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Publication numberUS2803839 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 27, 1957
Filing dateNov 5, 1954
Priority dateNov 5, 1954
Publication numberUS 2803839 A, US 2803839A, US-A-2803839, US2803839 A, US2803839A
InventorsZack T Mosley
Original AssigneeZack T Mosley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Buoyant chair
US 2803839 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 27, 1957 2. T. MOSLEY BUOYANT CHAIR Filed NOV. 5, 1954 ulu I. sig

United 6 ,16 fi o This invention relates broadly to theart of buoyant chairs adapted to support an dccupantupon-the water and in its more specific aspects it relates to suchbuoyant.

chairs which are of light weightcons'truction, are collapsible when not in use and support the occupant in a comfortable semireclining position; and nature and objects of the invention will be readily recogniaed and understood by those skilled in the arts 'to w hich it relatesin the light of the following explanatiom andlf descrip-' tion of the accompanying drawings illustrating what I at present believe to be the preferredfembodimems or mechanical expressions of my invention from amongvarious other forms,arrangements combinations,and constructions, of which the inventionf capable. within the spirit and scope thereof. ;:;t f

With the number of swimming increasing there is an unfilled demand for aichair which will comfortably support an occupant in a stea dy condition upon the surface of the water, wherein. portions of the occupant.s body submerged in the water so that he will thereby be cooledfand refreshed as he comfortably floats upon-the surface of. the water.;.

I have provided such a buoyant chaii'jwhich is; of light weight construction so that it may he easily transported to and from swimming pools or otherbpdies of water in which people swim and bathe. meme; to further facilitate the portable characteristics of my invention 1 have constructed it so that it may be easily and quickly disassembled and collapsed for- .easy "transportation and storage.

The buoyant chair of this invention consists generally of a flexible inflatable buoyancy member with which is combined a light weight basic framework or supporting structure for the buoyancy member whereby I endow the buoyancy member with characteristics which produce a chair which will float on the surface of the water in a 2,803,839 Patented Aug. 27, 1957 My invention also embodies self propulsion means removably connected with the chair so that the occupant thereof may easily propel the chair across the surface of the water and I have also provided means on the chair for increasing the comfort and relaxation of the occupant of the chair whereby he may conveniently smoke or have a suitable support for a beverage or the like glass. In attaining the aforesaid construction whereby many advantageous results are obtained I have not evolved a chair which is expensive to produce, instead I have provided a buoyant chair which will be durable under normal conditions of use and which may be economically produced.

With the foregoing general objects, features and results in view, as well as certain others which will be apparent.

from the following explanation, the invention consists in certain novel features in design, constructiom-mounting and combination of elements, as will be more fully and particularly referred to and specified hereinafter.

Referring to the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is a view in perspective of the buoyant chair in operative position ready to support an occupant on the surface of the water.

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a view in perspective of the buoyant chair in collapsed position with the buoyant member, and the accessories removed from the basic framework.

work of my buoyant chair. This basic framework comprises a back section designated generally by the numeral 3 and a seat forming section designated generally by the numeral 5. The back and seat forming sections 3 and 5 steady condition and on an even keel]? This combination of the buoyancy member with a basic supporting framework overcomes the disadvantage which is inherent in buoyancy members per se when attempts are made to rest ones body thereon. Heretofore such members when a person attempted to float comfortably upon them would not remain steady and wouldassume various awkward positions so that the person attempting to float upon the member would either slide therefrom or would constantly be straining to remain inposition being supported by the buoyancy member. I have not onlyprovided this comwater. In furthering this relaxing characteristic of my invention I have associated the buoyancy member with the basic framework therefor in suchmanner that certain sections of the buoyant member function in eflect as cushions for' the occupant supporting members.

are each preferably formed of light weight aluminum alloy tubes of approximately 1" diameter and the aluminum tubing forming the back section 3 is bent to provide a pair of transversely spaced leg elements 7 and 9 which are connected at their upper ends by a transverse connecting or headrest member 11 and the tubing forming the seat section is bent to provide a pair of transversely spaced leg elements 13 and 15 which are connected together at their lower ends by a transverse connecting or foot member .17. It is preferable though not necessary that the leg elements 13 and 15 be of'greater length than leg elements 7 and 9. The back and seat sections of the basic framework are hingedly connected together at the free ends of the legs of each section by means of tension hinges 17, the leaves of each hinge being bolted, riveted, or otherwise fixedly attached to the end portions of the complementary two legs of the two sections. The hinges may be provided with any suitable spring or tension means in order to constantly bias the back and seat portions into operative occupant supporting position as particularly illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings. The hinges 17 when in fully open position as illustrated in the previously mentioned two views of the drawings maintain the back and seat portions of the basic framework in angular relation so that the included angle between the legs 9 and 15 and 7 and 13 will preferably be greater than and less than It will be evident from consideration of the drawings that the basic framework comprising the back and seat sections 3 and 5 when inoperative fully spread apart position provides a generally rectangular framework of aluminum tubing or other suitable material having the necessary weight and rigidity characteristics, and it will also be appreciated that the angular relationship of the sections of this framework may be described as being more or less similar to the angular relaof the as we'll as buoyant tionship of the back and seat sections of a reclining chair. The basic framework may be of a length on the order of 7 ft. from top of the headrest to the foot of the framework. It will of course be recognized that the dimensions of the framework, the angular relations of the two sections thereof and the type and size of tubing may be varied and still fall within the spirit and scope of my invention.

