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Publication numberUS2800663 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1957
Filing dateOct 14, 1953
Priority dateOct 14, 1953
Publication numberUS 2800663 A, US 2800663A, US-A-2800663, US2800663 A, US2800663A
InventorsFalk Irving M
Original AssigneeNu Pocket Method Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Garment pocket
US 2800663 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1957 I. M. FALK 2,800,663

GARMENT POCKET Filed Oct. 14, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 F: UE-

1N VENTOR '9 Eg BY m? (J.

ATTORNEY I. M. FALK GARMENT POCKET July 30, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 14, 1953 INVENTOR ATTORNEY GARMENT POCKET nited States Patent C) Irving M. Falk, Philadelphia, Pa., assignor to The Nu Pocket Method Co., Philadelphia, Pa.

2 Claims. (Cl. 2-247) My invention relates to a new and useful garment pocket and more. particularly has to do with. the assembling of a side pocket. in such garments as work and play pants, overalls and the like for use by men, women and children.

This application is a continuation of my application Ser. No. 176,988, filed August 1, 1950-.

An object of this invention is to provide an inexpensive and novel method of assembling bagged pockets in low priced garments such as are used by workingmen in contradistinction to dress garments.

Another object of the invention is to provide a side pocket for work garments in which the entrance or access opening is along one edge of a placket to one side of the pocket at or near the upper end thereof.

A further object of this invention is to secure side edges of the pocket in a seam provided, either between. two contiguous sections or at a placket edge of a garment.

A still further object of the present invention is to combine or interengage parts of a garment and pocket in aunique manner to produce a novelstructure.

With the above and other objects in viewthis invention consists of the details of construction and. combination of elements hereinafter set forth and then designated by the claims.

In order that those. skilled in the art towhich this invention appertains may understand how to make and use or employ the same I will describe its construction in detail, referring by numerals to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, in which:

Figure l is an inside elevational view of a portion. of a pair of pants, intended especially for womens wear, showing my new pocket construction;

Fig. 2 is an outside elevational view of the construction shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken on the line 33 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line 55 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 is an inside elevational view of a portion of a pair of pants of the overall or jumper type, intended especially for mens wear, showing my new pocket construction;

Fig. 7 is an outside elevational view of the construction shown in Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 9 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line 99 of Fig. 7; and

Fig. 10 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line 1010 of Fig. 7.

Referring first to Figs. 1-5, in carrying out my invention as herein embodied represents a pocket produced from a strip of suitable material folded upon itself along a substantially vertical line to provide a fold 16 with the bottom portions of the side edges and the lower edges "ice of the two pocket layers 17 and 18, Fig. 3, coinciding and enclosed in a folded strip or binding 19. The said lower portions of the side edges and said lower edges of the pocket material and the binding are sewn together by the two parallel rows of stitches 20.

The free upper corner of the outer pocket. layer 18 is cut away to provide an oblique edge which will be attached to a wall edge of the pocket opening, to be presently described. A facing strip 21 of garment material, of greater dimensions than the cut away portion of the outer pocket layer, is partially sewn on the inside face of the inner pocket layer 17 by stitches 22 in opposed rela tion to the cut away portion of the pocket layer 18.

As illustrated in Figs. 1, 2V and 3, the reference numerals 23 and 24 represent two contiguous garment sections and one of these, as 23, has the upper corner adjacent the garment section 24 cut away on a generally oblique line to form a substantially diagonal edge which is turned in upon itself to provide the folded finished edge 25.

Prior to the garment sections being joined together the oblique edge of the pocket layer 18 is inserted in the fold of the diagonal edge of the garment section 23 and permanently sewn in place by the stitches 26. Then the garment sections are assembled so that the meeting edge of section 23 and the upper portion of the free side edge of the pocket layer 17, with the facing strip 21, overlap the meeting edge of the garment section 24 and all of the cooperating parts, including both layers of pocket material a short distance below the folded edge: 25-, are sewn together by the stitches 27. Finally, an inside waist band 28.- and a coinciding outside waist band 29 which embrace upper parts of. the pocket and garment sections are sewn in place by the stitches 30 and- 31, the latter, at least, engaging the pocket elements to assist in supporting the pocket.

