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Publication numberUS2805615 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1957
Filing dateOct 4, 1954
Priority dateOct 4, 1954
Publication numberUS 2805615 A, US 2805615A, US-A-2805615, US2805615 A, US2805615A
InventorsEmil Rudy
Original AssigneeLoren Cook Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ventilators
US 2805615 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 10, 1957 E. RUDY VENTILATORS Filed Oct. 4, 1954 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 il a Si 5o A u Est@ *n m L FIG. I '5 4, /5 35m-l- 5 6 ab n; l

l? l5 I9 A /6 lo a [J9 Il 2l 47a,

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4 4o l 115.) INVENTOR. F|G 2 5 45 Y EMIL RUDY -l-I-'W l2 I E. RUDY VENTILATORS Sept. 10, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 4, 1954 INVENTOR. I I EMIL RUDY Sept. 10, 1957 E. RUDY 2,805,615

v VENTILATORS Filed Oct. 4, 1954 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. 60 EMIL RUDY Sept. 1o, 1957 Filed Oct. 4. 1954 E. RUDY VENTILATORS 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENToR. EMIL RUDY vnnrrtnroas Emil Rudy, Cleveiand, Ohio, assignor to Loren Cook Company, a corporation of Ohio Application October 4, 1954, Serial No. 459,9il3

8 Claims. (Cl. SiS-143) This invention relates to ventilators and more particularly to a ventilator which is adapted to be installed in a wall or upon the roof of a building to remove heated air, or air contaminated with smoke, dust, fumes, and odors, from the interior of the building or from rooms or oices therein.

It is now customary to provide ventilators for removing smoke and dust from high class factories vand the ofces therein, or excess heat, fumes, and odors from homes and restaurants, and particularly the kitchens thereof, and it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved ventilator Aof this type which is neat in appearance and which may be inserted in an opening in a side wall or around a pipe extending through an opening in the roof of the building and which is so constructed that heated air or air contaminated with dust, smoke, or fumes, may be eiiciently and quietly drawn from the interior of such rooms or buildings.

Another object of the invention is to providean improved ventilator including air moving means, such as an impeller or blower, for quietly and eiiciently withdrawing air from buildings or rooms therein and in which means are provided for permitting a portion of the air which is substantially free from contamination to ilow into contact with a motor for driving the air moving means.

A further object of the invention is to provide a ventilator including a motor in which improved means are provided for protecting the motor and the interior oi the ventilator from weather elements, such as rain or snow, Without in any manner detracting from the appearance of the ventilator or its efficiency in quietly drawing air from the interior of a room `or building.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved ventilator including a motor which is so constructed that air contaminated with smoke, dust, fumes, and odors, may be withdrawn or expelled from a building or rooms therein and in which'improved means are provided for drawing air from the atmosphere into contact with the motor while the contaminated air is being Withdrawn from the building.

The invention will be better understood by reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. l is a side elevational View of one form of the ventilator showing it attached to the side wall of a building, which building is shown in section with parts broken away;

Fig. 2 is a central cross sectional View of the ventilator shown in Fig. 1;

Figs. 3 and 4 are cross sectional views taken on planes passing through the lines 3-3 and fir-4, respectively, of Fig. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 5 is a view partly in elevation and partly in cross section lof another form of the ventilator, showing it secured to the side wall of a building which building is shown in section with parts broken away;

Fig. 6 is a cross sectional View taken on a plane passing Patented Sept. 10, 1957 2 through the line 6-'6 of Fig. 5, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 7 is a view partly in elevation and partly in section of another form of the Ventilator; and

Fig. 8 is a sectional View taken on a plane passing through the line 8-8 of Fig. 7, looking in the direction ot the arrows.

While the ventilators of the present invention are adapted to be applied around pipes extending through the wall of a building or through openings in any part of a building, as shown in Fig. 1 to 4 of the drawings, the ventilator is applied to a side wall 1 and includes conduit means 2 arranged in an opening in the side wall of a building, an extension `collar 3, a grid 4 secured to the extension collar and arranged within the building, an annular wall 5 having an youtwardly ilared portion, an annular supporting wall 6, an annular air directing and protective shield or balle 7, a motor 8, lair moving means 9, a plate 10 kfor supporting the motor, and a hood or.

cap 11 for protecting the motor from weather elements, such as rain or snow.

For securing the ventilator to the wall of a building, the annular supporting wall 6 is provided with an annular ange 12 extending outwardly from the axis of the ventilator which has spaced apertures therein for receiving screws or bolts 13 which may be threaded into wall 1 of the building. The supporting wall 6 is inclined outwardly from the wall of the building and inwardly relative to the axis of the ventilator and is provided with a ra* dially extending annular llange 14 and means associated with ange i4, plate 1li, and hood 11, are provided for supporting motor plate 1d in spaced relation to Wall 6 andl hood 11. For this purpose, a plurality of spaced threaded bolts 1S are provided, each of which extends through aligned apertures in a radially extending annular flange i6 on the inner portion of hood 11, the plate 1), a radially extending portion of wall 5, and the flange 14 of wall 6, and is held in place by a nut 17 arranged outwardly of and engaging flange 16 of the hood and a second nut 17a arranged inwardly of and engaging flange 14 of the supporting wall, and lfor spacing hood 11 from plate 10 to provide an annular opening between the motor plate and liange 16 of hood 11 through which air may flow into contact with the motor, a spacer 13 surrounds each bolt 15 between flange 16 and plate 10, and for maintaining plate it) in spaced relation to supporting wall 6, asecond spacer 19 surrounding each bolt is arranged between plate lil and the radially extending portion of wall 5.

