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Publication numberUS2799314 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1957
Filing dateSep 2, 1952
Priority dateSep 7, 1951
Publication numberUS 2799314 A, US 2799314A, US-A-2799314, US2799314 A, US2799314A
InventorsDreyer Andre, Toledo Maurice F De
Original AssigneeDreyer Andre, Toledo Maurice F De
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Leak-proof containers for liquids
US 2799314 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1957 A. DREYER ETAL 2,799,314

LEAK-PROOF CONTAINERS FOR LIQUIDS Filed Sept. 2, 1952 v 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 "51" lNVE N,TO RS I I WMLM July 16, 1957 A. DREYER ETAL 2,799,314

LEAK-PROOF CONTAINERS FOR LIQUIDS Filed Sept. 2, 1952 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 IMNmRSZ mm M United States Patent '0 Andr Dreyer and Maurice F. de Toledo, Geneva, Switzerland Application September 2, 1952, Serial No. 307,438

Claims priority, application Switzerland September 7, 1951 4 Claims. (Cl. 150-.5)

The principal object of the present invention is to provide an absolutely leak-proof container for liquids,

particularly for distribution thereof.

The container comprises boundary walls of an impervious pliable material defining a liquid-receiving space, a filling and emptying duct attached to the edges of an opening of said container and extending into the inside of said container and having an orifice at the inner end thereof, said duct comprising a pair of superimposed pliable foils laterally joined together and adapted to be collapsed by the pressure of liquid in said container to operate as a check valve, said duct defining a first point of reduced cross-sectional area situated immediately adjacent said opening of said container to preclude the pressure of liquid in said container from pushing said duct out of said container, said duct also defining a second point of reduced cross-sectional area situated between said first point of reduced cross-sectional area and said orifice of said duct, said second point of reduced cross-sectional area being formed by bonds between said foils interconnecting marginal zones thereof and extending transversely to said duct.

The aforementioned bonds extending along the fiexible portion of the duct do not affect the pliability of the latter transversely to the plane of the sheets or foils of which it is made up, but they provide an effective bracing means for the edges of the duct tending to preclude the duct from being upset by internal fluid pressure, i. e. its inside from being pushed outwardly.

' The container may be made, wholly or in part, of a flexible material compatible with the properties of the fluid which it is intended to contain and the duct or conduit may be made, wholly or in part, of the same inaterial. The cost of the container depends largely on'the material of which it is made. If this material is inexpensive the container may be disposed of after use instead of being recovered and cleaned. This ensures a great simplification in handling the distribution of certain liquid products, such as' milk, and therefore increased economy.

The drawing annexed hereto shows, by way of example and diagrammatically, five embodiments of the container according to the invention.

'Fig. 1 is an elevational view of a first embodiment of the said container.

Fig. 2 is a section along line 22 of Fig. 1.

' Fig. 3 is a section similar to Fig. 2, the container however being shown during filling.

' Fig. 4 is a section along 44 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is an elevational view of a second embodiment. Figs. 6, 7 and 8, are respectively, sections along lines 6'6, 7-7 and 88 of Fig. 5. v

4 Fig. 9 is an elevational view of a third embodiment of the invention.

Fig. l0.is a section along line 10-10 of Fig. 9.

Fig. l1 is an elevational view of a fourth embodiment of'theinvention.

ice

Fig. 12 is a section along line 12'-12 of Fig. 11.

Fig. 13 is a section similar to that of Fig. 12, showing the container during filling.

Fig. 14 is a section along line 14 -14 of Fig. 11.

Fig. 15 is an elevational view of a fifth embodiment of the invention.

Fig. 16 is a section along line 1616 of Fig. 15, and

Fig. 17 is a section similar to Fig. 16, showing the container during filling.

In all the figures of the drawing, the same reference numerals indicate like parts or members. j

The container shown in Figs. 1 to 4 consists of a sheet of impervious flexible material, folded over itself at 1 and bonded at 2 at its edges opposite to the fold 1. The tubular structure thus formed is closed at its ends also by an appropriate bond extending along the respective end edges of the sheet of flexible or pliable material as shown at 3 and 4.

