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Publication numberUS2805558 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1957
Filing dateDec 20, 1954
Priority dateDec 20, 1954
Publication numberUS 2805558 A, US 2805558A, US-A-2805558, US2805558 A, US2805558A
InventorsKnight James L
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerating apparatus including rotating heat exchangers
US 2805558 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7 Sept. 10, 1957 J. L. KNlGHT 2,80 8

REFRIGERATING APPARATUS INCLUDING ROTATING HEAT EXCHANGERS Filed Dec. 20, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 m INVENTORQ I amass L. KNIGHT H I5 ATTORNEY J. L. KNIGHT Sept. 10, 1957 REFRIGERATING APPARATUS INCLUDING ROTATING HEAT EXCHANGERS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 20, 1954 INVENTOR. JAMES L- KNIGHT HIS ATTORNEY Patented Sept. 10, 1957 ice REFRIGERATING EPARATUS INCLUDING ROTATING HEAT EXCHANGERS James L. Knight, Louisville, Ky., assigner to Gen-eral Electric Company, a corporation of New York Application December 20, 1954, Serial No. 476,314

5 (llaims. (Cl. 52-1175) My invention relates to refrigerating apparatus and more particularly to such apparatus including rotating heat exchangers.

A rapidly increasing use of refrigerating apparatus is in window air conditioning units for cooling rooms, offices, or other enclosures. The refrigeration systems customarily incorporated in these units include a refrigerant compressor, a first heat exchanger or evaporator and a second heat exchanger or condenser. The room air to be cooled is blown over the evaporator which absorbs heat therefrom, and this heat is then rejected to the outside atmosphere by means of a stream of outdoor air which is blown over the condenser. The evaporator and the condenser are stationary, and thus to set up their respective air streams rotating fans or blowers are required. A separate fan or blower is necessarily provided for each air stream, and at least one additional motor besides the compressor motor is needed to drive these fans or blowers.

However, if the heat exchangers themselves, i. e. the evaporator and the condenser, were rotating rather than stationary elements, they could serve as their own air moving means. In other words, they themselves by their rotation could draw the room and outdoor air streams over their coils. This would, of course, obviate the need for the separate fans or blowers and their additional driving motor or motors.

Accordingly, it is a primary object of my invention to provide new and improved refrigerating apparatus having rotating heat exchangers.

Another object of my invention is to provide new and improved refrigerating apparatus of this type, which utilizes a vane type compressor and requires no shaft seals between rotating and stationary parts.

A further object of my invention is to provide an improved refrigerant compressor or pump arrangement adapted for use in refrigerating apparatus having rotating heat exchangers.

In carrying out my invention I provide refrigerating apparatus in which all the moving elements are driven by a single motor. The apparatus includes refrigerant pumping means comprising a cylinder member which forms a pumping chamber, and a pumping member which is positioned within the chamber. To effect a pumping action the pumping member and the cylinder member are both rotatably mounted, one on the axis of the motor shaft and the other eccentrically of the axis, and at least one reciprocating blade is provided within the chamber, the blade being mounted on one of the members and engaging the other of them. The two members are both driven from the shaft at the same speed of rotation, and upon their movement the blade sweeps the volume in the chamber not occupied by the pumping member, thereby producing a pumping action. The apparatus further includes a pair of heat exchangers; and in accordance with my invention these heat exchangers are so mounted that they also rotate during the operation of the apparatus,

the one heat exchanger being mounted on the cylinder member for rotation therewith and the other heat exchanger being mounted on the motor shaft for rotation therewith. The two heat exchangers are connected re spectively to the inlet and the outlet of the pumping means, and are themselves connected together by expansion means so that a closed refrigerant circuit is formed within the apparatus. As a result and by my invention the apparatus operates as a complete refrigeration system or unit having rotating heat exchangers.

The novel features which I believe to be characteristic of my invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. My invention itself, however, both as to its organization and the method of operation, may be best understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view of a preferred embodiment of my new and improved refrigerating apparatus;

Fig. 2. is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 22 of Fig. 1 and showing the compressor or pumping means of the apparatus, the rotative position of the pumping means being different however in Pig. 2 than in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing the pumping means in another rotative position thereof; and

Fig. 4 is another view similar to Fig. 2 showing the pumping means in a still different rotative position thereof.