The blower or impeller consists of a circular plate 20 having a depression 2dr! therein for strengthening purposes and secured to the `outer margin of plate 2li by suitable means, such as welding or by screws as shown more particularly in Fig. 8, are a plurality of vanes 21 which are arranged in spaced relation to each other and are inclined relative to a plane passing through the central axis of the ventilator as shown more particularly in Fig. 4. The number of vanes will of course depend upon the size of the ventilator. For small ventilators utilized in ykitchens and restaurants, twelve vanes are usually sufficient.

The impeller or blower 9 is rotated by means of the motor 8 which is mounted upon plate l!) in any suitable manner. As shown, a plurality of bolts 22 secured to the motor extend through apertures in the plate and are secured thereto by nuts 22a. The inotor is also secured to plate 2i) of theA air moving means and for this purpose the shaft of the motor extends through an aperture in the motor plate 10 and an Yaperture in plate 20 of the air moving means and `is threaded to receive a nut 23.

As shown in Figs. l to 4, a damper 24 is arranged in conduit meanskZ. While thedamper 24 may be pivotal- 1y` supported in conduit means 2 in .any desirable manner, as shown, a collar 25 which may be welded or otherwise secured to conduit means 2 has an inwardly extending annular `flange-26 vproviding 'an opening and a pintle 27 extending through knuckles formed onadjacent portionsnfithe `damper hasf-oppositely extending end portions pivotally mounted in bosses 28 extendinginwardly from collar 125. The damper is pivotally mounted at points on the collar which are spaced radially outwardly a considerable distance from the central axis of the ventilator and the lower portion of the damper which is arranged between the pivot ypoints and the adjacent wall is provided with a weight V29 which urges the damper to its closed position Ywhen the ventilator is idle. When the motor is energized, lhowever, and the blower is rotated, the .damper is moved to a partly `or fully open position depending upon the speed at which the motor is rotated. In Fig. x1, the damper is shown in full lines in its closed position and indotted lines in its partly open position.

In kaccordance with the present invention, the ywall 5, the outer periphery of the motor plate, bathe 7, and hood `11, are so arranged that'air drawn from the interior of the building or from rooms or otlices therein, may be quietly and etliciently expelled to the atmosphere. As illustrated in Fig. 2, conduit means 2 terminates inwardly of wall 1 and wall 5 is provided with an inwardly extending annular tlange 30 which surrounds and is held in place by the outer end portion of conduit means 2 to which it maybe secured by suitabley means, such as welding. The annular `wall 5 extends outwardly from wall 1 and to build up pressure and to avoid air turbulence at the inlet of the blower or impeller, wall 6 is provided with an annular inwardly curved or arcuate-shaped portion 31 into which the inner ends of vanes; 21 extend, and to deiiect and guide the air through the ventilator and to prevent turbulence, wall, 5 is provided with a portion which is curved outwardly relative to the axis of the ventilator. Wall 5 is also provided with a radially extending portion 33 which overlies tlange 14 of wall 6 and is apertured to receive the bolts 15 extending through spacers 18 and 19, or, if desired, the aperture in wall 5 may be of suflieieut size to receive the lower end portion of spacer 19. It is not necessary, however, that the outer periphery of wall Sshall extend beyond plate 10. To further direct the path of the air and to prevent the entrance of rain or snow into the motor compartment formed by the hood l1, the periphery of the motor plate 10 is curved outwardly from wall 1 as indicated by the numeral 34 and the periphery offlange 16 `of hood 11 is curved inwardly as indicated by the numeral 35.

The baille 7 and the hood 11 'are arranged in such relation to each other that the contaminated air will be expelled quietly and eiciently from the interior of a roomor building withoutrturbulence. For this purpose, the annular shield or baffle 7 is spaced from the ilaring wallS and is curved outwardly relative to wall 1 and inwardly relative to the axis of the ventilator. Hood 11 also extends outwardly and is inclined inwardly toward the axis of the ventilator.

The shield or batile 7 is formed separately from wall 5 and is supported in position in any desired manner. As Shown, a plurality of spacers 36 are arranged between `the outer end portion of wall 5 and the inner portion of shield or baille 7 which are secured in place by suitable means, such as bolts 36a, each of which extends through a central opening in each spacer. It will ,be noted that by removing bolts 36a and nuts 17, the baffle and hood may be removed to provide access to the motor for cleaning or oiling it or for making `repairs thereon.

