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Publication numberUS2803096 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 20, 1957
Filing dateNov 30, 1954
Priority dateNov 30, 1954
Publication numberUS 2803096 A, US 2803096A, US-A-2803096, US2803096 A, US2803096A
InventorsMockiewicz Sylvester C
Original AssigneeAmerican Buff Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Buffing wheel
US 2803096 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States BUF F IN G WHEEL Sylvester C. Mockiewicz, Chicago,.Ill.-, .assignor to American Buti Company, Chicago, lll.; a corporation of Illinois Application November 3,0, 1954, Serial vNo'.4'72,097

Claims. (Cl. 51-193) This invention relates to bufling wheels and vmore particularly to an improved buiing wheel yconstructed of a plurality of radial units or ngers having combined 'cloth and sisal laminations.

In general, metal products must be-preparedfor'plat` ing or finishing by rst polishing the article to'remove heavy burs andl smooththe metal finish, after which a buing wheel is employed to provide a luster on the surface and to remove anyv slight imperfections therein.

Buing wheels have heretofore been constructed primarily. Such material is soft'and is1 of a cotton cloth material. usuallyy employed as a vehicle for a bufng compound which performs the cutting and buing operation'. It has been proposed that a buing wheel be constructed of a coarse material such as sisal to provide a harder, more rapid cutting operation.

lar structure to which a bung compound may be applied. Such buffs have characteristics of high cutting speed and long life, but are frequently unable to impart to thev proved butf combining the desirable features of a cloth' buif and a sisal buff;

It is still' another object of this inventionzto'` provide;

an improved buff having a high degree of flexibility Whereby it is adapted for use on irregular and` contoured surfaces.

lt is still another object of this invention to provide a buff having a plurality of unitary fingers radially clis't posed in such a manner that the resulting buff.. is capable of substantial flexibility and cool operation.-

lt is a further object of this invention toprovidetan fingers each having a coarse core portion and a soft peripheral portion.

It is still another object of this invention to provide an improved buff in which the materials employed therein are formed into finger-like units extending radially from the buff center,` each of said units including cloth andil sisal laminations positioned whereby the work engaging t surface thereof is'on a biaswith respect to the `weave of said materials.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide an improved unit buff which may either be ofv the center+` less variety or have a permanent center secured thereto:

Further and additional objects of this invention will n become obvious from a consideration of this specification, the accompanying drawings and the appended claims.- ln one form of this invention a plurality of; umts :orf:

Wheels formed of the sisal type: of material have been constructed in which a plurality of` annular discs are cut and sewn'into an integral hard annu arent O ,5h and the Woof fibers.

2,803,096 Patented ug. 20,1957

"ice

igers are formed` by the interfoldingof laminations of cottonand'sisal fabric/in such a manner* that the cotton completely surrounds the sisal fabric and both of said vfabrics arecut on the bias whereby the work engaging edges thereof compriseber ends of bothcthei warp bers A plurality of such units are as'- sembled in a circularconguration, eachcof said units extending radially from the buff center.

For a more complete understanding of this invention ftrefer'encewill now be made to the accompanying drawings;

whereine.

invention with one unitremoved therefrom;

Fig. 2 is ,a partial sectional view of the embodiment of Fig. l taken on the line 2--2 thereof;

Fig.: 3 is a partial enlarged view of one of the units of 'the embodiment of Fig'. 1;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view illustrating the disposition of'ethewariousY laminationseofV sisal in onev unit oftheH embodiment of Fig. 1;

FigsSi's/a sectional viewillustrating the combined'laininations of the `cloth and sisal fabrics included in a single unit in the' embodiment of Fig. 1 and takenon the line 5:-51of'Fig: 3;

Fig;1 6v illustrates the manner inV which the plurality of units ,are assembled'into a single-integralk construction during manufacture; and