In order to. provide the buoyant characteristics to the basic framework and for other reasons which will become apparent as the description of my invention proceeds I provide a generally rectangular flexible and resilient buoyant tube which I have designated in its entirety by the numeral 21. I have found that'a successful and advantageous buoyant tube which is impervit us to air and water may be formed of plastic or rubber to provide a generally rectangular tube of approximately 5 in. to 7 in. in

' diameter and of approximately 9 ft. in circumference. The

buoyant tube 21'isconstructed to provide longitudinally extending arm members 23 and 25 which are connected together and are preferably in communication with each other at their upper ends by means of a transverse upper member 27 and at their lower ends are connected together and in communication with each other by means of a transverse lower member 29. The buoyant tube 21 may be provided with a conventional inflation and deflation valve 31.

The buoyant tube may be of approximately the same transverse dimension as. the transverse dimension of the basic framework, however its length or longitudinal dimension is preferably reduced relative to the same dimension of the basic framework when the basic framework is in open operative position as illustrated in Fig. l of the drawings. The buoyant tube is adapted to be removably fastened to the basic framework to extend from the end of the seat section thereof to points on the back section thereof which are downwardly spaced relative to the transverse connecting or head-rest member 11 of the back section 3 of sthe basic framework. When the buoyant tube is removably connected to the basic framework it rests thereon and is steadied and a degree of rigidity is imparted thereto by the framework and the longitudinal arm members 23 and 25 of the buoyant tube extend from the points of attachment of the tube to the framework and bridge portions of the legs of each section of the basic framework. As will become apparent as this description is proceeded with the buoyant tube arm members 23 and 25 function not only as buoyancy producing members but also as arm rests for the occupant of the chair to add to his comfort and relaxation. At or adjacent to each corner of the seat section 5 of the basic framework I fix plastic, fiber or the like straps 33 to the aluminum tubing of the basic framework and each such strap includes a buckle or other suitable fastening means 35. The straps 33 may be firmly fastened to the aluminum tubing of the basic framework in any suitable manner such as with metal screws, rivets, or bolts 37. In affixing the buoyant tube 21 to the'basic framework the transverse connecting member 29 of the buoyant tube is positioned in abutment with the transverse connecting or foot member 17 of the seat section 5 of the basic framework and the straps 35 are looped about the corners of the buoyant tube and buckled to fasten that end of the buoyant tube in operative position on and relative to the basic framework. I provide further straps 39 having buckles or the like 41, these straps and buckles being similar to the aforesaid straps 33. Each strap 39 is fixed in any suitable manner as by metal screws, rivets, or bolts 43 to each leg 7 and 9 of the back section 3 of the basic framework and each strap 39 is fixed on its respective legs 7 or 9 at a position thereon removed from the transverse connecting member 11. The buoyant tube 21 having been connected at its lower end tothe seat section 5 of the basicframework is now connected at its upper end to the back section 3 of the basic framework by looping the straps 39 about the buoyant tube at the upper corners thereof. It will be recognized frornconsideration of the drawings that the pairs of straps 33 and 39 are so positioned on the basic framework that the distance between such pairs is substantially equal to the 4 length of the arm members 23 and 25 of the buoyant tube so that when the latter is in operative position removably associated with the basic framework the arm members 23 and 25 of the buoyant tube will he more or iess in taut condition so that they will not sag in the absence of pressure being applied thereon.

I provide a seat structure 45 for the buoyant chair and this seat structure may consist of -'a plastic or fabric hammock seat which at its upper end is looped about the transverse connecting or head member 11 of the back section 3 of the basic framework as at "47 and the looped portion is then removably fastened to the body of the seat 45 by means of spaced transverse rows of metal snap fasteners, metal or plastic eyelets 49 or the like. Thus by providing two rows of fasteners the seat may be adjusted as to length. At its lower end the seat 45 is looped under the transverse connecting or foot member 17 as at 51 and is fastened'to the seat by any suitable fasteners 53. I form the seat 45 of a length suflicient so that it will not be tautly held between the transverse connec ing members Hand 17 to which it is anchored but instead will sag so that the main body portion 55 thereof will be submerged in the water when the buoyant chair is floating on the water.

