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Publication numberUS2803907 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 27, 1957
Filing dateNov 3, 1952
Priority dateNov 3, 1952
Publication numberUS 2803907 A, US 2803907A, US-A-2803907, US2803907 A, US2803907A
InventorsWeaver Williams R
Original AssigneeWeaver Williams R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telescopic sight mount for firearms
US 2803907 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1957 w. R. WEAVER 7 2,803,907

TELESCOPIC SIGHT MOUNT FOR FIREARMS Filed Nov. 5, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet l RIG MI W/I/Iam R. Weaver INVENTOR.

A TTORNEY Aug. 27, 1957 w. R. WEAVER I 2,303,907

TELESCOPIC SIGHT MOUNT FOR FIREARMS Filed Nov. 3, 1952 2.Sheets-Sheet 2 W/ am R. Weaver INVENTOR.

ATTORA/f) United States Patent Ofitice 2,803,907 Patented Aug. 27, 1957 TELESCOPIC SIGHT MOUNT FOR FIREARMS William R. Weaver, El Paso, Tex.

Application November 3, 1952, Serial No. 318,417

4 Claims. (Cl. 421) This invention relates to improvements in firearms and more particularly to an improved means whereby a telescopic sight may be mounted thereon.

In firearms employing telescopic sights, it is frequently desirable and necessary to remove the sight for cleaning and other purposes, and removable sight mounts of various types have been designed and employed for this purpose.

Present sight mounts are often expensive to manufacture, complicated in construction and require considerable effort and manipulation for removal and replacement of the sight.

It is also an essential requirement for removable telescopic sight mounts that they support the sight in rigid relationship to the firearm and that when removed the sight may be remounted in each instance in identical relationship to the firearm so as to eliminate any necessity for re-targeting the firearm upon re-mounting of the sight thereon. Usually a clamping means of dove-tail shape is used. This type of construction requires accurate machining and precise fitting of parts which limits production and availability.

Accordingly, it is a principal object of this invention to provide a sight mount of simple and inexpensive construction giving the sturdiness and accuracy of present complicated and precisely fitted mounts which will permit quick and easy removal and replacement of the sight as often as desired and which will re-locate the sight in the same position relative to the barrel of the firearm in each instance.

Another advantage of this invention is that it allows easier removal of the mount than the usual dove-tail type. The latter must be slid longitudinally the full length of the dove-tail for removal which often introduces problems of interference with metallic sights or other protuberances on the firearm whereas the mount herein described can be lifted straight up and directly off the firearm merely by loosening the clamp.

A more specific object is to provide a sight mount construction employing a separable two-part clamp for releasably gripping the barrel of the firearm, one part of such clamp being integral with the sight support bracket.

A further object is to provide a sight mount construction employing a separable two-part clamp for releasably gripping the barrel or receiver of the firearm on opposite sides thereof, one of the parts being integral with the sight support bracket and provided with a gripping jaw or lip of a suitable interlocking shape, such as triangular, adapted to engage in a groove in the barrel or receiver or in a base plate mounted on the firearm, the other and separable part of the clamp having jaws or lips at its upper and lower longitudinal edges, the lower one of which is adapted to engage a groove in the barrel, or receiver or a base plate, parallel to and laterally spaced from the first groove, the upper jaw or lip of the separable part of the clamp being adapted to engage in a groove provided in the sight support bracket, the parts of the clamp when engaged in their respective grooves being urged toward each other in clamping engagement with the barrel, receiver or base plate by suitable means, such as a screw means, extending transversely of the clamp between the parts thereof.

