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Publication numberUS2799273 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1957
Filing dateMar 22, 1955
Priority dateMar 22, 1955
Publication numberUS 2799273 A, US 2799273A, US-A-2799273, US2799273 A, US2799273A
InventorsVincent J Oddo
Original AssigneeVincent J Oddo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Haemostatic catheter
US 2799273 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v. J. oDDo HAEMOSTATIC CATHETER July 1e, 1957- 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filedllarch 22. 1955 Y INVYENTOR. vmm J, oooo July 16, 1957 v. J. oDDo HAEMOSTATIC CATHETER med umn 22.. 1955 y 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 v INVENToR.- VINCENT J. ODDO ATTORNEY United States Patent O lHAEMOSTATIC CATHETER y Vincent J. Oddo, Cranston, R. I. Application March 22, 1955, Serial No. 495,845 4 Claims. (Cl. 12S-325) My present invention Yrelates to a surgical apparatus and more particularly to a haemostatic catheter.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a catheter which can be .used for stopping or checking bleeding in certain types of operations.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a catheter particularly adaptable to check bleeding after a prostatectomy 'has been performed.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a catheter which will apply pressure to the affected areas and check or stop bleeding immediately.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a `haemostatic catheter which is simple in construction and easy and economical to manufacture and assemble.

With the above and other objects and advantageous features in view, my invention consists of a novel arrange ment of parts, more fully disclosed in the detailed description following, in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, and more specifically delined in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. l is a hemisectional view of the male pelvic region.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged view of the bladder and urethra with the catheter of the present invention in place.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the catheter.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged view of the distal end with the balloons inated.

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal section catheter shown in Fig. 4.

In certain types of `operations there is a great -deal of post operative bleeding which -is difficult to check. More particularly, an .operation for the Vremoval of the prostate gland results in bleeding in the prostatic bed and the vesical neck. This is true regardless of the technique or method used in removing the gland. A conventional method of attempting to stop the bleeding is by inserting a balloon catheter, inflating the balloon in the bladder and pulling outwardly. This applies some pressure to the lower portion of the bladder and the upper portion of the vesical neck. But there is no pressure on the prostatic bed or the inferior portion of the vesical neck. Therefore the bleeding will usually continue for about one or two days or longer with the result that the patient becomes very weak.

The present invention is designed to provide a catheter which will apply a direct pressure to the affected areas thus immediately checking or stopping the bleeding. This isaccomplished by providing the catheter with two adjacent balloons designed to press against each other. By positioning one balloon in the bladder and the other in the prostatic bed, direct pressure can be brought to bear on the walls of the prostatic bed and on the vesical neck.

Referring more in ofthe portion of the detail to the drawings illustrating my invention, Figs. 3, 4, and 5 illustrate the construction of the catheter. While any type of material and construction may be used, I prefer that the catheter be made in an integral one piece construction of tlexible rubber.

2,799,273 Patented July 16, 1957 The catheter comprises a tubular body portion 10 having a central drainage channel 11 which is closed at the distal end 12. The body portion 10 vis provided with one or more openings 13 adjacent the distal end 12 and communicating with the channel 11. Integrally mounted on the body portion 10 and spaced from thel distal end but adjacent thereto is an inatable balloon portion 14. Mounted on the tubular body 10 and slightly spaced from the balloon 14 is al second balloon 15 to the same size, shape and capacity as the balloon 14.

A lplurality of inating ducts are imbedded or formed in the walls of vthe tubular portion 10, the duct 16 communicating with the balloon 14 and the duct 17 communicating with the balloon 15. The rear end of the catheter is trifurcated as shown in Fig. 3. A funnel portion 18 communicating with the drainage channel 11 and the funnel portions 19' and 20 communicating with the inflating ducts '16 and 17.

It is preferable that the balloons 14 and 15 be shaped as illustrated in a general torus shape having bulging ends so that the adjacent walls of the balloons will press against each other in inated position as shown in Figs. 4 and 5. With this construction it is of course possible to inate one balloon more than vthe other as the circumstances may require and either air or water may be used.

The particular application of the above construction ICC as a haemostatic catheter is illustrated in Figs. l and 2.

Referring to Fig. l, the general area of the lower male pelvic region comprises a bladder 21, a urethra 22, and a vesical neck 23 which provides the muscular control between bladder and the urethra. The prostate gland-24 is of generally conical shape and surrounds the urethra just below the vesical neck 23. It is generally enclosed in a bed or -sheath 25 comprising the peri-prostatic tissues. vIn front of this area are the suspensory ligament 26, a symphysis 27 and Campers fascia 28. To the rear is the rectum 29 .and the seminal vesicle 30. Below the prostate area are various glands and ducts, the scrotal septum 31, and the yperineurn 32.

