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Publication numberUS2800330 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1957
Filing dateFeb 24, 1955
Priority dateFeb 24, 1955
Publication numberUS 2800330 A, US 2800330A, US-A-2800330, US2800330 A, US2800330A
InventorsAlan H Pickard
Original AssigneeParker Brothers Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game board apparatus
US 2800330 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 23, 1957 A, H, P K RD 2,800,330

- GAME BOARD APPARATUS Filed Feb. 24, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 LL JIIL July 23, 1957 A. H. PICKARD A 2,800,330

GAME BOARD AE5PARATUS med Feb. 24, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 AIRPORT LANDING HAZARD cARos CARD A5 TRON LOSE GAIN MOVE PMNE 5-POINT$ IO-POINTS 2- SIDEW/IYS MOVE MAP FORWHRD I-SPACE j yd u yiuf 6'0 I fia erzar v j" ,1; film/z EFaZ/Zzzrd United rates Patent GAME BOARD APPARATUS Alan H. Pickard, Leeds, England, assignor to Parker Brothers, Inc., Salem, Mass, a corporation of Maine Application February 24, 1955, Serial No. 496,366

2 Claims. (Cl. 273-134) This invention relates to games and more especially to a game of the type including a board, game pieces and playing cards for directing movement of the game pieces and totalling the final score.

The principal objects of the invention are to provide a game which is interesting, entertaining and instructive, which can be played with a considerable amount of competitive skill by adults, although, always attendant by a certain amount of luck or can be played with equal interest and satisfaction by children without much skill or though, which is attractive and appealing in its makeup, which is adapted to be modified in various ways in its pictorial aspect without changing its mode of play, which is adapted to be manufactured of paper or paperboard products, plastics, wood or metal and which in its makeup is durable and will withstand prolonged use.

As herein illustrated the game comprises a game board having a stationary transparent playing surface for receiving game pieces and a subjacent playing field movable therebeneath, the playing field being in the form of a web wound on rollers and having on its surface indicia representing an itinerary of travel and also having distributed therealong areas which when brought into juxtaposition with a game piece by play will entitle the participant to a reward or subject him to a penalty. Playing pieces of different kind are also provided, one for each participant adapted to be placed on the stationary playing surface and to moved about on the surface in accordance with instructions. There are three distinct sets of playing cards, one set carrying instructions for movement of the pieces. A given number of these cards is distributed to each participant at the commencement of the game and each participant in turn is entitled to select from his hand of cards any one and having selected a card moves his playing piece in accordance with the instructions thereon, along the playing surface and/ or the playing field therebeneath. Movement of the playing pieces and/ or the playing field may bring into juxtaposition areas representing reward or penalization and playing pieces of one or more of the participants and as this happens cards from the other two groups of cards bearing plus and minus points of reward for adding to the final score or penalization for subtracting from the final score are distributed to the successful or unsuccessful participant. The web has marked thereon a starting place, a finish place and is divided into a specific number of unit areas by spaced parallel longitudinally and transversely extending lines for guiding movement of the pieces in accordance with instructions. The game is terminated automatically by appearance of the finsh mark below the transparent playing surface at the end opposite the starting end. The game board comprises a flat supporting surface which has in it a transparent panel and the web is mounted on the spaced parallel rollers therebeneath, one at each end. The board is in the form of a hollow box having a top, bottom, sides and ends and the ends of the top are provided with transversely extending openings forming pockets within which the rollers are journaled for rotation in a manner to permit traversing of the web from one to the other across the top. A resilient lip projects downwardly from the inner edge of each pocket opening for engagement with the coils of the web on the roller at that end to brake its rotation and thus to insure tight winding and to prevent looseness of the coils when winding. A horizontal lip at the opposite edge of each opening partially closes the same, preventing lifting of the rolls from the pockets by the unwinding forces applied thereto. The ends of the rolls are grooved and are engaged with recesses formed in the walls for preventing endwise movement thereof. The transparent panel is a window in a cover applied to the top to cover both the web and the pockets. The sides of the cover have recesses therein adapted to embrace and enter the grooves in the ends of the rolls and the ends of the cover have locking tongues engageable with slots in the ends of the board to hold the cover at a predetermined spacing from the supporting surface to permit free movement of the web beneath the window.

The invention will now be described in greater detail with reference to the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of the game board;

Fig. 2 is a side view of the game board;

Fig. 3 is an end view of the game board;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the game board with the cover removed, partly broken away and with one end partially folded;

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the playing field mounted on rollers showing the indicia printed on the field;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary elevation at one side near one end of the game board enlarged to show the bearing for the roller and course of travel of the movable playing field;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary vertical section longitudinally of the bottom showing the end structure of the bottom;

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary elevation of the cover at one side near one end showing the locking flap and bearing notch;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary elevation of the cover at one end showing the locking flap;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary vertical section of the cover showing the window structure;

Fig. 11 is a transverse vertical section taken on the line 11-11 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 12 shows the back and front faces of the playing cards;

Fig. 13 shows the back and front faces of the penalty imposing scoring points;

Fig. 14 shows the back and front faces of reward imposing playing points; and

Fig. 15 shows a perspective of a playing piece.