Fig. v7fdiagrammatically 'illustrates'the' weave of thesisal". Ilarninati'onsM and its': angular ldisposition with respect" Referring now to" the drawings and more particularly vutozFig; 1, a ybutt 410 is illustrated incorporating the teach- '55 improved buit utilizing a plurality of radially extending.-

clamping ring118-between the two fingers of the folded' unit's"'12'. The unit 12a having ngers 22 and 24 xis illus# tratedas removed from'th'e entire group tov better illustrate4the mannerinwhich thevarious units are constructed and assembled. y

Th'e'preliminary assembly of the units 12`on the fabric strip 20iis shown clearly in Fig. 6. The units'12'are cut to-ilength and positionedfin side by side relationship.v

Tlierfabric` strip 20 is then placed transversely of the units'l 12'along the centers thereof, and the strip 20 and units -12 -are secured together by stitching 26. A suflicient number of units are-assembled in this manner to iill'theentire periphery of the clamping ring 18. The unitsare'then placed on the ring 18' and the clamping lugs; shaped into place, whereby the vfingers 22 and 24 arefforced 'outwardly in'sideA by side relationship. The lugsg16: 'of the metal clamping ring 18 are closed torigidly` engage thecentral portion of the units 12 with the annular fabric strip 20 centrallyV disposed whereby an integral assembly is formed. The metal center 28', illustrated in Fig.v l, may then be inserted if desired. A pluralityA of lips 30 extending outwardly from the periphery of'thecenter 28 are formed parallel. to the axis of the butfand, upon being positioned as illustrated inFig. l,

these lipsV are formed-outwardly to engage the clamping ring 18,` making the center 28 an integral part of the buff structure.Y The manner in which` the lips 30 ofthe centerf28-engage1the clamping-ring 18 is clearly shown in the sectional view of Fig. 2.

Alsofclearly.v shown in-Fig. 2 is the manner in which the. :fabric strip 20 isl secured 'to` the central portion'vr 14 offeach-ot the units 12. In addition to the stitching 26,

,which forms the original set of -unitsillustrated in Fig. :6;'1

the units may be secured by stitching 32 to insure the side by side relationship of the lingers 22 and 24.

The construction of each individual unit is an important part of this invention. To provide the desired deterials may be employed in the described embodiment. Sisal in this application is used in its broad sense to include many types of sisal, hemp, burlap, and the like. The following table will indicate certain coarse fibers, all

gree of iiexibility and controlled metal cutting, the units of which are well adapted to use in the above described are constructed as illustrated in Figs. 3, 4 and 5. As invention:

Fiber Trade Name of Cloth Botanical Name Origin of Fiber Country Producing Cloth 1. Henequen Sisal or Henequen.. Agavefourcroydes Mexico (and Cuba) MexicoA l 2. Sisal Sisal Agfwe ssalana Dominican Republic, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Haiti,

Kenya, Tanganyika, England, S. Africa, Vene- Uganda, So. American zuela. Countries. 3. Cannabis sativa Itzymend Yugoslavia and Italy.

e 4. Neoglazom'a variegata Brazil Brazil. 5, Istle (or Ixtle, Palma, Pita, Tula, Yucca carenosana, Agave Mexico Mexico.

Jaumave). loplumtha var. Poselgaerz'. l 6. Manila Hemp or Abaca Manila Hemp or Musa teztls Phllippine Islands, Su- Phillppme Islands, Japan,

Abaca. matra, Borneo, Central etal.

America. 7. Flax Linen Limrm ustctiasimum Holland lellgium, Peru, Various.

e an e a Y 8. Burlap (Hessian) Corcharua capsularia and India, Pakistan India, Pakistan, U. K.,

coz-chorus oltoria. U. S. A., Various European Countries.

illustrated in Fig. 4, an elongate strip 36 of sisal is cut on the bias and folded to form a core for a unit having four overlying laminations 37, 38, 39 and 40. A fabric cover 34 completely surrounds the sisal core 36 and no free ends of either the fabric or sisal portions are externally exposed as shown in Fig. 5. A single soft fabric sheet surrounds the sisal core 36 and extends into the central portion thereof between the sisal laminations 37 and 39 to insure complete enclosure of the sisal core and also the internal disposition of the soft fabric edges.