There are several methods of removing the prostate gland 24. One method is to cut through the front wall of the abdomen and through the wall of the bladder 21. The surgeon then inserts his finger through the vesical neck 23 and peels the prostate gland 24 away from the tissues 25 Vand removes it. Another method is to make an incision from underneath through the perineum 32 and remove the prostate gland 24 from that direction. In both cases the portion of the urethra which is sur rounded by the prostate gland is also torn out. There is thus bleeding at the vesical neck 23 and in the entire surface of the tissues 25. At this point, referring to Fig. 2, the catheter is inserted through the urethra 22 so that the distal end 12 extends into the bladder 2i. The balloon 14 is now inated through the duct 16 and the catheter pulled downwardly so that the balloon 14 rests on the vesical neck 23. The second balloon 15 is now inflated through the duct 17 so that it will completely fill the cavity formed by the tissues 25 from which the prostate gland 24 was removed. Pressure on the catheter is now released and the catheter is now locked in place and will not fall in or out. Ultimately these tissues and muscles will shrink and organize to form a new urethral passageway. However, at this time the area is enlarged and pliable and will take the shape of the balloon 15 as it is inflated. With both balloons inated the vesical neck 23 will be pressed from above and below between the two balloons stopping the bleeding in this area. The balloon 15 will also press outwardly and downwardly against the walls of the tissues 25 checking the bleeding from these tissues. ln the meanwhile, the bladder drains through the openings 13 and the drainage channel 11 in the usual manner.

In removing the prostrate gland many veins and arteries are torn and ruptured and there is great danger of bleeding and shock following a prostrate operation. The catheter of the present invention is designed to check and prevent these complications. The bleeding is checked almost immediately and the healing is more rapid.

The catheter of the present invention may also be used in other types of operations. For example, in certain lung operations the chest cavity is pierced and drained. A conventional catheter with one balloon is inserted. However, such catheters must be taped so that they will not fall into the chest cavity. The catheter ofthe present invention can be positioned so that one balloon will inilate inside the cavity and the second one outside the chest. The catheter will then be immovably positioned and will not move either in or out. Furthermore, the pressure between the two balloons will prevent any extraneous leakage and all drainage will be through the catheter.

While the catheter of the present invention is equipped with two balloons, it can also be used in the same manner as any other conventional catheter by inating only one of the balloons. A choice is thus afforded as to how far the doctor wishes the distal end to extend into the drainage area.

The catheter may be constructed in any desired manner and the shape and size of the various parts may be readily altered without departing from the invention as deiined in the appended claims.

I claim:

l. A surgical accessory comprising an elongated tubular body portion having a central longitudinal drainage channel closed at the distal end, a drainage opening in said body portion adjacent the distal end and communieating with said drainage channel, an iniiatable balloon on said body portion adjacent the drainage opening, a second inflatable balloon on said body portion in close proximity to said first balloon, said balloons pressing against each other in inflated position, said body portion having separate inflation channels each communicating with one of said balloons, and separate conduits at the proximal end of said body portion for said drainage channel and said ination channels.

2. A surgical accessory comprising an integral onepiece exible rubber tubular body portion having a central longitudinal drainage channel closed at the distal end, a plurality of drainage openings in said body portion adjacent the distal end and communicating with said drainage channel, an inatable balloon on said body portion adjacent the drainage openings, a second iniiatable balloon on said body portion in close proximity to said iirst balloon, said balloons pressing against each other in inflated position, said balloons being of the same shape and size, said body portion having separate ination channels each communicating with one of said balloons, and separate conduits at the proximal end of said body portion for said drainage channel and said inflation channels.

3. A surgical accessory comprising an elongated tubular body portion having a central longitudinal drainage channel closed at the distal end, a drainage opening in said body portion adjacent the distal end and communieating with said drainage channel, an inatable balloon on said body portion adjacent the drainage opening, a second infiatable balloon on said body portion in close proximity to said iirst balloon, said balloons pressing against each other in inated position, said balloons both being of a generally torus shape, said body portion having separate ination channels each communicating with one ofv said balloons, and separate conduits at the proximal end of said body portion for said drainage channel and said iniiation channels.

4. A surgical accessory comprising an integral onepiece exible rubber tubular body portion having a central longitudinal drainage channel closed at the distal end, a plurality of drainage openings in said body portion adjacent the distal end and communicating with said drainage channel, an inflatable balloon on said body portion adjacent the drainage openings, a second inflatable balloon on said body portion in close proximity to said rst balloon, said balloons pressing against each other in inated position, said balloons both being of a generally torus shape, said balloons being of the same shape and size, said body portion having separate inlation channels each communicating with one of said balloons, and separate conduits at the proximal end of said body portion for said drainage channel and said inlation channels.

Referencesy Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,210,744 Winder Aug. 6, 1940 2,493,326 Trinder Ian. 3, 1950 2,642,874 Keeling Jan.r 23, 1953 2,693,191 Raiche Nov. 2, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2210744 *Jan 17, 1939Aug 6, 1940American Anode IncCatheter
US2493326 *Mar 1, 1949Jan 3, 1950John H TrinderTampon for control of intractable nasal hemorrhages
US2642874 *Jun 4, 1951Jun 23, 1953Wilmer B KeelingInstrument for treating prostate glands
US2693191 *Jul 16, 1951Nov 2, 1954Davol Rubber CoIncontinence urinal balloon plug
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/101.5, 604/919
International ClassificationA61F2/958
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/1011
European ClassificationA61M25/10D