Referring to the figures the game 10 comprises essentially a playing board 12, a movable playing field 14 supported thereby and a cover 16 including a transparent fixed playing surface 17, beneath which the playing field is movable. The playing board, Fig. 4, is a substantially rectangular hollow box comprised of paperboard of suflicient stiffness to provide the necessary rigidity and has a fiat bottom 18, Fig. 7, a fiat top 20, Fig. 4, spaced vertically therefrom, spaced parallel ends 22. and spaced parallel sides 24. The sides 24 rise vertically from the bottom 18 and the top 20 is connected along its opposite edges to the upper edges of the sides. In the top 20 near its opposite ends are transversely extending openings 26 having inner and outer edges defining pockets at the ends of the board for reception of rollers as will be described hereinafter. The inner edge of each opening, Figs. 6 and 7, has a downwardly and outwardly extending lip 28 which is an integral part of the top and is formed by making a transverse cut through the top which forms the outer edge of the opening and spaced parallel lateral cuts at opposite ends of the transverse cut which coincide with the edges of the box and by folding the severed material along a transverse line to form the inner edge of the opening. The sides of the box at the ends of the openings are provided with upwardly open notches 30 cut downwardly from the upper edges of the sides which from bearings for the -rollers mentioned above.

The end walls of the box are formed integral with the bottom and are hinged at 32 so that they may be folded upwardly therefrom. The end wallshave hinged locking tongues 34 at their upper extremities which may be frictionally engaged beneath the upper wall of the box and are preferably of greater width than the width of the narrow portion of the top between the outer edge of the opening therein and its end edge so that a part of the tongue projects horizontally inwardly into the opening 26.

A roller 36 is journaled-in each pair of the journal bearings 30 in the sides of the box and each roll is provided 'at its opposite ends with a peripheral groove 38 of such width as to receive the edge thickness of the wall of the box within the journal.

The playing field 14 (Fig. is in the form of a web of flexible sheet material, for example, paper or fabric attached at its ends to the rolls 36 and long enough to provide a field which may be moved from one roll to the other beneath the window. The web passes from one roller to the other upwardly through the open mouth of the pocket in which the roll is seated over the inner edge of the opening across the top of the box and downwardly into the opposite opening in which the other roll is seated. The lip in each of the openings bears against the inner side of the roll frictionally resisting rotation and hence preventing the coils on the rollers from becoming loose and thus causing slack in the web during play. The edge of the tongue 34 which projects inwardly from the opposite or outer edge of the opening 26 partially overlies the upper part of the roll thus preventing the rolls from lifting due to the drawing 01f force and also guiding the web as it is drawn off so that it will run smoothly over the top 20 and will not bulge upwardly at its ends.

The web carries on its surface between its opposite edges a portrayal of an itinerary, for example, it might be a continuous map showing the various countries in the order of their occurrence circumferentially of the world as shown in Fig. 5 by the land and ocean areas 40 and 41 distributed along the web. Alternatively, however, a journey through a particular country may be portrayed or again an event of local interest such as a racetrack, an obstacle course, a baseball game or the like. Distributed along the web in conjunction with the particular portrayal are also areas 42 and 44 which broadly are termed Safe Areas and Hazardous Areas. As herein illustrated the pictorial carried by the web is a map round the world and at various points in the map there are safe spots represented as Airports on which a plane may safely land and Hazard Spots represented by electrical storms, tornadoes and the like which if landed upon would be unsafe. The web is divided throughout its area by spaced parallel longitudinally and transversely extending lines 43 which divide the web into a plurality of small squares of uniform size and provide means for counting off the distance of game piece is to be moved along its course in accordance with play. At one end of the web there is printed transversely thereof a line of starting markers numbered in order from left to right, 1, 5, 2, 3, 6 and 4. At the opposite end of the web there is marked the words Game Over.

The cover 16 (Figs. 8, 9 and 10) has a top .52, ends 54 and sides 56 and is adapted to fit snugly over the top of the box. The sides 56 are provided with downwardly open notches 58 corresponding to the notches 30 in the side walls of the box, both in shapeyand positionv so as to embrace the top or upper sides of the rollers when the cover is placed on the box. Thus the notches 30 and 58 cooperate to provide circular bearings for the'ends of the rolls. Within the top 52 of the cover there is a large rectangular opening for reception of the transparen playing surface 17. A border within the order of /2'is left along each edge of the web and the transverse width of the opening is made approximately as wide as the space between the borders. The length of the opening is approximately equal to the distance between the openings in the top of the box. Within this opening there is cemented or otherwise attached to the underside of the cover a transparent element, for example, any one of the common transparent plastics, an acetate plastic being suitable. A fiexible plastic is preferred when the box and cover are made of paperboard or other flexible material since there will not be as much danger of the window being cracked. If the box is made of a rigid material, for example, molded plastic or wood, or metal the window may then of course be made of glass.