Referring now to Fig. l I have shown therein a preferred embodiment of my new and improved refrigerating apparatus. In this preferred embodiment the ap paratus includes a main frame or casing 1 which mounts the various operative elements thereof. These elements include a single driving motor 2 whose stator 3 is mounted directly on the frame 1 and whose shaft 4 is supported from the frame by means of spaced apart ballbearing mounts 5 and 6. The ballbearing mounts 5 and 6 may themselves be supported from the frame in any suitable manner. For example in my preferred embodiment, the bearings 5 are supported by means of the inwardly extending spokes 7, and the bearings 6 are mounted in the end wall 8 of the frame. However, it should be understood that the ball bearings could be supported by other means and in fact that difierent mounting arrangements for the shaft could be used than the ball bearings. Sleeve bearings, roller hearings, or other suitable arrangements could be used if desired.

The shaft 4 serves as the means for driving the other rotating elements of the apparatus. These elements include a refrigerant pumping or compressing means, generally designated at 9, and a pair of heat exchangers 19 and 11. The refrigerant pumping means 9 comprises a cylinder member 12 and a pumping member 13, and as described hereinafter, the rotating heat exchangers are so connected to these members of the pumping means that a complete closed refrigeration system is formed in the apparatus.

The one heat exchanger 11 is mounted directly on the shaft 4 for rotation therewith. T his heat exchanger comprises a spirally wound tube 14 which carries a plurality of looped wire elements 15 for increasing the heat exchange surface thereof. To effect a rotative mounting the ubing and wire elements are suitably fitted into a plurality of radially extending spokes or blades 16 which are themselves mounted at the one end of the shaft 4. The blades 16 may be secured to the shaft by any suitable means as for example by welding, and they are so shaped that upon the rotation of the shaft 4 they act as fan blades. in other words, they are suitably formed so that upon the rotation of shaft 4 they are effective to set up air flow through the heat exchanger and over the tubing 14. In the operation of my refrigerating apparatus, the heat exchanger 11 is adapted to serve as an evaporator, and if the refrigerating apparatus is incorporated in a room air conditioner, the blades 16 can'serve as the sole means for setting up a flow of room air over the evaporator.

The second heat exchanger It serves as the condenser during the operation of my referigerating apparatus, and as mentioned above it is also mounted for rotational movement. Moreover, like the heat exchanger 11 it also includes means for setting up its own air flow. The construction of this heat exchanger if} and the manner in which it is mounted, will, however, be explained hereinafter.

, Turning now to the pumping means 9, it will be seen by reference to Fig. 1 that the Walls of the cylinder member 12, define a pumping chamber 17 within which pumpingmember 13 is positioned. The cylinder member 12 Specifically includes spaced apart end'walls 18 and 19 and an annular center portion or wall 2t), all of which cooperate to form the pumping chamber. Since the center wall 20 constitutes the outer wall of the chamber, the chamber itself thus has a round peripheral surface.

The pumping element 13, which as shown in Fig. 2 comprises a cylindrical or disc-like element, is positioned within the chamber 17 so that it contacts the round wall 20 at one point. Specifically, the pumping member 13 is mounted on the left hand end of the shaft 4' so as to make this single point or line of contact with the wall 29. An aperture 21 in the end wall 19 of the cylinder element allows the shaft 4 to extend into the pumping chamber to accomplish this mounting. The pumping member 13 may be formed integrally with the shaft 4 or it may be a separate member keyed or otherwise mounted for rotation therewith.

According to my invention, the cylinder member 12 is also mounted for rotational movement so that inaddition to acting as part of the pumping means, it may also serve as a means for rotating the heat exchanger 10. In order to accomplish both of these results the cylinder member 12 is, however, not mounted on the same center or axis as the pumping member 13. The pumping member 13 is, of course, mounted on the axis of the shaft 4, but the cylinder member 12 is mounted somewhat eccentrically or offset of that axis. In other words, it is mounted on a different axis. For example, in my preferred embodiment the axis of rotation of the cylinder element 12 is spaced somewhat vertically below and parallel to the axis of the shaft 4 as viewed in Fig. l. The mounting of the cylinder element may be accomplished by any suitable means. For example, in my preferred embodiment it is held by means of a plurality of ballbearing mounts 22 which are supported from the main frame 1 by means of mounting arms 23 formed integrally with the frame. Obviously, however, other types of rotational mountings than ballbearings could be used and the mounts could be supported by other suitable means, as by a tubular extension of the frame rather than the illustrated mounting arms.