The two walls 5 and 6 of the container thus formed are bonded together internally along lines 7 and 8. Holes 9 and 10 provided in each of the corners of the containers are isolated from the principal part thereof by bonds 7 and 8. These holes may be used for suspending the container, if desired.

A duct or conduit 11 passes through the walls of the container and extends into the inside of the latter. This duct or conduit is made up of two sheets of flexible material (which may be the same material as that forming the container proper), bonded together at their edges 12 and 13. Duct or conduit 11 is fixedly supported by the container. The inside of duct 11 is provided with a constriction 14, obtained by bonding its two constituent sheets together along a first bond extending between points 15 and 16 and along a second bond extending between points 17 and 18. The width or crosssectional area of the passage formed between points 16 and 18 is smaller than the width or cross-sectional area oforifice 19 in the container. The width or cross-sectional area of the duct or conduit 11 decreases gradually along a portion of its length towards orifice 19.

The portion of duct 11 within the container forms a check valve. Constriction 14 prevents the valve formed by duct or conduit 11 from being pushed out from the inside of the container by the action of pressure prevailing therein. This danger is imminent when the container is subjected to an outer pressure. The juxtaposed inner surfaces of the inner part of the duct or conduit 11 operating as a check valve must be relatively large to cause firm mutual adherence of said surfaces when flattened and pressed one against the other under the action of the pressure of the liquid Within the container. The need of providing surfaces of large area to operate as a check valve requires a conduit 11 of relatively large size, which could easily be turned back outwardly by the action of pressure of a fluid within the container if this were not rendered impossible by the constriction 14.

When the container is empty, practically the entire surfaces of its two walls 5 and 6 are in physical engagement or contact with each other. Under such conditions the two sheets forming the duct or conduit 11 are also in physical engagement or contact with each other practically on their entire surface. in Figs. 2 and 4 of the draw ing these sheets are shown as being spaced from each other for claritys sake. The bonds at the edges 12 and 13 of the sheets forming the duct or conduit 11 constitute strengthening ribs for the conduit, particularly the part thereof Where its width diminishes gradually. These strengthening ribs preclude the duct or conduit 11 from folding over itself from the orifice 19 under the action of fluid pressure prevailing in the container. Since the two sheets forming the duct or conduit 11 are in physical engagement or contact with each other, an escape of the contents of the container through the orifice 19 is practically impossible, the pressure prevailing in the container tending to m in a n the hee in phys cal e gag m n n perat e sh et em m tns p r To fill the container a rigid tube 29 (Fig. 3) may be inserted in the duct or conduit 11 and the filling fluid made to flow through this tube into the container. During the filling operation the lips of the orifice 19 will S a d slightly apart as shown in Fig. 3, but as soon as the flow of fluid into the container ceases the lips will close again.

To empty the container the latter may be opened by tearing its wall. As an alternative, tube 20 may be inserted into the duct or conduit 11 in such a Way as to emerge from, or project beyond, the orifice 19.

Instead of being formed by one single sheet folded over itself at 1,, the container may be constituted by two sheets bonded together along their entire periphery. Instead of being formed by two sheets bonded together at their edges,

conduit 11 may be constituted by a single sheet of suitable plastic material folded over itself and bonded together at the two registering edges of the sheet.

In the container shown in Figs. 5, 6, 7 and 3, the filling duct or conduit 11 is formed by folding the corner region of the walls 5 and 6 of the container to the inside thereof. The walls 5 and 6 of the container are bonded to each other at 21 between the points 22 and 23, and at 24 between the points 25 and 26. Walls 5 and 6 are also bonded together between the points 22 and 27 and at 28. The latter bond 28 has a triangular shape. It gives to the duct or conduit 11 cross-sectional area of gradually decreasing size. The inner orifice 19 of the duct or conduit is formed between bonds 28 and 27. Another orifice 29 of the duct or conduit is formed between the points 23 and 25. When the container is filled, duct or conduit 11 is held closed not only in the region of its orifice 19, but throughout its whole length. Bond 28 and the bond extending from the point 22 to the point 27 form strength ening ribs precluding duct 11 from being upset and pushed out of the container by the pressure of fluid stored therein. To fill the container a tube 20 of a funnel may be inserted in the duct or conduit by passing it through the orifice 29 until it projects beyond orifice 1?.