Other and more specific objects and advantages of this invention will become more readily apparent from the following detailed description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings which illustrate useful embodiments in accordance with this invention.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is 'an elevational view of one side of a sight mount in accordance with one embodiment of this invention, showing the mount in place on a firearm, the telescopic sight being shown in dotted outline in the position it normally occupies in the mount;

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 but showing the opposite side of the mount;

Fig. 3 is a vertical front end view of the mount looking along line 33 of Fig. 1, the barrel of the firearm being shown in cross-section;

Fig. 4 is an elevational view showing one side of a mount in accordance with another embodiment of this invention;

Fig. 5 is a front end elevation of the mount shown in Fig. 4 as viewed along line 55 thereof; and

Fig. 6 is an enlarged end elevation of another modification of a sight mount in accordance wi'th this invention.

In the embodiment illustrated in Figs. 1 to 3, the mount includes a tubular bracket, designated generally by the numeral 10, which is adapted to encircle and grip the barrel of a generally conventional telescope sight, shown in broken lines in Figs. 1 and 2, and designated generally by the numeral 11. Bracket 15 is provided with a radial split, as at 12, which extends longitudinally of the bracket and is preferably, though not necessarily, located in a lower quadrant of the bracket at an angle to the vertical central plane of the bracket; The edges of the split merge into registering outer and inner radially projecting, parallel flanges 13 and 14, respectively, which extend longitudinally for the full length of the bracket. The upper portion of bracket 19 intermediate its ends may be cut away as at 15, thereby defining clamping bands 16 and 1'7 at the opposite ends of the bracket which are joined by, and integral with, flanges 13 and 14. Screws l.818 extend through longitudinally spaced points along outer flange l3 and screw into registering threaded holes 19 in inner flange 14 in order to draw the flanges together and thereby clamp bracket 10 tightly about sight barrel ll, and provides means for releasably securing the sight to the bracket.

Inner flange 14 has integrally joined with its outer margin an extension 20 which extends throughout the length of the flange and projects inwardly and downwardly at an angle to the plane of flange 14. The outer margin of extension 20 is bevelled at 21 rearwardly from its upper face 22 so as to provide a clamping edge 23 which is generally triangular in cross-section the apex of the triangle projecting inwardly toward the center line of the mount. Flange 14 and extension 20 comprise one mounting leg which depends from bracket 10 on one side of the vertical center line thereof and is integral bracket with respect to flange 14 and leg 20. P1ate25 formsa second mounting leg for bracket 10 which is separably connected to the bracket. The upper and lower "ticularly in Figs..1 to 3.

margins of plate are formed to provide inwardly turned .lips 26 and 27, respectively, each of which is generally triangular in cross-section, upper lip 26 being adapted to enter channel 24 and seat therein. A pair of longitudinally spacedclamping bolts 28, having heads 29 at one end, extend through plate 25 transversely below bracket 10 and are provided at their opposite ends with threaded portions which are receivable in threaded sockets 31 located at the juncture of flange 14 and leg 20. By meansof bolts 28 the mounting legs of the bracket may be drawn or urged toward each other.

'34 receiving clamping lip 27.

' The above-described mount is employed in the following manner: Sight 11 will be inserted in bracket 10 whereupon screws 18 will be screwed down to firmly secure the sight in the bracket. Bolts 28 are not removed but only loosened sufiiciently to allow clamping plate to be withdrawn partially or completely from its engagement in channel 24 of the bracket. Clamping edge 23 will be inserted in grooves 33 and clamping lips '26 and 27 will then be inserted into channel 24 and groove 34, respectively. Bolt 28 will then be tightened sufiiciently to urge the mounting legs toward each other to thereby effect tight gripping engagement between bracket 10 and bar'- 7 rel 32.

' By employment of the triangular grooves 33 and 34 and channel 24 and correspondingly shaped clamping edges on the mounting legs,'as described, it will be seen that the inner sides of each of the grooves 33, 34 and channel 24 will form three areas of gripping engagement between the bracket and the barrel so directed with respect to each other that each time the bracket is mounted on the barrel and bolts 28 tightened, the bracket will necessarily and unavoidably be returned to the very same position on the barrel. To remove the sight it is only necessary to loosen clamping bolts 28 sufficiently to release clamping plate 25 from its engagement with groove 34. The sight and mount can then be lifted straight upwards.