As above mentioned, in my preferred embodiment the rotatably mounted cylinder member 12 serves as the means whereby the heat exchanger 1%} is rotated. For this purpose the heat exchanger 19 is mounted directly on the cylinder 12 so that whenever the cylinder 12 is turned, the heat exchanger 10 is also turned. The heat exchanger Iii specifically comprises a spirally wound tube 24 which carries a plurality of looped wire elements 25 for increasing the heat exchange surface thereof. To effect a rotative mounting the tube and the looped wire elements are suitably fitted in a plurality of radially extending blades 26 which are in turn secured as by welding to the left-hand. end of shaft 4 (as viewed in Fig. 1). These blades 26 incidentally are so formed that upon rotation of the heat exchanger they create an air flow therethrough. In my preferred embodiment the heat exchanger 10 acts as a condenser, and if the apparatus is used in a room air conditioner, the blades 26 can be employed as the sole means for setting up a flow of outside air over the condenser.

To provide for the rotation of the cylinder member 12 and the heat exchanger 10, I have connected the cylinder member 12 to the shaft 4 of the motor so that it is driven thereby. The means connecting the cylinder member to the shaft comprise a linkage which drives the cylinder member but yet allows relative movement to occur between it and the shaft during their rotation. Relative movement must, of course, necessarily occur between the two because they are mounted on different axes. In the illustrated embodiment the driving linkage includes a plurality of outstanding arms or spoke members 27 which are mounted on the shaft 4. These spokes may be attached or keyed to the shaft 4 in any suitable manner 7 but preferably, as shown, they are mounted thereon by a hub 27a. To turn the cylinder element 12 and thereby the heat exchanger 10 the spokes 27 engage outstanding studs or extensions 28 formed on or secured to the cylinder element 12. The spokes 27 are, however, not secured to these studs 28 but rather only contact their outer ends. This loose contact between the spokes and the studs is effective to drive the cylinder member 12 and the heat'exchanger 10 from the shaft 4, but since there is no rigid attachment between'the cylinder member and the shaft, they are free to rotate on different centers. Because of the eccentric mounting of the cylinder member 12 the studs 28 in effect move up and down the spokes 27 as they rotate but no binding occurs therebetween; It should be realized though that other linkages besides the illustrated one could be used to drive the cylinder member 12 and the heat exchanger 10 from shaft 4. For example, a large Oldham type coupling could be used..

In my refrigerating apparatus the two rotating heat exchangers 10 and 11 and the pumping means 9. are interconnected so that they form a complete closed refrigeration system. The pumping means 9 provide a pumping 7 action whereby refrigerant is circulated through this system and the manner in which the cylinder member 12 and the pumping member 13 cooperate to produce this action will be more fully explained hereinafter. To form the closed system, the heat exchanger 19 is connected to the outlet of the pumping means; the heat exchanger 11 is connected to the inlet of thepumping means; and the two heat exchangers are connected together by an expansion means. Thus during the operation of the system the heat exchanger 10 acts as a condenser wherein heat is rejected from the refrigerant and the heat exchanger 11 acts as an evaporator wherein heat is absorbed by the refrigerant;

To explain in greater detail the system of my preferred embodiment, it will be seen by reference to Fig. I that the heat exchanger 10 thereof is connected to'the outlet from the pumpingmeans by means of a tube 29. This tube 29 communicateswith the pumping chamber 17 through an outlet aperture 30 in the wall 20 of the cylinder member 12,'and during. the operation of the apparatus the tube 29 carries hotcompressedgas from the pumping chamber 17 to the tubing 24 of the heat exchanger 10. The hot discharge gas is cooled and liquefied in'the heat exchanger 10 by means ofthe air stream set up by the blades 26, and is then fed to expansion means which connectthe discharge end ofthe heat exchanger 10 to the intake end of the heat exchanger 11. Specifically, in my preferred embodiment the refrigerant is carried from theheat exchanger 10- to the heat exchanger 11 by means of a restrictor or capillary tube 31 which is mounted within the hollow bore 32ofithe shaft 4 by suitable spacing elements 33. The capillary tube 31 extends longitudinally through the passageway '32 and at its intake. endyop'ens into a.

recess'34 in the inner side of the end wall 18 of the cylincondenser 10, and thus the liquefied refrigerant from the heat exchanger 1i) is introduced to the capillary tube through the recess. The recess 34 is made of sufficient size so that continuous contact is maintained between it and the capillary tube as the cylinder 12 and the shaft 4 rotate on their different axes. This communication between the recess 34 and the capillary tube 31 obviates the need for a flexible coupling which would be otherwise required to connect the tube and the heat exchanger rotating on their different axes. At its other end the capillary tube 31 is connected to the inlet of the heat exchanger .or evaporator 11 by means of a radially extending portion 36 thereof.