The container shown in Figs. 9 and 10 is formed of a flat tube closed by bonds 3 and at the ends thereof. Its filling duct or conduit 11 is formed by two sheets bonded to each other along their edges 12 and i3. Duct 11 is provided with lips adjacent to its outer orifice 29 which lips are connected to one of the walls of the container by bonds 3% and 31. The bonded together edges 12 and 13 of duct or conduit 11 form strengthening ribs precluding the duct or conduit 11 from being turned inside out by the pressure of fluid stored within the container. When the container is filled with fluid its filling duct or conduit is held closed and operated as a check valve. Filling and emptying of the container shown in Figs. 9 and 10 is effected in the same manner as filling and emptying of the two containers shown in Figs. 1 to 8, inclusive.

The container shown in Figs. 11 to 14 includes a casing which is made of a very thin tube of flexible material, such as, for example, polyethylene. The tube is closed at the lower end by a bond 4 between juxtaposed parts 5 and 6 of its wall. At its upper end, the casing is partly closed by two lengths of bond 3 extending transversely from each of the corners of the casing similarly to bond 4. A duct or conduit 11 inserted into the casing is placed between the two spaced bonds 3. This conduit is made of two sheets of a flexible or pliable material of substantially the same kind as that of which the casing is made. These sheets are joined to each other by bonds 12 and i3 slightly inciined with respect to the longitudinal axis of the duct or conduit and of the container. Bonds 12, i3 terminate a certain distance from the lower or inner end of the conduit, so as to leave an orifice i between the sheets, at the lower end of the conduit. Each of the two sheets is cut to form a point and the two points formed by the two sheets are superimposed in registry. Thus the conduit forms two floating lips 32 decreasing in width from their respective point of attachment to the duct or conduit. The shape of lips 32 is pointed and they are arranged opposite each other. As shown in Figs. 11 to 14 the conduit 11 is secured to the casing by bonds 1516 and 1718 which are extensions of bonds 3. Bonds lS-16 and 17-48 join the two sides of the walls of the casing and the two sheets forming duct or conduit 11. Bonds 1516 and 17-18 overlap with bonds 12 and 13 uniting the sheets which form duct 11. They form lateral extensions of the central bonds 16-18 connecting each sheet to the adjacent wall of the casing. For storing certain liquids, for example not very viscous liquids, it may be advantageous that the thickness of each lip 32 i. e. the thickness of the sheet material of which it is made, decrease from the point of attachment of the lip to the duct or conduit.

It will be observed that the bonds 15-16 and 1 7.-18 define a constriction 14 of the conduit whose width or cross-sectional area is smaller than that of the inner orifice 19 in the container. Below the bonds 15-16 and 1718 the width or cross-sectional area of the conduit, limited by the bonds 12 and 13, decreases progressively toward the inside of the container. It will also be observed that the duct or conduit 11 is split along its two lateral edges situated outside of the casing. If desired, the two sheets forming duct 11 may also be bonded together at the lateral edges thereof situated outside of the casing.

This container is able to resist a great amount of pressure when it is filled with fluid without any leakage of the liquid ,or gas contained therein. When the container is strongly squeezed or struck, the casing bursts rather than allowing the contents thereof to escape through the duct or conduit.

According to a variant of the invention not shown, the duct or conduit is made from a length of tubing of flexible material having a smaller diameter than the tube of which the casing is formed. In this embodiment of the invention the portion of the conduit situated outside the casing would be closed laterally, and there would be no need of making additional bonds at this point.

When making the bonds 1516 and 1718 in the structure of Figs. 11 to 13 it is generally necessary to place an intermediary sheet, for instance a sheet of cellulose acetate, between the internal walls of the duct or conduit 11 in order to prevent these walls from sticking together. Use of such an intermediary sheet or spacer may be dispensed with if the portions of duct or conduit 11 intended to form constriction 14, rather than to be permanently bonded together, are coated with a suitable adhesive forming a separable bond but precluding the formation of a permanent bond. If the constricted portion 14 is internally coated with an adhesive forming a separable bond, the filled container may be sealed at 14 by applying pressure from the outside thereof against the adhesive coated surfaces. When it is intended to empty the container a rigid tube is introduced into the duct or orifice 11, separating the walls thereof by overcoming the action of the adhesive, which tube can then be used to empty the container through it.