While the oblique edges of one pocket layer and one garment section are sewn together they are free from other parts so that between the finished diagonal folded edge and the other pocket layer, with the finishing strip: thereon, the pocket opening or entrance 32 is provided.

In. the embodiment of the invention shown in Figs. 61,0-, the reference numerals 33 and 34 represent two contiguous garment sections and one of these, as 33, has the upper corner adjacent the garment section 34 cut away on a generally oblique line to form a substantially diagonal edge which is turned in upon itself to provide the folded finished edge 35 similar to the one previously described except that the edge 35 is shown straight instead of curved.

Before the garment sections are joined together the oblique edge of one pocket layer is inserted in the fold of the diagonal edge of the garment section 33 and permanently sewn in place by stitches 36. Next, the garment sections are assembled so that the meeting edge of garment section 33 overlaps garment section 34 and the two are sewn together between the bottom of the garment and the hip by the stitches 37 leaving an open placket 38 from the hip to the waist line and constituting the pocket opening or entrance which placket may be closed and secured by suitable fastening devices. While buttons and buttonholes are shown as the fastening de vices, hook fasteners or Zippers can be substituted therefor. From the hip to the waist line, or above in some instances, a supporter strip 39 is sewn on the inturned edges of the front garment section and the facing strip 21 by stitches which may be a continuation of the stitches 37. The supporter strip 39 is the equivalent of the part of one of the garment sections previously described and has a similar purpose.

In lieu of the outside waist band a bib member 40 overlaps the upper ends of the garment sections and the exposed part of the facing strip 21 and is sewn in place with an inside waist band 41, the lower edge of which is folded in, by means of stitches 42. The upper two layers of the pocket beyond or forward of the opening, entrance or placket are disposed between the inside waist band 41 and other elements of the garment, such as the bib member and garment section 33.

An important advantage of the new construction will be evident, it is believed, from Figs. 2, 3, 4, 7 and 9. As there shown, the entrance or opening to the pocket, designated 32, is defined by hemmed portions of the fabric which present no abrupt shoulders or transverse edge planes of fabric that would be susceptible to wear from the act of inserting and removing the hand of the wearer, or insertion and removal of anything else. known, pocket openings generally fail in this respect before the material of which the pocket itself is made shows any noticeable wear. As compared with the conventional or best prior art constructions, the new construction As is well 7 reduces the surfaces that are rubbed in use of the pocket and confines these surfaces to locations where such wear as does occur will be largely hidden so that threadbare areas and loose ends of broken thread will not be noticeable to the person wearing the garment or to others. Thus, the edge A in Fig. 4 offers no obstruction to entry or removal of a hand into or from the pocket, nor does the area B in this figure. The same is true of the portions C and D in Fig. 9.

Moreover, the new relationship of the superposed portions of the margins of the inner pocket layer, the facing strip and the rear section of the garment, comprising the edge A in Fig. 4 or C in Fig. 9, forming as they do a shoulder facing to the rear of the garment outside the pocket, disposes the margin of the facing strip in such a way that the facing strip extends in a flat, smooth and uninterrupted plane from the pocket, over the superposed portions, clear up to said shoulder. This eliminates the dust-catching external shoulder that would otherwise be formed facing forwardly, into the pocket. Such a shoulder is objectionable because it collects lint, dust and the like from the pocket and from objects carried in the pocket, from the repeated movement of the wearers hands into and out of the pocket. Such collection soon forms a noticeable line of light color embedded in the shoulder and requiring thorough brushing, if not indeed very strenuous digging, to clean it out. It will be obvious that no such line of dust, lint and the like can form in the present construction because the only external shoulder here involved is one facing out of the pocket, to the rear of the garment, where it cannot catch any dust, lint and the like from the pocket or from objects put into or taken from the pocket. This is regarded as'an important feature of the new construction.

