adapted to be pressed against a resilient sealing ring 32 which surrounds the upper portion of the motor housing 9.

The effect of this section 39 is in general similar to that portion of the shroud assembly shown in Fig. .2 which consists of three parts17, 23 and 31.

The cap member 45 is similar in all respects to the cap member 34 and is provided with the downwardly and outwardly extending side portions 46. These side portions are spaced outwardly from the portion 44 thereby to provide an annular passage for the exhaust of the cooling air as it is drawn upwardly to cool the motor and passes outwardly through the ports 14.

A spacer ring 47 is provided which is of such form as to contact the inner surfaces of the cap 45 and the outer surfaces of the portion 44 in the manner shown in Fig. 5. This ring member 47 is preferably of a corrugated configuration so that the spaces 48 are provided as exhaust openings through which the cooling air may pass outwardly to the atmosphere.

A spacing sleeve 49 may be utilized at spaced apart points around the ring and held in place by means of bolts 50 which also pass through the ring 47 thereby to hold the ring in place and to maintain the sides 46 of cap 45 in spaced relation to the upper portion 44 of the bottom section 39.

' It may again be noted that this construction, where the inner or bottom section has a portion extending a considerable distance upwardly within the cap and above the lower edge of the cap, is such that the cooling air for the motor may be quickly exhausted to the atmosphere and yet will prevent water from the outside reaching the motor. It will also be noted that the sides 46 of the cap 45 are sloped downwardly and outwardly in the same general direction as the slope or inclination of the portion 42 on the bottom section 39 so that the two members of the shroud assembly will blend with each other to form a pleasing and streamlined appearance.

It will also be important to note that this form of construction also adapts itself for the application of sound deadening material if it is desired to reduce motor noise. The cap 45 may be provided with sound deadening material 51 on its inner surface in substantially the same manner as shown in Fig. 3. Furthermore, the upper portion 44 of the bottom section 39 may also have sound deadening material applied thereto as shown at 52. In such case, both the inner and outer sides of the annular passage for the exhaust of the cooling air will have sound deadening material thereon and will be extremely effective in absorbing motor sounds and thus reducing motor noise to a minimum during operation of the machine.

Referring now to Fig. 6, there is illustrated a still further modified form of the invention which consists essentially of three separate sections suitably secured together by the use of spacer rings similar to the corrugated ring 47 shown in Fig. 5. In this form, however, the motor cooling air which is drawn inwardly from the atmosphere travels a more circuitous path than in the forms heretofore described.

In Fig. 6 the bottom section 53 is secured in any suitable manner directly to the top of the head assembly 4 and is curved inwardly and upwardly, as at 54, for a short distance and is then again curved inwardly and upwardly in the manner indicated at 55.

The intermediate section 56 has a lower portion 57 which extends generally upwardly and inwardly and then terminates in an upper portion 53 which is offset inwardly from the lower portion 57 and which is adapted to rest on the resilient sealing ring 32. The upper section 59 forms a cap or cover over the motor housing and has sides which extend downwardly and outwardly, as at 60.

In this form of the invention it will be observed that the inclination of the portion 54 on the bottom section 53 is substantially the same as the inclination of the portion 57 of the intermediate section 56. Likewise, the inclination of the down-turned portion 60 of the cap 59 is substantially like the inclination of the other two sections so that all three parts of the shroud assembly will present an external appearance which blends smoothly and in a modern streamlined manner. It will also be seen that the upper portion of one section and the lower portion of the next adjacent section are spaced apart to provide the two annular passages 61 and 62. The bottom section and the intermediate section are held in this spaced apart relation by means of a spacer ring 63 preferably of the corrugated type shown in Fig. 5. Likewise, the sides 60 of cap 59 and the upper portion 58 of the intermediate section 56 are maintained in spaced apart relation by another spacer ring 64 also preferably of the corrugated type. By the use of such spacer rings as. 63 and 64 the various sections are held in spaced apart relation and at the same time provide passageways for the exhaust of the motor cooling air.

In this last form of the invention it will be noted that air is drawn inwardly by the motor cooling fan and will pass upwardly through the annular passage 61. Thereafter the air will be carried downwardly and will be drawn inwardly through the inlet ports 12 at the bottom of the motor housing 9. The air will thereafter be exhausted through the outlet ports 14 in the top of the motor housing and will pass downwardly and outwardly to the atmosphere through the annular passage 62.

As in previous forms sound deadening material may be utilized if desired by applying such material to the underside of the cap 59. Such material may also be applied to the outer surface of the upper portion 58 of the intermediate section 56.

In all forms of the invention the sound deadening may terial may be applied or omitted as desired without af-.

fecting the other advantages present in the use of the shroud assembly illustrated herein.

One of the chief advantages,

the fact that it lends itself to the addition of the sound not heretofore permissible.

Furthermore, the invention permits quick and easy access to the motor and its housing merely by the removal of a few screws, thereby to permit disassembly of the shroud assembly section by section.

The foregoing advantages are combined with another important feature which is that of providing adequate passages for the exhaust of the cooling air and at the same time preventing water from reaching the motor from the outside.

The foregoing advantages are all in addition to that which relates to the appearance of the assembly. smoothly blending lines of the various sections of the assembly in all forms of the invention enhance the appearance and give the effect of modern streamlining which is a very important consideration from the sales standpoint particularly when such an appearance carries with it the other advantages mentioned above.

Changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of parts from those disclosed herein with-1 out in any way departing from the spirit of the invention or sacrificing any of the attendant advantages there-' of, provided, however, that such changes fall within the scope of the claims appended hereto. 7

The invention is hereby claimed as follows:

1. A shroud assembly for the motor and motor housing of tank type vacuum cleaners comprising, a plurality of annular sections enclosing the motor and housing and arranged in superposed and spaced relation, thereby providing an annular passage for the exhaust of motor cooling air, one of said sections being in abutting relation with said motor housing adjacent the upper end thereof, and support means between adjacent sections within the annular passage therebetween to maintain the sections in said relation, said support means being formed to provide air outlet ports for the exhaust air from the annular passage in which it is located the lower edge of an upper section surrounding and overlapping the upper edge of an adjacent lower section.

2. A shroud assembly for the motor and motor housing of tank type vacuum cleaners comprising, a plurality of annular sections enclosing the motor and its housing and arranged in superposed and spaced relation, the outer surfaces of said sections being inclined downwardly and outwardly in substantially equal degrees, thereby however, in utilizing a" shroud assembly of the character herein described is 7 to provide smoothly blending lines from the, top of the uppermost section to the bottom of the lowermost section thereof, and means to maintain said sections in said relation. 7

3. A shroud assembly for the motor and motor housing of tank type vacuum clearners comprising, a lower annular section adapted to surround a portionaof the motor and its housing, an intermediate annular section adapted to surround another portion of the motor and its housing, a cap section adapted to cover an end of the motor and its housing and having sides overlapping said intermediate section in outwardly spaced relation therewith, the space between said intermediate section and the sides of said cap forming an annular passage, and a ring member mounted on said lower section and supporting said intermediate and cap sections in spaced relation.

4. A shroud assembly for the motor and motor housing of tank type. vacuum cleaners comprising, a lower annular section adapted to surround a portion of the motor and its housing, an intermediate annular section adapted to surround another portion of the motor and its housing, a cap section adapted to cover an end of the motor and its housing and having sides overlapping said intermediate section in outwardly spaced relation therewith, the space between said intermediate section and the sides of said cap forming an annular air passage and a ring member mounted on said lower section and supporting said intermediate and cap sections in spaced relation, said ring member having apertures therethrough for the passage of air from said air passage.

5. A shroud assembly for the motor and motor housing of tank type vacuum cleaners comprising, lower and upper sections in overlapping and spaced relation adapted to surround the motor and motor housing, the outer surfaces of said sections being inclined downwardly and out-' wardly in substantially equal degrees, thereby to provide smoothly blending lines from the top of theupper section to the bottom of the lower section, the space between said sections forming an annular air passage, and an annular ring member of corrugated form secured between said sections to maintain them in said overlapping and spaced relation.

6. A shroud assembly for the motor and motor housing of tank type vacuum cleaners comprising, a lower annular section adapted to surround the motor and its housing, the lower end of said section having a larger diameter than the upper end thereof, thereby to provide an air space between said section and the motor housing, an upper cap section adapted to cover an end of the motor and its housing and having sides extending downwardly in spaced relation to and overlapping a portion of said lower section, the space between said sections forming an annular air passage, and support means mounted between said sections to maintain the sections in said spaced and overlapping relation.

7. A shroud assembly for the motor and motor housing of tank type vacuum cleaners comprising, alower up wardly and inwardly inclinedannular section adapted to surround a portion of the motor and its housing'in spaced relation thereto, an intermediate upwardly and inwardly inclined annular section in overlapping and outwardly spaced relation with respect to said lower section, an upper bell-shaped cap section adapted to cover an end of the motor and its housing and having sides extending downwardly in overlapping and spaced relation with respect to said intermediate section, the spaces between said sections forming annular air passages, and support means between adjacent sections to maintain the overlapping and spaced relationship therebetween.

8. A shroud assembly for the motor and motor housing of tank type vacuum cleaners comprising, a lower upwardly and inwardly inclined annular section adapted to surround a portion of the motor and its housing in spaced relation thereto, an intermediate upwardly and inwardly inclined annular section arranged in overlapping and outwardly spaced relation with respect to said lower section, the bottom of the intermediate section being spaced laterally and overhanging the upper end of the lower section, an upper upwardly and inwardly inclined section in overlapping and outwardly spaced relation with respect to said intermediate section, the bottom of the upper section being spaced laterally and overhanging the upper end of the intermediate section, the spaces between adjacent sections forming annular air passages, support means to maintain said sections in said overlapping and spaced relation, and a layer of sound absorbing material on at least one side of at least one of said annular air passages.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Re, 22,077 'Kitto Apr. 21, 1942 1,497,513 Kelley June 10, 1924 1,884,573 Chapman Oct. 25,1932 1,9203 15 Myers Aug. 1, 1933 1,945,833 Swanson Feb. 6, 1934 2,107,819 Faber Feb. 8, 1938 2,139,379 Myers Dec. 6, 1938 2,226,986 Wechsberg Dec. 31, 1940 2,397,171 Troller Mar. 26, 1946 2,731,194 Kent Jan. 17,1956

FOREIGN PATENTS 461,218 Great Britain Feb. 12, 1937 645,329 Germany May 26, 1937 964,401 France Jan. 25, 1950

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Referenced by
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US6364628 *Oct 20, 1998Apr 2, 2002David PottsVertical shaft blower on trailer
US7665227Jul 7, 2006Feb 23, 2010Whirlpool CorporationFabric revitalizing method using low absorbency pads
US7735345Jul 7, 2006Jun 15, 2010Whirlpool CorporationAutomatic fabric treatment appliance with a manual fabric treatment station
US7921578Jul 7, 2006Apr 12, 2011Whirlpool CorporationNebulizer system for a fabric treatment appliance
US8844160Sep 29, 2010Sep 30, 2014Whirlpool CorporationModular fabric revitalizing system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification310/60.00R, 417/234
International ClassificationA47L5/22, A47L5/36
Cooperative ClassificationA47L5/365
European ClassificationA47L5/36B