By the time the refrigerant reaches the evaporator 11 it has been expanded by means of the capillary tube 31 so that it is relatively cold. The cold refrigerant then flows through the tubing 14 of the evaporator picking up heat from the air stream flowing over the evaporator. This air stream is, as explained above, set up by the blades 16 and when the apparatus is incorporated in a room air conditioner the air stream is a flow of air taken from the room and returned thereto. After passing through the tubing 14 the refrigerant then returns to the pumping means 9, or more exactly it is drawn out of the evaporator by means of the pumping means 9.

The outlet end of the evaporator 11 is connected to the inlet of the pumping means through a tubing member 37 and the hollow bore or passageway 32 through the shaft 4. Specifically, the tube 37 leads from the outlet end of the evaporator 11 into the bore 32 of the shaft, and the bore 32 acts as a suction gas conduit completing the passage of the cool suction refrigerant to the inlet of the pumping means. As shown in the diagrams, this inlet to the pumping means comprises a radially extending slot 38 in the pumping element 13, which at its inner end communicates with the passageway 52, and which at its outer end opens into the pumping chamber 17. The slot 33 may be best seen in Figs. 2-4. It will be noted incidentally that the cool suction gas while passing through the bore or passageway 32 is in heat exchange relation with the capillary tube 31. There is thus heat interchange between the cool suction gas and the relatively warm refrigerant flowing in the capillary tube, and as is well known in the art, this heat interchange improves the operating efliciency of the system. With reference to both the bore 32 and the capillary tube 31 it will be understood that the capillary tube need not necessarily be a separate member positioned within the bore; rather, if desired, two separate bores or passageways of suitable size could be provided within the shaft. The one here would then serve as a capillary expansion passageway and the other would serve as the suction gas conduit.

The manner in which my novel pumping means 9 produces a pumping action to cause the circulation of re frigerant through the apparatus will now be explained. As mentioned above, in my preferred embodiment the inlet to the pumping means is provided by the passageway 38 in the pumping member i3 and the outlet from the pumping means is taken through the aperture 3% in the cylinder member 12. In order that a pumping action may be eflected, the pumping member and the pumping cylinder are so arranged that the inlet 33 and the outlet 30 are positioned relatively near each other throughout the rotation of both of these members. The inlet and outlet are not positioned directly opposite each other but rather are spaced far enough apart that a blade or vane member 39 may be positioned between them. This blade or vane member, which is'mounted on one of the pumping and cylinder members and engages the other of the members, provides the means whereby the pumping action is accomplished. Although the blade 39 could be mounted on either of these members, in my preferred embodiment it is mounted on the pumping member 13. Specifically, as shown in Figs. 24 it is sli'dably mounted in a slot 49 in the pumping member and is spring-biased outwardly by means of a spring 41 positioned behind it in the slot. The force of the spring 41 insures that the vane 39 maintains engagement with the Wall 20 of the pumping chamber at all times.

The manner in which the pumping action is produced may be best understood by reference to Figs. 2, 3 and 4. As shown therein and as explained above, the pumping member 13 is positioned within the chamber 17 so that it contacts the wall 20 of the chamber at one point. However, the pumping member is not as large as the chamber so that a more or less crescent-shaped space remains within the chamber which is not occupied by the pumping member. During the rotation of the refrigerating apparatus, the blade 39 sweeps this crescent-shaped space as it moves with the pumping member 13. Moreover, since the inlet 38 also moves with the pumping member and since the outlet 39 moves at the same rate on the cylinder member, the inlet and the outlet also move past the crescentshaped space with the blade. The outlet, however, leads V the blade past the space whereas the inlet follows it. As

the blade moves through the crescent-shaped space it COJ presses the gas lying ahead of it and forces this gas outwardly through the outlet 30. But simultaneously as the space ahead of the blade is decreasing and the compressed gas is being pushed out through the outlet 30, the space behind the blade is increasing and suction gas is being fed into it through the inlet 38. Thus as the blade on each revolution sweeps compressed gas out through the outlet 30, the crescent-shaped space is at the same time refilled with gas for compression during the next revolution. This action can be clearly seen by comparing the sequential rotational positions of the pumping means shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 4.