From the foregoing it will be obvious to those skilled in the art of manufacturing work and play pants, overalls, dungarees, jeans and the like that I have provided an exceedingly simple and inexpensive pocket structure and method of attaching the same to garments of the class mentioned.

Having described my invention what I claim as new and useful is:

1. A pocket for pants comprising in combination front and rear garment sections having side edges secured together in overlappingrelation from the bottom of each leg to a location in the region of a hip portion to form a side seam, said garment sections being free and unconnected with each other above the hip portion and the free corner of the front section above the hip portion being folded inwardly to form a turned edge for a pocket opening, a pocket including substantially parallel inner and outer layers having the bottom and front side edges closed, a facing strip secured to the inner pocket layer adjacent the free rear edge of said inner layer with the rear edge of said facing strip folded inwardly over the contiguous free edge of said inner layer, and said facing strip and enclosed edge of the inner pocket layer overlying the edge portion of the rear garment section, the said edge portion of the rear garment section being reversely turned and positioned between folded portions of the inner pocket layer, and a line of stitching extending through the superposed portions of said folded portions of the inner pocket layer, the superposed portions of the front and rear sections and the facing strip, whereby at the region of the pocket said superposed portions of the inner pocket layer, the rear section and the facing strip form a shoulder-facing to the rearof the garment beyond the pocket, with the margin of said facing strip extending in flat, smooth and plane form from within said pocket, over said superposed portions, up to said shoulder.

2. The combination claimed in claim 1, in which said front garment section has its rear edge portion turned forwardly and positioned between the folded-in portions of the facing strip and the rear garment section.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Kotzin Dec. 7, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US763407 *Oct 21, 1903Jun 28, 1904John LandersOveralls.
US2099620 *Sep 28, 1934Nov 16, 1937Albert PleiterGarment
US2209718 *Feb 7, 1936Jul 30, 1940Nu Pocket Method CoPocket construction for trousers
US2262402 *Nov 16, 1940Nov 11, 1941Oppenheimer KleeArticle of apparel
US2455589 *Aug 27, 1945Dec 7, 1948Tobias KotzinTrousers
USRE14135 *Apr 17, 1916May 23, 1916Hamilton CarharttHartt
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5161257 *Mar 13, 1992Nov 10, 1992Stromgren Supports, Inc.Football gridle
US5689836 *Feb 26, 1997Nov 25, 1997Mcdavid Knee Guard, Inc.Athletic protective undergarment
US7828759Apr 9, 2009Nov 9, 2010Arensdorf Stephen CHeel lock ankle support
US8272073Dec 31, 2007Sep 25, 2012Stromgren Athletics, Inc.Athletic protective padding
US8707469 *Jul 8, 2013Apr 29, 2014Ahmad MoghaddasConcealed smartphone pocket
US8745767Mar 10, 2014Jun 10, 2014Ahmad MoghaddasConcealed smartphone pocket
US8745768 *Mar 10, 2014Jun 10, 2014Ahmad MoghaddasConcealed smartphone pocket
US20080222766 *Dec 31, 2007Sep 18, 2008Arensdorf Stephen CAthletic protective padding
US20090270784 *Oct 29, 2009Arensdorf Stephen CHeel lock ankle support
US20110041226 *Feb 24, 2011Arensdorf Stephen CCompression girdle with hamstring support system
US20120311758 *Dec 13, 2012Dollface Designs, LLCGarment having elasticized waistband with pocket
USD646047Dec 9, 2010Oct 4, 2011Arveda, LlcCompression shorts
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/247
International ClassificationA41D27/20
Cooperative ClassificationA41D27/20
European ClassificationA41D27/20