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Publication numberUS2802609 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 13, 1957
Filing dateJan 11, 1954
Priority dateJan 11, 1954
Publication numberUS 2802609 A, US 2802609A, US-A-2802609, US2802609 A, US2802609A
InventorsDonovan Milton D
Original AssigneeDonovan Milton D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pouring attachment
US 2802609 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 13, 1957 M. D. DONOVAN 2,802,609

' v POURING ATTACHMENT I Filed Jan. 11, 1954 2 Sheeis-Sheet 1 IN VEN TOR.

FIG. 2 MQTo/v D. Denver/IN W TTORNEVS Aug. 13, 1957 V M. D. DONOVAN 2,802,609

POUR ING ATTACHMENT Filed Jan. 11, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR. MIL rmv D. Dolvqm N 2,s02,soa POURING ATTACHMENT Milton D. Donovan, Los Gatos, Calif. Application January 11, 1954, Serial No. 493,287 12 Claims. (Cl. 222-570 The present invention relates to a pouring attachment of general utility which is extremely simple in nature, yet possesses a high degree of utility in providing features novel in the art. The invention will be explained in connection with its application to a paint container or pail, it being realized, of course, that the pouring attach ment finds other useful applications. i The attachment in its simplest form comprises a pliable lip of truncated conical appearance having a strengthening ring bounding the minimum-diameter lip section for engagement with the mouth of a container or pail. The ring is further strengthened by a rib extending thereacross in chord fashion. A partitioning rib extends between the strengthening rib and the ring connecting to the latter along the are formed by the strengthening rib.

A pouring attachment in accordance with the instant invention serves the usual purposes of such devices in that the lip or funnel of conical shape provides a return for paint splashed out of the pail during stirring or mixing; the lip increases the effective volume of the pail to permit mixing or thinning in the original container; the device provides, in the form of the strengthening rib, a suitable brush scraper for removing excess paint from the brush; and prevents slopped paint from reaching the sealing grooves in the container top. All of the enumerated features are provided by an attachment of simple and inexpensive character admitting of convenient manufacture by molding from suitable plastic. The pouring attachment can also be fabricated from various materials, such as lightweight metal, oiled paper, fiber, rubber or neoprene, and the like, but it has been found that plastic integral molding provides an economical pouring attachment offering additional features, particularly when the plastic employed sets in a soft or pliable condition. The non-rigid funnel admits of accidental striking without tipping the pail and is generally impervious to sharp impact.

Additionally a device in accordance with the instant invention provides such features as a rest or support for wet paint brushes in the form of the strengthening and partitioning ribs which permit drainage while also servmg to skin the paint as it is poured from the container beneath the strengthening rib. Pouring may also be accomplished through the opposite side of the funnel when the paint is free from skin.

It is known that paint containers produced by various manufacturers have mouths or orifices of slightly diflerent diameter for a given size container. One well known manufacturer provides a quart paint container having an opening measuring three and one-quarter inches in diameter as compared with a diametrical measure of three and thirteen thirty-seconds inches for the mouth of cans produced by another manufacturer. The diameter of the opening is still further varied, generally lying within the range of three and a quarter inches to three and a half inches when other manufacturers are considered. Accordingly, a modification of the invention provides a universal pouring attachment suitable for use with any of the cans presently manufactured. The strengthening ring and lower or minimum-diameter lip section are merely provided with a plurality of spaced apart peripheral grooves having different diameters to accommodate the different diameter beads of the various paint containers, the taper of the lip section conveniently admitting of grooving for this purpose.

Other objects of the instant invention will be apparent to those skilled inthe art from a reading of the following detailed description thereof when taken in the light of the accompanying drawing wherein:

Fig. 1 is a view. in plan of a pouring attachment per se;

Fig. 2 is a view in cross section of the pouring attachment, as seen along the plane indicated by the line 2-2 of Fig. 1, in suitable engagement with a container or paint pail;

Fig. 3 is a view in section similar to that of Fig. 2 showing a universal type attachment accommodating a relative- 1y large-mouthed container; and,

Fig. 4 is a view partly in section and partly in elevation of the universal attachment of Fig. 3 accommodating a paint container having a smaller opening than the container illustrated in Fig. 3.