it will be understood that if desired suitable valve means, as for example a flapper valve, may be used in cooperation with the outlet opening 3% so that only when I the gas is compressed to a certain pressure will it be forced out into the condenser it Further, if desired, both the inlet and the outlet openings could be positioned in the rotating cylinder element 12 or they could both be formed in the rotating pumping element 13. However, such an arrangement would require a more complicated refrigerant tubing arrangement in order to complete the refrigerant system.

in order for my improved refrigerating apparatus to operate satisfactorily, there must, of course, be no leakage of refrigerant therefrom. Due to the manner in which the apparatus is constructed and arranged, there are no places at which leakage can occur under normal conditions except perhaps along the righthand sides of the pumping ember 13 between it and the cylinder 12. But there unfortunately, even though the fit between the pumping member and the pumping cylinder is a relatively tight one,

there nonetheless could be some small leakage along the righthand side of the pumping element (as viewed in Fig. 1) and out through the aperture 21. However, by my invention I have provided means whereby the refrigerant is prevented from escaping from the apparatus by such leakage. This means comprises a flexible sealing member 42 which is connected between the cylinder element 12 and the shaft d. The sealing element may for example comprise an expansible bellows, and in my preferred embodiment is actually such a member. At its one end this sealing element or bellows 52 is attached to the cylinder element 12 by means of an annular slot 43 formed therein, the bellows fitting tightly into the slot so as to form a seal. At its other end the bellows is attached to the shaft'by means of the hub member 271:, which supports the spokes 27, and a sealing ring 44. The end of the bellows fits between the hub 27a and the ring 44 and is engaged tightly thereby to form a seal. The bellows being so sealed individually to the cylinder 12 and the shaft 4 forms a connecting seal therebetween and thus prevents any leakage from the apparatus during the operation thereof.

Since the sealing element 42 is connected between the shaft and the cylinder element 12 it could, if desired, be used as the means for driving the cylinder element 12 and the heat exchanger 18. A relatively strong bellows element would be required for such use but if it is desired to simplify the apparatus by removing the other driving means, as for example the spokes 27 and the studs 28, the bellows may be used for that purpose. However, whether the sealing member or some mechanical arrangement, as that'shown, is used to drive the cylinder member, the driving means must, of course, allow for some relative motion between the shaft and the cylinder member since they rotate on different axes.

From the above, it will be seen that I have provided new and improved refrigerating apparatus forming a com plete refrigerating system with rotating heat exchangers. In this apparatus both the heat exchangers and the pump ing means are driven by a single motor. Further, the heat exchangers are so connected together within the apparatus that no flexible couplings other than the one sealing means are required. My novel pumping means is, of course, particularly adapted for this apparatus whereby in addition to serving as a pump it also serves as a means for rotating the one heat exchanger. Moreover, the pumping means, since it involves onlytwo moving parts is relatively fool-proof in operation and has the additional advantage of being inexpensive to produce and assemble.

While in accordance with the patent statutes I have described what at present is considered to be the preferred embodiment of my invention, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from my invention and I, therefore, aim in the appended claims to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of my invention.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

l. Refrigerating apparatus comprising a motor having a shaft, a cylinder member forming a pumping chamber, a pumping member positioned within said pumping cham ber, means rotatably mounting said members one on the axis of said shaft and the other about an axis offset from and parallel to said first axis, at least one reciprocating blade mounted on one of said members and engaging the other of said members, means for driving both of said members from said shaft thereby to effect a pumping action in said pumping chamber, a first heat exchanger mounted on said cylinder member for rotation therewith, a second heat exchanger mounted on said shaft for rotation therewith, one of said heat exchangers being connected to the inlet of said pumping chamber and the other of said heat exchangers being connected to the outlet of said pumping chamber, and means connecting together said heat exchangers whereby said unit operates as a complete closed refrigerating system with rotating heat exchangers.

2. Refrigerating apparatus comprising a motor having a shaft, a cylinder member forming a pumping chamber, a pumping member positioned within said pumping chamber, means rotatably mounting said members one on the axis of said shaft and the other about an axis offset from and parallel to said first axis, at least one reciprocating blade mounted on one of said members and engaging the other of said members, means for driving both of said members from said shaft at the same speed of rotation thereby to effect a pumping action in said pumping chamber, a condenser mounted on said cylinder member for rotation therewith and connected to the outlet of said pumping chamber, an evaporator mounted on said shaft for rotationttherewith and connected to the inlet of said pumping chamber, and expansion means connecting together said evaporator and said condenser whereby said unit operates as a complete closed refrigerating system with a rotating condenser and a rotating evaporator.

