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Publication numberUS2801478 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1957
Filing dateFeb 10, 1956
Priority dateFeb 10, 1956
Publication numberUS 2801478 A, US 2801478A, US-A-2801478, US2801478 A, US2801478A
InventorsGilbert Lowell R
Original AssigneeGilbert Lowell R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Auxiliary soles
US 2801478 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. R- GILBERT AUXILIARY SOLES Filed Feb. 10, 1956 IN V EN TOR.

T R E mn ew R R L m L T A M L United States Patent AUXILIARY SOLES Lowell Gilbert, Estacada, Oreg.

Application February 10; 1956-, Serial-No. 564,818

2 Claims. (Cl. 36--7-.5)

This invention relates to auxiliary soles, and more particularly to soles for covering caulks found on loggers caulk boots, golf shoes, and other special shoes.

The primary object of the invention is to provide an auxiliary sole that can be worn over caulked boots and shoes protecting the surface upon which the wearer walks, such as floor surfaces; and further to protect the caulks from being worn unduly while not being used for the purpose intended.

A further object of this invention is to provide quick detachable means for attaching the auxiliary sole to the soles of regular shoes, particularly caulked boots.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an auxiliary sole that can be worn as a slipper directly on the foot taking the place of other forms of slippers and the like.

A further object of the invention is the provision of an auxiliary resilient sole that can be worn for its cushioning action while standing on concrete floors and the like.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an auxiliary sole that can be worn on regular boots or shoes as an insulating medium protecting the wearer from electrical shocks or the like.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of an auxiliary sole that can be particularly applied to regular boots or shoes for protecting the wearer from wet or cold when walking over wet or cold surfaces.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent in the following specification when considered in the light of the attached drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a conventional boot having the invention secured thereto.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the auxiliary sole removed from the shoe.

Figure 3 is an enlarged vertical sectional view through the auxiliary sole, taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 2, looking in the direction indicated, and including the bottom portion of the boot.

Figure 4 is a bottom plan view of the auxiliary sole.

Figure 5 is a side elevation of the auxiliary sole, partially broken away and in section for convenience of illustration.

Figure 6 is a perspective view of a bridle unit for inter-connecting the fastening bands or laces about the foot of the wearer.

Figure 7 is an end elevation of the bridle shown in Figure 6.

Figure 8 is a plan view of the bridle, partially broken away and in section illustrating how the fastening bands or laces are threaded therethrough.

Figure 9 is a perspective view of a slightly modified bridle for securing the laces or bands together.

Referring now to the drawings in detail wherein like reference numerals indicate like parts throughout the several figures, the reference numeral S indicates generally a one piece auxiliary sole shaped to conform to the sole of the boot B to which it is to be applied. The material from which this sole S is made could be a relatively rigid material, or it could be made of a semi-flexible material, but it should be waterproof to prevent moisture from reaching the bottom of the sole of the boot B when being worn in lieu of rubbers. In most cases this sole S would be made of a non-skid material toprevent slipping.

The preferred form of the invention is constructed with the sole S having on its upper surface V-grooves 15 running transversely thereof adapted to receive the caulks 16 of loggers boots Bor the like. Longitudinal reinforcing ribs 17 extend lengthwise of the sole S to reinforce the same to provide a balance for the material removed from the grooves 15.

Laces 18, preferably of a flexible material, are employed to-secure the auxiliary sole S to the boot B of thewearer, as best illustrated in Figures 1, 2 and 3. Openings 19 are formed adjacent the outer rim 20 of the sole S through which the laces 18 are threaded at a slight angle to the sole S to avoid contacting the sole of the boot B. Grooves 19A are formed between the holes 19 on the bottom of the sole S to embed the laces 18, as best illustrated in Figures 3 and 4.

A brace member 21 extends upwardly from the auxiliary sole S adjacent each opening 19 to tend to prevent the lace 18 from coming inwardly in the way of the boot B when placing the boot B on top of the sole S.

Referring to Figures 6, 7, 8 and 9, the bridle 22 has a hook 23 for receiving the loop 24 of the lace 18 while openings 25, 26 and 27 are adapted to receive the ends 28 and 29 of the laces 18 in the following manner. The laces 18 are threaded through the opening 27 from opposite directions. They are reversed on themselves at 30, passing back through the openings 25 and 26 causing them to bind Within these openings 25 and 26 and against one another at 31. This makes a simple device for holding the ends of the laces 18 in an adjusted position, and as stated above these laces are preferably of a resilient material so as to put a constant tension on the same when threaded through the bridle 22.

The forward loops 32 and 33 are connected together by the bridle 34, as best illustrated in Figure 1. Referring to Figure 2 particularly, the position of the laces 18 before placing them over the top of the boot B will spread away from the sole S by the action of the upwardly extending braces 21 so that the boot B of the wearer can be placed on the auxiliary sole S without being bothered by the laces 18 falling over onto the sole S in the way of the boot B being placed thereon.

It will be noted particularly in Figure 1 that when the laces 18 are adjusted within the bridles 22 and 34 to the proper tension, the laces 18 can be easily removed from over the boot B of the wearer by simply unhooking them out of the hooks 23 of the bridles 22 and 34 leaving the bridles 22 and 34 in an adjusted position.