The sequence of steps by which the unit is constructed is apparent from the cross-sectional configuration of the unit 12, as illustrated in Fig. 5. The sisal core is first folded along the bight portion 42 and then completely surrounded by the soft fabric cover 34. The assembly of sisal and fabric is subsequently folded along the bight portion 44 to form the nished unit of the desired width and thickness with the sisal laminations 37, 38, 39 and 40 and free edges of the soft fabric cover 34 completely enclosed by the soft fabric. Stitching 46 is longitudinally applied to the units to maintain the laminar construction and to insure a tightly formed assembly having the desired characteristics of iiexibility, softness and cutting ability.

It is important in this invention that the laminations of each unit be so disposed that the work engaging edges thereof are bias edges of the sisal and soft fabrics. A typical sisal fabric is illustrated in Fig. 7. Therein it can be seen that both the Woof fibers 48 and warp fibers 50 are disposed at a substantial angle to the work engaging surface 52. This produces several important advantages. The abilityA of the sisal fabric to hold together in use is accordingly increased and the detrimental effects of centrifugal force minimized. Furthermore the ends of the warp and woof fibers have excellent cutting characteristics and an ability to absorb large amounts of buliing compound. Therefore the efficiency and life of the buff is increased by the use of a biased construction.

The utilization of a unit construction provides excellent iiexibility as each individual finger is free to shift in accordance with the forces acting thereon and to conform to any unusual shape or contour. Also, as already indicated, the bias sisal portion of the buff described has excellent cutting characteristics and in many instances the use of this compound buff will eliminate the customary initial polishing operation. The outer cotton cover on each unit provides a soft work engaging surface which will impart the desired color and luster to the finished product.

While the terms sisal and cotton have been used herein to indicate the distinction between the coarse internal fabric and the soft cover laminations, it is believed clear from this description that various substitute ma- Without further elaboration, the foregoing will so fully explain the character of my invention that others may, by applying current knowledge, readily adapt the same for use under varying conditions Vof service, while retaining certain features which may properly be said to constitute the essential items of novelty involved, which items are intended to be defined and secured to me by the following claims.

I claim:

l. In a buing wheel having a plurality of radially extending bufiing fingers, the improvement which comprises constructing each finger of an elongate strip of coarsely woven sisal fabric, said strip being cut on the bias and longitudinally folded to form a core, a tightly woven soft fabric cover, said cover being cut on the bias and transversely enfolded around the sisal core, said enfolded core and cover being longitudinally folded along a central bight portion in such a manner that all longitudinal edges of both the soft fabric and sisal fabric are internally disposed, said finger being longitudinally stitched to maintain said sisal core and said soft cover in juxtaposed integral relationship.

2. In a bufling wheel having a plurality of radially extending fabric bufling fingers, the improved process for making one of said bufting lingers which comprises cutting an elongate strip of sisal on the bias, longitudinally folding said strip along a central bight portion to form a core, completely surrounding the folded core by a soft fabric cover, longitudinally folding the assembly of sisal and soft fabric along a central bight portion, and longitudinally stitching the folded assembly to maintain said sisal and soft fabric in a tight laminar construction.

3. In a bufing wheel, the improvement which comprises a plurality of radially extending bufiing fingers, each finger constructed of an elongated strip of coarsely woven sisal fabric, said strip being cut on the bias and longitudinally folded to form a core, a tightly woven soft fabric, cover, said cover being cut on the bias and transversely enfolded to enclose the sisal core, said enfolded core and cover being longitudinally folded along a central bight portion in such a manner that'all longitudinal edges of both the soft fabric and sisal fabric are internally disposed, said finger being longitudinally stitched to maintain said sisal core and said soft cover in juxtaposed integral relationship.