Adjacent the upper of the leg 9 of the seat section 3 of the basic framework I securely fasten in any suitable manner a clamp memberjTwhich is adapted to remov ably receive therein a plastic or wooden canoe paddle 59 which in operative position associated with the chair may extend over and be partially supported by the arm 23 of the buoyant tube. 'On the other arm 25 of the buoyant tube I removably mount by means .of a'strap 61 having a buckle or the like 63 an inflated plastic or rubber ring 65 which is ofsu'ch dimensions that it will receive a recessed metal or plastic tray'67 which is -adapted to function as either an ash tray or'as a coaster support for beverage glasses. The inflatable ring 65 is provided with a conventional inflation and deflation valve 69.

With all of the various parts and elements associated together as described above it will be appreciated that the combination of elements provides a chair which will float on the water with parts thereof submerged so that portions of the body of the occupant of the chair will be submerged within the water. Fig. 2 particularly illustrates the general positions which the elements of the chair will assume relative to the water when the chair is in operative position on the water. Due to the angular relationship of the sections of the basic framework it will be appreciated that the occupant of the chair may restfully sit therein in semireclining position as the chair floats on the water and may, by removing the paddle 59 from its clamp 57, propel himself to any part of the pool or other body of water upon which he may be floating. He may also smoke while enjoying the comforts and cooling effect of the water or he may partake of a drink. The occupants comfort. will also be increased because of the arm rests which the arm members 23 and 25 of the buoyant tube provide.

The buoyant chair of this invention has been so constructed that it may be. disassembled in part and then collapsed for ease of transportation and storage. This is an advantage for it not only permits collapsing but also permits speedy tube replacement. The buoyant tube 21 may be-quickly detached from its operative position on H and connected to the basic framework by merely unbuckling the straps 37 and 39 and the paddle may of course be released from its clamp. When this has been done the basic framework with its attached seat member 45 may be folded into the position illustrated in Fig. 3. Since the fabric or plastic seat is at least as long as the length of the sections thereof when the legs of the two sections are in alignment, which occurs during the act of folding or collapsing the framework, the framework may be easily collapsed for storage or for carrying.

I claim:

1. A buoyant chair adapted to float on water with an occupant therein, including in combination a buoyant member of generally rectangular configuration providing a pair of transversely spaced longitudinally extending buoyant tubes and transversely extending buoyant tubes connecting the ends of the longitudinally extending tubes together, there being an unobstructed space between said buoyant tubes, and a basic framework of generally rectangular configuration including a back and seat section and the two sections being angularly related and each of said sections comprising a pair of rigid transversely spaced longitudinally extending legs, the legs of one pair being connected at their ends to the ends of the legs of the other pair and the legs of each pair being connected at their opposite ends by transversely extending rigid connecting members, said buoyant member being connected at one end to said back section and at its other end to said seat section and extending therebetween to floatingly support said basic framework, and a flexible seat for supporting the occupant of the chair, said seat being fastened at one end to the transverse connecting member of said seat section and at its other end to said transverse connecting member of said back section and extending through said unobstructed space and a portion thereof being below the plane of said buoyant member.

2. A buoyant chair adapted to float on water with an occupant therein, including in combination, a flexible inflated buoyant member and a basic framework of generally rectangular configuration having rigid characteristics relative to said buoyant member, said basic framework being connected to said buoyant member and floatingly supported thereby, and said basic framework including transversely spaced longitudinally extending legs and connecting members fixed to and extending between the ends of said legs, and said buoyant member providing sections extending over portions of said legs providing arm rests for the occupant of the buoyant chair and providing a further section which extends over one of said connecting members providing a leg rest for the occupant of the chair, and a seat fixed to and extending between said connecting members.

3. A buoyant chair adapted to float on water with an occupant therein, including in combination, a buoyant member of generally rectangular configuration providing a pair of transversely spaced longitudinally extending buoyant tubes and transversely extending tubes connecting the ends of the longitudinally extending; tubes together and a basic framework having rigid characteristics relative to said buoyant member, said basic framework being connected to said buoyant member and floatingly supported thereby, said basic framework including transversely spaced longitudinally extending legs and connecting members fixed to and extending between the ends of said legs, one of said longitudinally extending buoyant tubes extending over one of said longitudinally extending legs and the other of said longitudinally extending buoyant tubes extending over the other of said longitudinally extending legs providing arm rests for the occupant of the chair and one of said transversely extending buoyant tubes extending over one of said connecting members providing a leg rest for the occupant of the buoyant chair, and a seat fixed to and extending between said connecting members.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,555,589 La Farina Sept. 29, 1925 2,173,963 Eubank Sept. 26, 1939 2,332,009 Perri Oct. 19, 1943 2,496,460 Evans Feb. 7, 1950 2,685,270 Pierac Aug. 3, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 17,668 Great Britain 1887

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Classifications
U.S. Classification441/131, D21/809
International ClassificationB63C9/00, B63C9/30
Cooperative ClassificationA47C15/006, B63C9/30
European ClassificationB63C9/30, A47C15/00P2