The pouring attachment shown in Fig. 1 has a conical lip 11 of pliable material which converges into a ring 13 bounding the minimum-diameter lip section. A strengthening rib 15 extends in chord fashion across the ring 13 preferably being formed integrally therewith. As is shown in Fig. 1, the rib 15 is of a length less than a diameter of the ring 13 and is laterally connected to the ring by a partitioning rib 17. Of course, the rib 15 could be diametrically positioned with respect to the ring 13 if desired. The ribs 15 and 17 provide a pair of openings or orifices l9 and 21 through which paint may be poured from a container 23 (Fig. 2). A partitioning rib 17 of a length of approximately one-half inch has been found satisfactory for defining the most generally useful separation of the strengthening rib 15 from the inner periphery of ring 13 for a suitable pouring attachment adaptable to the one-quart paint container. Not only is the paintskinning operation eflected satisfactorily but also the paint brush support formed by the ribs 15 and 17 will accommodate a brush of the ordinary size utilized with such measures. For larger containers the dimensions are usually increased accordingly so that efficient pouring may be had while the skinning operation is preserved.

The ring 13 is generally of channel section along its outer periphery, being recessed between an upper shoulder 25 and a lower flange 27 for abutting engagement with the inner vertical flange 29 of the upper edge structure 31 of the container 23. A further recess 33 is provided in the ring periphery adjacent to the shoulder 25 to accommodate a head or rim 35 of the paint container upper edge structure 31. The flange 27 and recess 33 of the ring 13 cooperate with the container flange 29 and head 35 to provide a locking arrangement for insuring positive location of the pouring attachment relative to the container 23 in fluid-tight relation. The thickened ring 13 is less flexible or pliable than the lip 11 and therefore provides reliable engagement with the container 23 once the ring is forced into position. The strengthening rib 15, further stiffened by the partitioning rib 17, augments the locking action. Of course, the attachment may be removed as desired for future use, the pliability remaining in spite of cleaning, continued use, or intervals of storage.

The universal attachment shown in Figs. 3 and 4-may conveniently be considered the same as the attachment of Fig. 2 with the lower half of the ring 13 of the structure of Fig. 2 being removed and an additional groove 51 (Fig. 4) beingv provided near the truncated end of the pliable lip 11. The foregoing suggested conversion does not, of course, represent the best mode of manufacture of the universal model but is merely presented to reveal the relatively minor changes necessary to convert the attachment of Fig.2 to the universal typenrodel. The most convenient mannerof producingeither type attachment is by molding, the plastic requiring only about ten to fifteen seconds to set or harden then enabling removal from the mold for minor trimming operations. The use of a multiple mold permits a single operator to produce a large quantity of such attachments during a single working day,-the cost of the raw material being practically negligible.

The lower groove 33' of the universal attachment corresponds to the groove 33of the attachment of Fig. 2, being peripherally located with respect-to the stiffening ring 13'. In Fig. 4the groove 33accommodates the head 35' of a can 23' of the same size and shape, for-example, as the can 23 of'Fig. 2. The lower "portion of the ring 13' preferably abuts the container flange 29 in order to assure 'a positive grippingaction. It should be pointed out that the ring 13' of the universal type attachment can correspondprecisely to the ring 13 of the attachment of Fig. .2, i. e., be provided with a bottom flange similar to the flange 27 illustrated in: Fig. 2 adapted to extend beneath the container vertical flange 29 but it has been found that the structure of' Fig. 4 enables a gripping action suflicient to'permit thecontainer actually to be lifted bymeans of the attachment, which gripping action is, of course, all that is ever required of a paint pailattachment.

In Fig. 3 the universal attachment is employed with a container 23" of the same capacity as the containers 23 and 23 but one manufactured with a larger orifice or opening as defined by the bead 35". The attachment is merely forced further into the can to allow the bead 35" to seat within the groove 51, the shoulder 53 of the attachment which separates the grooves 51 and 33' being preferably adapted for abutment with the vertical flange 29" of the .container 23". The lip 11' may be provided with a plurality of grooves of increasing diameter located in spaced apart relation upwardly of the groove 51 respectively to accommodate the multiplicity of different size containers manufactured.

'Like the attachment of Fig. 2 the universal type attachment forming the modification of the invention illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4 provides reliable engagement with either the container 23 or 23" since the ring 13' and the .base portion of the lip 11 are thickened and consequently 'less flexible or pliable than the lip in general. The strengthening rib 15' is further stiffened by the partitioning rib 17' to augment the locking action. Also, the universal attachment admits of detachment from cans without damage to enable repeated usage thereof.