If desired a filling tube can be applied when filling the container for separating the walls of the duct or conduit adhering to each other by virtue of a coating of adhesive.

This adhesive ought to be chosen appropriately depending upon the contents of the container. If the liquid is a beverage the adhesive should not contain any poisonous substance and substance tending to affect taste or odor. A suitable adhesive for this application is a synthetic resin-type adhesive.

The container shown in Figs. 15 to 17 includes a casing 1 which is made of a very thin tube of flexible material, such as, for example, polyethylene. The tube is closed at the lower end of the casing by a bond 4 between a part of 'itswall 5 and the opposite part of wall 6. At

its upper end the casing is partly closed by two bonds 3 which are similar to the bond 4 extending transversely across the longitudinal edges of the said casing, and by two bonds 3' substantially parallel to bonds 3. Bonds 3 and 3' are spaced a certain distance from each other. A duct or conduit 11 is inserted into the casing at right angles to and between the bonds 3 and 3'. The duct or conduit 11 is made of two sheets of a flexible material similar to that forming the casing. These sheets are joined together by bonds 12 and 13 leaving therebetween an orifice 19 situated at the lower end of the duct or conduit 11. The duct or conduit 11 is secured to the casing by bonds 15-16 and 17-18 forming extensions of bonds 3 and connecting the walls of the casing to the two sheets forming the duct or conduit 11. Bonds 15-16 and 17-18 join bonds 12 and 13 uniting the two duct-forming sheets and join also the central bonds connecting each sheet to the adjacent wall of the casing between the points 16 and 18. A constriction 14 formed within the duct or conduit 11 serves the same purpose as a similar constriction in the other embodiments of the invention. The conduit 11 is also secured to the casing by bonds 33 and 34 which are extensions of the bonds 3' and connect the walls of the casing and the two sheets forming duct or conduit 11. Bond 34 extends downwards as far as the bonds 15-16 and 17-18 hence duct or conduit 11 is bonded to the wall 5 of the casing over a relatively large area situated within a space between the bonds 3 and 3'. This space is opened laterally to the exterior of the container by means of a lateral slit 35, cut into the casing between the bonds 3 and 3', in order to allow the introduction of a rigid tube 20 into this space.

When the tube 20 is introduced into the space formed between the bonds 3 and 3, the conduit 11 ismade to bend or curve around tube 20, thus partially encircling tube 20. Thus an additional closing means is added to the check valve action of conduit 11 and consequently the container rendered more tight.

In the container shown the length of the conduit 11 inside the container is so shaped as to have a tendency to roll up spirally around itself, as shownin Fig. 16. This arrangement also notably improves the'tightness of the check valve formed by the conduit 11. The tendency to wind up or curl spirally around itself exhibited by the length of the conduit 11 inside the casing 1 can be brought about in several different ways. For instance, a part of the length of conduit 11 may be wound around a mandrel of small diameter and heat-treated while on the mandrel at a temperature sufficiently high to soften the material. This heat treatment can be carried out by means of a high frequency generator, the above referredto mandrel being made of a conductive material and forming one of the armatures of a condenser. The portion of conduit 11 intended to be heat-treated forms the dielectric of the condenser, and this portion is surrounded by another electrode. When carrying this process into effect it may be necessary to place intermediary sheets, for instance sheets of glass fiber coated with silicone, between the sheets forming conduit 11 and between the turns of conduit 11 Wound around the mandrel, in order to prevent sticking of these sheets and these turns.