The mount described provides secure attachment of the mount to the firearm while permitting easy removal and replacement with positive assurance of return of the sight to thesame position with respect to the barrel which :it occupied after an original mounting and targeting adjustment.

Figs. 4 and 5 illustrate an embodiment in :which bracket 10, instead of being formed as a single elongated tubular member, as in the previously described embodiment, is composed of two short sections, designated by the numerals 10a and 10b :Which maybe spaced apart along the firearm barrelat any desired spacing. In all other respects the mount is identical in form and function with that previously described, the'corresponding parts thereof being designated by the same numerals.

In this embodiment the mount, instead of being mount- 7 ed directly on the barrel is illustrated as being mounted on base plates 35-35 which may be removably secured to the top of barrel 32 by means .of screws 36 36. In this modificationthe previously described grooves 33 and 34 are provided in opposite sides of base plates 35- 35 instead of in the barrel itself. Their form and function is otherwise identical with the previously described em bodiment. Q

It will be understood, of course, that the two-part bracketmay be employed with grooves formed directly on barrel'32 or that the one-piece bracket of the first-de tit 4 scribed embodiment may be used with a base plate such as base plate 35. r

Fig. '6 illustrates still another modification in which a sight bracket 40 is provided with a'split 41 along its top, the edges of the split being joined with vertically extending mating flanges 4242, whereby the bracket segments may be clamped together by means of one or more screws 43. A mounting :leg 44integral with the lower portion of bracket 40 depends vertically therefrom and is provided with an inwardly turned clamping lip 45 having a triangular lower margin 46. A triangular channel 47 is provided in the lower periphery of bracket 40 transversely spaced from leg 44 on the opposite side of the center of the bracket. A second depending mounting leg comprising a clamping plate '48, identical in form with clamping plate 25 of the previously described embodiments, is employed and. has similar inturned, triangular-shaped upper and lower marginal lips 49 and 50,

lip 49 being receivable in channel .47, and lip .50 being receivable in a triangular groove 51 provided in firearm barrel 52. A second triangular groove 53 is provided in barrel 52 transversely-spaced from groove 51 and is adapted-to receive clamping edge46. A clamping bolt 54 is'employed, as in the-previous embodiment, to draw the mounting legstoward each other and to secure the bracket to the firearm barrel in exactly the same manner as in the previously described embodiments. V

The lips and grooves shown are generally triangular but cube of any interlocking shape and it will be understood that various changes and modifications may be made in the details of the illustrative embodiments within the scope of the appended claims but without departing from the spirit'ofthis invention.

What I claim and desire'to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In combination with a firearm having a pair of spaced apart longitudinally extending grooves disposed on an upper portion thereof, a telescopic sightmount removably attachable to said firearm, comprising, a sightsupporting bracket member adapted to be positioned substantially parallel to said firearm, a first mounting leg integral with and depending'from said bracket member and extending longitudinally thereof, an'inturned lip on the lower margin of said first mounting leg receivable in the adjacent one of said grooves, a longitudinal channel in said bracket member on the opposite side from said first mounting leg, a'second mounting leg extending longitudinally of and separably connected to said bracket member, said second mounting leg having inturned lips along its upper and lower margins receivable respectively in said channel and the other one of said grooves, and releasable means compressively engaging said mounting legs to urge s'aid mounting legs toward each other to thereby clamp said bracket member to said firearm, and

upper portion of said firearm.