4. In a bufling wheel, a central circular rigid supporting ring, and a plurality of radially extending bufng fingers, each finger constructed of an elongate strip of coarsely Woven sisal fabric, said strip being cut on the bias and longitudinally folded to form a core, a tightly wovenA soft fabric cover, said cover being cut on the bias and transversely enfolded to enclose the sisal core,

said enfolded core and cover being longitudinally folded along a central bight portion in such a manner that all longitudinal edges of both the soft fabric and sisal fabric are internally disposed, said iinger being longitudinally stitched to maintain said sisal core and said soft cover in juxtaposed integral relationship.

5. In a buing wheel, a central circular rigid supporting ring, and a plurality of fabric buiing fingers extending from said ring, each of said fingers comprising a web of coarsely woven sisal and a tightly woven soft fabric 10 coextensive with and enclosing said sisal web to form a unit, said unit being folded along a central longitudinal axis whereby all longitudinal edges of both said sisal web and said soft fabric are internally disposed,

6 vtain said web and said fabric in juxtaposed integral relationship.

References Cited in the iile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,090,814 Seybert Aug. 24 1937 2,108,985 Hague Feb. 22, 1938 2,134,676 Sommers Oct. 25, 1938 2,146,284 Churchill Feb. 7, 1939 2,333,785 Harrison Nov. 9, 1943 2,483,879 Churchill Oct. 4, 1949 2,489,193 Mockiewicz Ngy. 22, 1949 2,642,706 Davies June 23, 1953 said folded fingers being stitched longitudinally to main- 15

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2090814 *Apr 30, 1936Aug 24, 1937Herman SeybertBuffing wheel
US2108985 *Dec 2, 1936Feb 22, 1938Hanson Van Winkle Munning CoFibrous buff
US2134676 *Oct 25, 1937Oct 25, 1938Lustre CompanyEdge buffing wheel
US2146284 *Mar 19, 1937Feb 7, 1939Churchill George RRotary buffing device
US2333785 *Mar 1, 1943Nov 9, 1943Buff Service & Supply CoBuffing and polishing implement
US2483879 *Apr 29, 1948Oct 4, 1949George R ChurchillBuffing wheel
US2489193 *Mar 27, 1948Nov 22, 1949American Buff CompanyProcess of making buffing wheels
US2642706 *Feb 24, 1950Jun 23, 1953Davies Joseph RBias sisal buff
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2885834 *Jun 27, 1957May 12, 1959F L & J C Codman CompanyBuffing wheel
US3023549 *Mar 10, 1958Mar 6, 1962George R Churchill Company IncBuffing wheel
US3026654 *Feb 17, 1960Mar 27, 1962Petersen Charles JBuffing wheel
US3438080 *Apr 27, 1967Apr 15, 1969Jackson Buff CorpCombined soft cloth and hard coarse cord buff
US5175900 *Jun 24, 1991Jan 5, 1993Areway, Inc.Automatic index rotary buffing apparatus
US5247767 *Jun 24, 1991Sep 28, 1993Areway, Inc.Non-directional buffing wheel
US5699579 *Jun 7, 1996Dec 23, 1997Burger; JoergDevice for washing vehicles
US5938515 *Dec 1, 1997Aug 17, 1999Lake Country Manufacturing, Inc.Foam buffing pad of string-like construction
US6001009 *Apr 21, 1998Dec 14, 1999Lake Country Manufacturing Inc.Foam buffing pad of individual string-like members and method of manufacture thereof
US6312485 *Jun 14, 1999Nov 6, 2001Lake Country Manufacturing, Inc.Method of manufacturing a foam buffing pad of string-like members
DE3014159A1 *Apr 12, 1980Dec 11, 1980Heidenau Netz & Seil VebPolierscheibe
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/230.14
International ClassificationB24D13/04, B24D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationB24D13/045
European ClassificationB24D13/04B