Havingnow described the invention, what is claimed is:

1. A pouring attachment adapted to grip the open mouth of a container to provide a fluid-tight relation therewith comprising a pliable funnel for location .relative to the container mouth to extend upwardly of the container, the funnel terminating atone end in a ring to form the base of the funnel adapted to fit within the container mouth, a strengthening rib means of length less than the diameter of the ring disposed across the ring in chord fashion to partition the funnel and a partitioning rib extending normal to the strengthening rib and between it and the nearest portion of the ring.

2., A pouring attachment for a container having an opening defined by a vertical flange provided with an upper bead, comprising, a pliable funnel for location relative to the container opening to extend upwardly of the container, the base of the pliable funnel being of ring formation and adapted to fit the container opening, said ring having a substantially U-shaped peripheral recess to accommodate the vertical flange of the container, said ring having a further peripheral recess within the U-shaped recess to accommodate the container bead, and rib means 4 disposed across the ring in chord fashion to partition the funnel.

3. A pouring attachment for a container having an opening defined by a vertical flange provided with an upper bead, comprising, a pliable funnel for location relative to the container opening to extend upwardly of the container, the funnel base being of ring configuration and adapted to fit the container opening, said ring having a substantially channel section for abutting engagement with the vertical flange of the container, and a peripheral recess within the channel to accommodate the container bead, and strengthening rib means disposed across the ring in chord fashion to partition the funnel.

4. A pouring attachmentfor paint containers adapted to grip the mouth of the container in fluid-tight relation and extend upwardly thereof, comprising, a pliable lip of truncated conical appearance, the said lip terminating in a strengthening ring at the end of the lip of least diameter for engaging the. mouth of the container, a strengthening rib extending. across the ring in chord fashion, and a partitioningrib substantially diametrically located with respect to the ring and connecting the strengthening rib with the shorter arc portion of the ring as defined by the strengthening rib.

5. A pouring attachment for paint containers adapted to grip the mouth of a container in fluid-tight relation and extend upwardly thereof, comprising, a pliable -lip of truncated conical appearance terminating in a strengthening ring of substantially channel section at the end of the lip of least diameter for engaging the mouth of the container, a strengthening rib extending across the ring in chord fashion, and partitioning rib means extending from the ring to the strengthening rib in the region bounded by the shorter arc portion of the ring and the strengthening rib.

6. A pouring attachment-for a paint container having an opening defined by a vertical flange provided with an upper peripheral bead, comprising, a pliable lip of truncated conical appearance, a strengthening ring of substantially channel section bounding the end of the lip of least diameter adapted to abut the vertical flange of the container, said ring having a peripheral recess within the channel section for accommodating the container bead, a strengthening rib extending across the ring in chord fashion, and a partitioning rib substantially diametrically located with respect to the ring and connecting the strengthening rib with the shorter arc portion of the ring as defined by the strengthening rib.

7. A pouring attachment for securement to a container by fluid-tight gripping of the container mouth and arranged to extend outwardly therefrom, comprising, a pliable lip of truncated conical appearance, a strengthening ring bounding the minimum-diameter lip section for engagement with the mouth of the container, a strengthening rib extending across the ring as a chord of alength less than the ring diameter, .and partitioningrib means extending between the circumference of the ring and the strengthening rib.

8. A pouring attachment for securement to a container .by fluid-tight gripping of the containenmouth and arranged to extend outwardly therefrom, comprising, a pliable lip of truncated conical appearance, a pliable strengthening ring bounding the minimum-diameter lip section for engagement with the mouth of the container, a strengthening rib extending across the ring'asgachord .of a length less than the ring diameter, and partitioning rib means extending between the circumference "of the ring and the strengthening rib and joining the rib at substantiallya right angle.

9. Apouring attachment for securement toa container by fluid-tight gripping of the container mouth and arranged to extend outwardly therefrom, comprising, a pliable lip of truncated conical appearance terminating at one end in a strengthening ringzbounding-the minimumdiameter lip section for engagement with :the.:mouth .of

the container, a strengthening rib extending across the ring as a chord of a length less than the ring diameter, and a partitioning rib extending between the circumference of the ring and the strengthening rib of a length less than the ring radius.