At each end of the cover there is a locking tongue 57 adapted to be engaged within slots 59 at the ends of the bottom to hold the cover in place and spaced sufficiently from the playing field to permit it to be moved only beneath the cover.

A plurality of game pieces 60 is provided in the form of airplanes (Fig. 15) of different colors so that each participant may distinguish his plane from the others. Three sets of cards (Figs. 12, 13 and 14) are provided. One set of cards have marked on one side the word Astron and on the opposite side at opposite sides of a dividing line, instructions as to the movement of a plane and/or the movement of the playing field. For example, as shown in Fig. 12 there is printed on the card Move Plane Two Sideways, Move Map Forward One Space. The second set of cards, shown in Fig. 13, have marked on one side the words Hazard Cards and on the opposite side Lose Five Points. The third set of cards (Fig. 14) have marked on one side Airport Landing Card and on the opposite side Gain Ten Points.

Preparatory to playing the game the roller at the righthand end of the box as seen in Fig. 4 is turned in a clockwise direction until the starting markers 1, 5, 2, 3, 6 and 4 appear beneath the transparent window next to the lefthand end thereof. Each player then selects a plane of the color he wishes and places it upon one of the starting markers. Thetravel cards are then shuffied and five (5) cards are dealt to each participant. The remainder of these cards are turned upside down and constitute a draw pile. Both the stack of hazard cards and the airport landing cards are also shufiled and placed face down. As the game begins the starting player selects one of his five cards and places it face up alongside the draw pile of the Astron Cards to start a discard pile. He then moves his plane, the map or both his plane and the map according to the directions on the card which he has just played. If the card indicates a plane move and a map move the plane is always moved first. After the player has completed his play he takes a card from the draw pile to replace the card that he has played and his turn ends. Other players follow in turn, playing in a similar manner, first playing to the discard pile, then moving the game piece and finally drawing a new card to complete their hand.

Planes must be moved in accordance with the instructions on the card Astron Cards. In sideway moves-the players have the choice of moving either to the right or to the left. In diagonal moves they have the choice of moving diagonally in any one of the four diagonal directions. In making the moves a player may not land on a space already occupied by another plane but may pass foyer other planes. There must always be one vacant space in front of and behind each plane. Should a plane land on a space directly behind or directly ahead of another plane the plane to the rear must move back one space. If the rear plane should be located on a space'at the back edge of the playing area it is moved one space to the right or to the left at the discretion of the player whose turn it is.

There are eleven (11) Airports colored red and numbered from 1 toll on the playing surface. There are a so twen yne (29) H za d wh ch are marke tar:

nadoes, high winds, mountains and etc. When ever during a game a plane comes to rest on any one of the Airports at the end of any turn, whether on his own turn or whether as a result of a movement of the map by another player, the player owning that plane is entitled to an Airport card. Similarly should a plane come to rest on a hazard space the player owning that plane must take a Hazard card. Both the Airport cards and the Hazard cards are retained until the end of the game and the points, won or lost, should not be disclosed to the other players until the end of the game. Airport and Hazard cards are given out to players Whose planes rest on airports or hazards only at the end of the complete turn. If a plane lands on an airport or a hazard after a move of the plane but is moved off by turning the map on the same turn, the owner does not collect a card. Planes must land on the same airport or hazard more than once but they must either move off or be moved off by the movement of the map between landings in order to get additional cards.

The game ends when the words Game Over appear at the edge of the playing area at the right-hand end of the board, regardless of the positions of the planes at that time. The players Whose turn it is completes his play and all the planes resting on airport or hazard spaces at the completion of that play are given the proper cards. Each player adds up the total number of points on the Airport cards that he has collected and subtracts from them the total number of points on his Hazard cards. The player with the highest net score is the winner.