3. Refrigerating apparatus comprising a motor having a shaft, a cylinder member forming a pumping chamber, means rotatably mounting said cylinder member eccentrically of the axis of said shaft, a pumping member mounted on one end of said shaft and positioned within said pumping chamber, a least one reciprocating blade mounted on one of said members and engaging the other of said members, means for driving said cylinder member from said shaft at the same speed of rotation as said pumping member thereby to effect a pumping action in said pumping chamber, a condenser mounted on said cylinder member for rotation therewith and connected to the outlet of said pumping chamber, an evaporator mounted on said shaft for rotation therewith and connected to the inlet of said pumping chamber, and capillary expansion means connecting together said condenser and said evaporator whereby said unit operates as a complete closed refrigeration system having a rotating evaporator and a rotating condenser.

4. Refrigerating apparatus comprising a motor having a shaft, a cylinder member forming a pumping chamber, a pumping member positioned within said pumping chamber, means rotatably mounting said members one on the axis of said shaft and the other about an axis ofiset from and parallel to said first axis, at least one reciprocating blade mounted on one of said members and engaging the other of said members, means for driving both of said members from said shaft thereby to effect a pumping action in said pumping chamber, a flexible sealing member connected between said shaft and said cylinder member to prevent leakage from said pumping chamber, a first heat exchanger mounted on said cylinder member for rotation therewith, a second heat exchanger mounted on said shaft for rotation therewith, one of said heat exchangers being connected to the inlet of said pumping chamber and the other of said heat exchangers being connected to the outlet of said chamber, and means connecting together said heat exchangers whereby said unit operates as a complete closed refrigerating system with rotating heat exchangers.

5. Refrigerating apparatus comprising a motor having a shaft, a cylinder member forming a pumping chamber, means rotatably mounting said cylinder for rotation about an axis parallel to and offset from the axis of said shaft, a pumping member mounted on one end of said shaft for rotation therewith and positioned within said pumping chamber, at least one reciprocating blade mounted on one of said members and engaging the other of said members, means for driving said cylinder member from said shaft at the same speed of rotation as said pumping member thereby to efiect a pumping action in said pumping chamber, a flexible sealing member connected between said shaft and said cylinder member to prevent leakage from said apparatus, a condenser mounted on said cylinder member for rotation therewith and connected to the outlet of said pumping chamber, an evaporator mounted on said shaft for rotation therewith and connected to the inlet of said pumping chamber, and capillary expansion means connecting said condenser and said evaporator whereby said unit operates as a complete closed refrigerating system having a rotating evaporator and rotating condenser.

References Cited in the file of this patent FOREIGN PATENTS 289,088 Great Britain' Sept. 20, 1928

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3025684 *Jun 23, 1959Mar 20, 1962Mclain Robert SRefrigerating machine
US3134244 *Jan 15, 1962May 26, 1964George A BlaseLiquid chilling devices
US3139736 *May 14, 1962Jul 7, 1964George A BlaseVehicle air-conditioning units
US3347059 *Jul 18, 1966Oct 17, 1967Laing NikolausHeat pump
US3397739 *May 12, 1965Aug 20, 1968Sibany Mfg CorpHeat exchange apparatus
US3797270 *Jun 26, 1973Mar 19, 1974Physikalisch Tech EntwicklungsHeat pump with two fluid circuits
US3896635 *Feb 28, 1973Jul 29, 1975Stewart Robert CHeat transfer device and method of using the same
US3939907 *May 21, 1974Feb 24, 1976Skvarenina John ARotary compressor and condenser for refrigerating systems
US3973622 *Feb 10, 1975Aug 10, 1976Nikolaus LaingTemperature-control system with rotary heat exchangers
US5243836 *Feb 19, 1992Sep 14, 1993Buchi Laboratorium-Technik AgSealing device for a rotary evaporator
US6948328Feb 18, 2003Sep 27, 2005Metrologic Instruments, Inc.Centrifugal heat transfer engine and heat transfer systems embodying the same
US6964176Oct 4, 2002Nov 15, 2005Kelix Heat Transfer Systems, LlcCentrifugal heat transfer engine and heat transfer systems embodying the same
US7010929Oct 4, 2002Mar 14, 2006Kelix Heat Transfer Systems, LlcCentrifugal heat transfer engine and heat transfer systems embodying the same
US7093454Feb 25, 2003Aug 22, 2006Kelix Heat Transfer Systems, LlcCentrifugal heat transfer engine and heat transfer systems embodying the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/499
International ClassificationF25B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25B3/00
European ClassificationF25B3/00