10. A pouring attachment adapted to grip the open mouth of a container to provide a fluid-tight relation therewith comprising a pliable funnel for location relative to the container mouth to extend upwardly of the container, the pliable funnel terminating in one direction in a ring to form the base of the funnel and being adapted to fit within the container mouth, said ring and portion of the funnel adjacent the ring having peripheral grooves, and rib means disposed across'the ring in chord fashion to partition the ring.

11. A pouring attachment for paint containers adapted to grip the mouth of a container in fluid-tight relation and extend upwardly thereof, comprising, a pliable lip of truncated conical appearance, a strengthening ring bounding the end of the lip of least diameter for insertion within the container mouth, said ring and lip having spaced apart peripheral grooves, a strengthening rib extending 6 across the ring in chord fashion, and a partitioning rib between the strengthening rib and ring.

12. A universal pouring attachment for paint containers having peripheral beads about the mouths thereof respectively of different diameters, comprising, a pliable lip of truncated conical appearance of increasing thickness in the direction of the apex, a strengthening ring bounding the end of the lip of least diameter, said ring and lip having a plurality of spaced apart peripheral grooves respectively adapted to receive container beads of different diameters to locate the attachment in fluid-tight relation with the container accommodated, and a partitioning rib extending between the circumference of the ring and the strengthening rib.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,564,979 Jorgensen Aug. 21, 1951 2,570,426 Cassidy Oct. 9, 1951 2,627,367 Bork Feb. 3, 1953 2,722,347 Henke Nov. 1, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2564979 *Jun 28, 1948Aug 21, 1951Jorgensen David FPaint can attachment
US2570426 *Oct 7, 1948Oct 9, 1951Cassidy William WPouring attachment for paint cans
US2627367 *Dec 6, 1950Feb 3, 1953Bork William FDetachable can spout
US2722347 *Mar 6, 1951Nov 1, 1955Joseph L SwitzerContainer rim guard and pouring device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2981449 *Oct 31, 1957Apr 25, 1961Rutland Fire Clay CompanyCaulking compound cartridge with improved spout
US2993629 *Aug 7, 1957Jul 25, 1961Hill Shaw CompanyDetachable pouring spout and gasket assembly for coffee maker bowl
US3014621 *Apr 26, 1957Dec 26, 1961Fred PovitzAttachment for beverage containers
US3133668 *Nov 13, 1962May 19, 1964Heise Arthur C AShelf-type attachment for paint cans
US3182841 *Oct 1, 1962May 11, 1965Pet Milk CompanySnap-on lid for baby food containers
US3248231 *Jan 4, 1963Apr 26, 1966Pet Milk CompanyDisposable infant nurser package and method of making same
US3252635 *Sep 8, 1964May 24, 1966Rosenhan Cort AExtension collar for liquid containers such as paint cans
US3273746 *Jun 2, 1964Sep 20, 1966Andrews Jr Harold DPaint can bib
US3463366 *Jan 24, 1968Aug 26, 1969Spencer Francis DPaint can attachment ring with pouring lip
US4583666 *Apr 9, 1984Apr 22, 1986Buck Donald CContainer attachment
US5137188 *Oct 3, 1990Aug 11, 1992Thompson Terry APouring extension for cans
US5213239 *Dec 26, 1991May 25, 1993Salvatore MacalusoNo splatter no mess spout for a paintcan
US5732851 *Mar 29, 1996Mar 31, 1998Griffin; Patrick J.Detachable beverage can attachment
US6296158 *Dec 3, 1999Oct 2, 2001Lin ZhouDisposable spout for cans
US9079453 *Sep 17, 2009Jul 14, 2015Grant CoxContainer holder having rotatable circular joint
US20020015357 *Jul 16, 2001Feb 7, 2002Roland LangevinSplatter shield
US20050218166 *Jun 20, 2003Oct 6, 2005Mehan Terrence JDispenser device
US20090236345 *Jun 11, 2007Sep 24, 2009Mack-Robles Nancy MTrash Receptacle With Dispensable Bags
USD741025 *Aug 18, 2014Oct 13, 2015Gary RossPortable water travel mug for dogs
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/570, 220/697, 220/701
International ClassificationB65D25/48, B65D25/38
Cooperative ClassificationB65D25/48
European ClassificationB65D25/48