The embodiment of the invention shown in Figs. 15 to 17 has the advantage that it is an integrated unit since it includes a housing'containing a rigid tube 20 which can be used for filling and for emptying the container. Because of the elasticity of the material of which casing 1 and conduit 11 are made, the tube 20 when placed into the space between the bonds 3 and 3' cannot easily get lost, it being frictionally held in the position thereof. When it is desired to take out tube 20, it is only necessary to pinch the container at the point thereof opposite its opening 35, so as to partly bring tube 20 out through opening 35. The tube can then be seized and taken completely out of the container to introduce it intothe com duit 11, between the en ds 16 and 18 of bonds 15-16 and 17-18, and to unwind the length of conduit 11 situated inside the casing by pushing the tube into the conduit 11. When conduit 11 has been so unwound, the container can be easily filled or emptied through the tube 20. When the tube 20 is afterwards withdrawn from the conduit 11, the length of the latter which is inside the casing 1 winds up again around itself, thus ensuring perfect tightness of the container.

What we claim is:

1. A fluid-tight container comprising boundary walls of an impervious pliable material defining a liquid-receiving space, a filling and emptying duct arranged in an opening of said container and attached to the edges of said opening, said duct extending into the inside of said container and having an orifice at the inner end thereof, said duct comprising a pair of superimposed pliable foils laterally joined together and adapted to be collapsed by the pressure of liquid in said container to operate as a check valve, means for constricting said duct to define a first point of reduced cross-sectional area situated immediately adjacent said opening of said container to preclude the pressure of liquid in said container from pushing said duct out of said container, and said duct defining a second point of reduced cross-sectional area situated between said first point of reduced crosssectional area and said orifice of said duct, said second point of reduced cross-sectional area being formed by bonds between said foils interconnecting marginal zones thereof.

2. A fluid-tight container as specified in claim 1 wherein said bonds between said foils converge toward said orifice of said duct.

3. A fluid-tight container comprising boundary walls of an impervious pliable material defining a liquid-receiving space, a filling and emptying duct arranged in an opening of said container and attached to the edges of said opening, said duct extending into the inside of said container and having an orifice at the inner end thereof, said duct comprising a pair of superimposed pliable foils laterally joined together and adapted to be collapsed by the pressure of liquid in said container to operate as a check valve, means for contricting said duct to define 'a first point of reduced cross-sectional area situated immediately adjacent said opening of said container to preclude the pressure of liquid in said container from pushing said duct out of said container, said duct further defining a second point of reduced cross-sectional area situated between said first point of reduced cross-sectional area and said orifice of said duct, said second point of reduced cross-sectional area being formed by bonds between said foils interconnecting marginal zones thereof, and the ends of said foils situated adjacent said orifice of said duct being free to be moved transversely to said duct.

4. A fluid-tight container comprising boundary walls of an impervious pliable material defining a liquid receiving space, a filling and emptying duct arranged in an opening of said container attached to the edges of said opening, said duct extending into the inside of said container and having an orifice at the inner end thereof, said duct comprising a pair of superimposed pliable foils laterally joined together and adapted to be collapsed by the pressure of liquid in said container to operate as a check valve, means for constricting said duct to define a first point of reduced cross-sectional area situated immediately adjacent said opening of said container to preclude the pressure of liquid in said container from pushing said duct out of said container, said duct defining a second point of reduced cross-sectional area situated between said first point of reduced cross-sectional area and said orifice of said duct, said second point of reduced crosssectional area being formed by bonds between said foils interconnecting marginal zones thereof, and the cross-sec- 8 tjonal area of said first point of reduced cross-sectional 465,649 Roberts Dec. 22, 1891 area being smaller than the cross-sectional area of said 683,897 Bates Oct. 8, 1901 second point of reduced cross-sectional area. 1,689,453 Randolph Oct. 30, 192&

2,040,356 Butcher May 12, 1936 References Cited in the file of-this patent 5 2,068,134 Houghton Jan. 19, 1937 UN TED STATES PATENTS 2 02 M zg y 1 4 Re. 12,081 Bates Feb, 17, 1903 R ,3 7 K n t-, -----t-t---t-e-t-t-- A 1941

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Classifications
U.S. Classification383/44, 383/55, 383/49, 383/9, 383/58, 383/904
International ClassificationB65D33/38, B65D30/24
Cooperative ClassificationB65D31/145, Y10S383/904
European ClassificationB65D31/14B