The auxiliary soles S are well adapted to be worn,

a as stated above, by loggers wearing caulked boots, anyone desiring to eliminate the use of rubbers, used as slippers and in fact the uses of these auxiliary soles S are practically unlimited, but they are primarily intended to be worn with caulk boots wherein the floors are to be protected from the same, also to protect the caulks from injury from cement sidewalks and the like.

Having thus described the preferred embodiments of the invention, it should be understood that numerous other modifications and structural adaptations may be resorted to without departing from the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

I. An auxiliary sole attachment for shoes comprising a sheet of semi-resilient material, a roughened surface on the upper side of said sheet for engagement with a Patented Aug. 6, 1957 shoe sole, a loop of resilient cord having the opposite ends thereof secured to one side of the toe portion of said attachment, a second loop of resilient cord having the opposite end portions thereof secured to the side of the toe portion of said attachment opposite said first loop, a bridle block detachably secured to one of said loops, a hook formed on said bridle block for detachably engaging the other of said loops, said first and second loops being secured together by said bridle block over the toe portion of a shoe, a third loop having the opposite end portions secured to the arch and heel portions respectively of one side of said attachment, a fourth loop having the opposite end portions secured to the arch and heel portions respectively of the opposite side of said sole attachment to said third loop, a bridle block detachably secured to one of said third and fourth loops, and a hook formed on said last named bridle block for detachably engaging the other of said third and fourth loops, said third and fourth loops being secured together by said bridle block over the mid portion of the shoe to which the sole is attached.

2. A device as claimed in claim 1 wherein said first and third loops are continuous and laced through openings in said sole.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US900881 *Jan 20, 1908Oct 13, 1908Emma Reatta ParkerSlipper for bathers.
US1088309 *Feb 27, 1912Feb 24, 1914Richard WeidtSandal.
US1250852 *Oct 8, 1917Dec 18, 1917Isaac GoldstoneSandal.
US2038151 *Jul 23, 1932Apr 21, 1936Wernmark Carl GSandal
US2367092 *Mar 3, 1943Jan 9, 1945Harry BlotnerFootwear
US2372501 *Apr 21, 1944Mar 27, 1945Henry T MarshallAttachment for sport or similar shoes
US2395767 *Nov 4, 1943Feb 26, 1946Herman B DelmanArticle of footwear
US2481610 *May 22, 1944Sep 13, 1949Meighan William ATerminal fitting
US2628437 *Aug 19, 1949Feb 17, 1953Forsythe Edwin CAntislip device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3009269 *Apr 14, 1960Nov 21, 1961Folk James SHouse boot
US3812603 *Oct 9, 1973May 28, 1974Goodman MDetachable spiked shoe protective cover
US3827166 *Dec 26, 1973Aug 6, 1974Goodman MDetachable spiked shoe protective cover
US4258483 *Mar 26, 1979Mar 31, 1981Hogue Amos FProtective device for spiked athletic shoes
US4484398 *Jul 21, 1983Nov 27, 1984Goodwin Boyd GSpiked shoe protector
US5359789 *Sep 14, 1993Nov 1, 1994Michael BellIce gripping sandal for use on other footwear
US5463823 *Apr 25, 1994Nov 7, 1995Bell; MichaelSandal having heel retaining means for use on other footwear
US5467537 *Mar 18, 1994Nov 21, 1995Nike, Inc.Shoe with adjustable closure system
US5533277 *Aug 26, 1994Jul 9, 1996Michael BellFootwear with adherent material release grooves
US5659978 *Apr 9, 1996Aug 26, 1997Michael BellFootwear having a sole with a toe strapping assembly
US5794360 *Mar 7, 1997Aug 18, 1998Michael BellNon-slip sandal for use on other footwear and having strapping means for enabling tightness adjustment and rapid disconnection
US5921005 *Apr 7, 1998Jul 13, 1999Michael BellSelf-adjusting traction-altering attachment device for footwear
US5966840 *Mar 3, 1998Oct 19, 1999Michael BellTraction altering footwear attachment device with resilient mounting ring and fiber ground engagement surface
US7284341Oct 27, 2005Oct 23, 2007Moseley Marshall GSand walking sandal
US7287342Jul 15, 2005Oct 30, 2007The Timberland CompanyShoe with lacing
US7320189Aug 2, 2005Jan 22, 2008The Timberland CompanyShoe with lacing
US7347012Jan 10, 2006Mar 25, 2008The Timberland CompanyShoe with lacing
US7562470Sep 14, 2007Jul 21, 2009The Timberland CompanyShoe with wraparound lacing
US7631440Jun 7, 2006Dec 15, 2009The Timberland CompanyShoe with anatomical protection
US7703218Sep 7, 2006Apr 27, 2010Burgess Richard CTraction device
US7779560 *Jun 27, 2006Aug 24, 2010Cleatskins, Inc.Cleat protector shoe cover
US8656606 *Aug 25, 2011Feb 25, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear including a woven strap system
US20100275462 *Apr 28, 2010Nov 4, 2010Pucci KlaryShoe
US20110302804 *Aug 25, 2011Dec 15, 2011Nike, Inc.Article of Footwear Including A Woven Strap System
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/7.5, 36/11.5, 36/135
International ClassificationA43B5/00, A43B5/18
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/18
European ClassificationA43B5/18