It should be understood that the present disclosure is for the purpose of illustration only and that this invention includes all modifications and equivalents which fall within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a game, the combination of a flat transparent support constituting a playing surface, said surface being of a predetermined length for supporting several game pieces for movement therealong, a'flexible strip beneath the support, a second flat support beneath the flexible strip spaced from and parallel to the transparent support and forming therewith a longitudinal passage through which the flexible strip may be moved, said second support having contact with the lower surface of the strip and holding it with its upper surface in contact with the underside of the transparent support, spools at the ends of the second support to which end portions of the strip are fastened, a pictorial display on a portion of the strip, said display being of greater length than said predetermined length of the playing surface and constituting a playing field, said display having marked on it start and finish lines, there being enough to the strip at each end end of the pictorial display so that the display portion can be traversed from one roller to the other during the course of the game to move the strip from a position in which the starting line is at the further end of the playing surface at the commencement of the game to a position in which the finish line is at the near end of the playing surface at the end of the game, said strip being divided by spaced parallel, transverse and longitudinally extending lines into unit areas within which game pieces may be placed, game pieces adapted to be placed on the playing surface at places coinciding with a defined area on the playing field therebelow, means for rotating the spools to advance or retract the movable playing field, a hand of cards for each player from which one may be drawn for each play, said cards bearing instructions for moving the game piece along the playing surface and instructions for moving the playing field beneath the playing surface, additional lots of cards bearing points which affect the ultimate score, and indicia on certain of the defined areas of the playing field movable by movement of the strip to move such indicia relative to the game pieces on the support, said indicia when moved beneath a given game piece indicating from which of said additional lots of cards a card is to be drawn for distribution to the player whose game piece is above said indicia.

2. A game comprising in combination, interengageable top and bottom box sections, the top section having a rectangular opening through it, a transparent element fixed to the top section so as to subtend the opening and to form a flat, playing surface of a predetermined length for supporting game pieces for movement thereon, a fiat elevated support substantially shorter in length than the bottom section fixed within the bottom section, the surface of said elevated support being below and parallel to the transparent element in the cover section and forming therewith a longitudinally fiat passage corresponding substantially in length to the transparent element, there being transversely extending pockets at the ends of said elevated support, a flexible web disposed between the supports and being held by the lower support engaged with the upper support, said web being slidable between the supports and visible through the upper support, spools journaled in the pockets at the ends of the bottom section, to which the ends of the Web are connected, a pictorial display on a portion of the web, said display being of greater length than said predetermined length of the transparent playing surface and constituting a playing field, said display having marked on it start and finish line, there being enough of the strip at each end of the pictorial display so that the display portion can be traversed from one roll to the other during the course of the game to move the web to a position in which the starting line is at the further end of the playing surface at the commencement of the game to a position in which the finish line is at the near end of the playing surface at the end of the game, said web being divided by straight parallel, transversely longitudinally extending lines into unit areas in which game pieces may be placed, game pieces adapted to be placed on the playing surface at places coinciding with a defined area on the playing field therebelow, knobs extending from the ends of the spools through the walls of the box sections for rotating the spools to advance or retract the movable playing field, a hand of cards for each player from which one may be drawn for each pla said cards bearing instructions for moving the game pieces along the playing surface and instructions for moving the playing field beneath the playing surface, additional lots of cards bearing points which affect the ultimate score, and indicia on certain of the defined areas of the playing field movable by movement of the web to move such indicia relative to the game pieces on the support, said indicia when moved beneath a given game piece indicating from which said additional lots of cards a card is to be drawn for distribution to the player whose game piece is above said indicia.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,414,788 Parsons May 2, 1922 1,448,201 Cornell Mar. 13, 1923 1,523,976 Meyer Jan. 20, 1925 1,532,069 Ortiz Mar. 31, 1925 1,708,479 Macdonald Apr. 9, 1929 1,928,790 Luhn Oct. 3, 1933 1,957,378 Zimmerman May 1, 1934 2,128,608 Goertemiller Aug. 30, 1938 2,215,352 Flory Sept. 17, 1940 2,221,451 Jones Nov. 12, 1940 2,597,848 Reeser May 27, 1952 2,613,879 Carr Oct. 14, 1952 2,618,429 Donnell Nov. 18, 1952 2,676,701 Scully Apr. 27, 1954 2,709,124 Wales May 24, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS 7,770 Great Britain 1896 198,531 Great Britain June 7, 1923

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3163425 *May 16, 1962Dec 29, 1964Kenneth S CaplanGame board having changeable pattern
US3392460 *Aug 6, 1962Jul 16, 1968Educational Aids Publishing CoCartridge-type teaching device
US3804418 *Jun 15, 1972Apr 16, 1974C SanderMovable game board
US3865380 *Mar 13, 1973Feb 11, 1975Robert L ThomasStock market game
US4588192 *Sep 15, 1983May 13, 1986Pedro LabordeFinancial futures game
US5588654 *Feb 9, 1995Dec 31, 1996Third Quarter CorporationGame playing apparatus
US6431548 *Jul 6, 1999Aug 13, 2002Fundex Games, Ltd.Game playing apparatus
US8590898 *Jun 7, 2012Nov 26, 2013Donald E. BuzaCasino table game
US20120242041 *Jun 7, 2012Sep 27, 2012Buza Donald E BuzaCasino Table Game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/254, 273/286, 40/518, 273/284
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2003/00318, A63F3/00091
European ClassificationA63F3/00A12B