2. In combination with a firearm having a pair of parallel longitudinally extending grooves disposed on the a upper portion thereof in transversely spaced apart relation, said grooves being generally triangular" in crosssection, a telescopic sight'mount for attachment to said firearm, comprising, a generally tubular sight-supporting bracket member adapted .to be disposed above and substantially parallel to said firearm, first and second spacedapart parallel mounting legs depending from opposite sides of said bracket member, said first mounting leg being integral with said bracket member, and said second mounting leg being separably connected to said bracket member, an inturned lip of generally triangular crosssection along the lower margin of said first mounting legreceivable in the adjacent oneof said grooves, a longitudinal channel of generally triangular cross-section in the periphery of said br acket 'rnemb er laterally spaced from said first; mounting leg and parallel to and vertically red ani t esis? Q 91 sadjsl e v sls id sec nd mounting leg having inturned lips of generally triangular cross-section along its upper and lower margins receivable respectively in said channel and said other one of said grooves, and releasable compression means extending transversely between said mounting legs to urge said legs toward each other to thereby clamp said bracket member to said firearm.

3. A telescopic sight mount as defined by claim 2, wherein said grooves are disposed in the barrel of said firearm.

4. In combination with a firearm, a telescopic sight mount for attachment to said firearm, comprising, an elongated base plate releasably secured to a top portion of said firearm, a pair of longitudinally extending parallel grooves along the side edges of said base plate, a generally tubular sight-receiving bracket member adapted to be positioned above and substantially parallel to said firearm, a first mounting leg integral with and depending from said bracket member and extending longitudinally thereof, an inturned lip on the lower margin of said first mounting leg receivable in the adjacent one of said grooves, a longitudinal channel in the periphery of said bracket member on the opposite side from said first mounting leg, a second mounting leg disposed generally parallel to said first mounting leg and separably connected to said bracket member, said second mounting leg having inturned lips along its upper and lower margins receivable respectively in said channel and the other one of said grooves, and releasable compression means extending transversely between said mounting legs to urge said mounting legs toward each other to thereby clamp said bracket member to said base plate, and whereby when said means is released said bracket member may be removed by lateral movement relative to said upper portion of said firearm.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1291692 *May 28, 1918Jan 14, 1919C C WilliamsRear-sight holder for military rifles.
US2449551 *Jun 1, 1945Sep 21, 1948Us Sec WarTelescope mount
US2491431 *Sep 27, 1947Dec 13, 1949John UnertlTelescope mounting
*DE298969C Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3253361 *Aug 31, 1964May 31, 1966William R WeaverMounts for telescope sight
US3260001 *Apr 5, 1963Jul 12, 1966Weaver Mfg IncTelescope sight mount for firearms
US3292264 *May 11, 1965Dec 20, 1966Kincannon Leo TTelescope sight mounting
US4026055 *Apr 9, 1976May 31, 1977Weast Gerald TTelescopic sight mounting
US4044486 *Feb 23, 1976Aug 30, 1977James Wilbur Van HoltenGun sight mounting
US4299044 *Sep 17, 1979Nov 10, 1981Wideview Scope Mount CorporationTelescopic sight mount for firearms
US5353539 *Aug 24, 1993Oct 11, 1994Horst Blaser JagdwaffenbarikMounting device for a telescopic sight on a rifle
US5570529 *Jun 7, 1995Nov 5, 1996Hughes Aircraft CompanyTorque-limiting weapon mount and weapon system utilizing the mount
US5941006 *Mar 16, 1998Aug 24, 1999Horton; John WileyTo a rifle
US7752800 *Dec 6, 2005Jul 13, 2010Se-Kure Controls, Inc.System for securing a fishing reel to a support
US8171666 *Jul 28, 2009May 8, 2012Theodore KaragiasScope mounting clamps for firearms
US8572885Jan 12, 2011Nov 5, 2013Theodore KaragiasMounting clamps for coupling scopes to mounting rails of firearms
DE1125315B *May 18, 1960Mar 8, 1962Birmingham Small Arms Comp LtdHalterung fuer eine Visiereinrichtung an einer Waffe
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/124, 42/76.1
International ClassificationF41G1/00, F41G1/38, F41G1/387
Cooperative ClassificationF41G1/38, F41G11/003
European ClassificationF41G11/00B4, F41G1/38