To enable the motor to be energized, conduit means are provided through which electrical conductors ,may be passed from the interior of the building to the motor 8. As shown, the conduit means includes a tube 37, the outer end of which extends through"` an aperture in plate 10 and `the inner end of which extends through apertures in walls 5 and 6 and terminates in a connector 38 arranged within a chamber 39 formed by walls 5 and 6 and suitable conduit means liti extends through an opening in wall 1, the outer end of which is secured to connector 38. To prevent the passage of tube 37 through apertures in plate 10 and walls 5 and 6, suitable nuts or collars 41 and 42 are provided, collar 41 being in engagement with the motor plate 10 and collar 42 being in engagement with the outer side of wall 5.

In the construction shown, when motor 8 is energized, it rotates the blower including vanes 21 and air is drawn through grid 4 and conduit means 2, the force of which, moves damper 24 to its partly or fully open position, depending upon the speed of the motor, and it is then forced by vanes 21 as indicated by the arrows A against thc curved portion of wall 5 which deflects the air outwardly against the daring portion of wall 5 and between battle 7 and hood 11 to the atmosphere in a quiet and eicient manner. The motor of course will be heated to a certain extent during operation and a portion of that stratum of 'the air which is adjacent the annular opening 43 between flange 16 of hood 11 and the peripheral ilange on plate 10 will ow around motor 8 which will be cooled thereby. It will be noted that the rapid rotation of the vanes will throw the dust and other solid particles outwardly `against the inner surface of the curved portion of wall 5 and consequently that portion of the air which flows aroundthe motor will be comparatively free from dust and other solid particles.

The inner supporting wall 6, the outwardly flaring portion of wall 5, fand baffle 7 as thus arranged for directing air outwardlyfrom the ventilator also serve to protect the motor Vand the-interior portion of the ventilator from weather elements, such as rain or Snow. lt will `be noted that the inner supporting wall 6 and the curved portion of wall 5 meet at an acute angle to provide a valley 44 so that rain falling against the outer side of the curved and flaring portions of wall 5 or upon the supporting wall 6, or water formed by the melting of snow or ice deposited thereon, will low into the valley 44 and will drain from the lower portion of the ventilator and to prevent water fromseeping between the supporting wall 6 and the outwardly flaring portion of wall 5, an annular inwardly extending bead 45 is provided on wall 6 inwardly of the junction point of walls 5 and 6 in which a call;- ing compound 46 may be inserted, and if desired, walls 5 and 6 may be welded together adjacent the bead 45 as indicated by the numeral 45a. Rain falling upon, or water formed from melting snow or ice deposited on the upper outer` surface of hood 11, will `drain outwardly and downwardly over the hood andin a like manner rain falling upon'or water formed from melting snow or ice deposited on the outer uppersurface of' bale 7 will drain on to hood 11, the outer portion of which hood is substantially flat. to Venable water to drain therefrom. Any rain or water formed from snow or ice which is deposited by gusts of wind on the inner surface of bathe r7 will of course drain downwardly around the inner surface of the bafe and will escape through the annular opening 47 between the bafe 7 and the outwardly flaring portion of wall 5.

The conduit 'means 2 is of suilicient length to lit within the walls of minimum thickness and the collar 3 is adjustable inwardly when the wall is of greater thickness. For securingthe collar 3 and the grid 4 in place, the collar isprovided with a flange 47a extending axially outwardly from the `collar and in a like manner the, grid d is provided with an annular liange d3 extending outwardly fromits axis, the peripheral portion of which isturned outwardly as indicated by the numeral 49 to obscure the flanged end of the collar and the collar and grid may be secured to the inner side of the building wall by suitable means, such `as screws 5l). The grid 4 has an ornamental appearance and is so constructed that it will cause a uniform distribution of the air through the conduit means 2.

Another modication of the ventilator is shown in Figs. 5 and 6 of the drawing which is somewhat similar to that shown in Figs. 1 to 4 and corresponding parts have accordingly been designated by the same reference numerals as shown in Figs. l to 4. In this modification, however, the motor plate consists of a dish-shaped member having a bottom wall 51 on which the motor 8 is mounted and an annular side wall 52 which is inclined outwardly from wall 1 and from the axis of the ventilator and terminates in a substantially radially extending portion 53 provided with spaced apertures to receive bolts 54 as shown in Fig. 6 of the drawings, each of which bolts also extends through aligned apertures in the ange 55 of the hood or cap 5'6 and the radially extending portion 33 of wall 5. The spacing tubes 18 and 19 are similar to those shown in Figs. 1 to 4. in this modiiication, however, each spacing tube 19 extends through an aperture in the radially extending portion 33 of wall S and each bolt S4 extends through aligned apertures in ange 55 of hood 56, the radially extending portion 53 of the motor plate, and the radially extending portion 14 of wall 6 and is secured in place by means of a Inut 17 which engages ilange 55 and a nut 17a which engages the radially extending portion 14 of wall 6.

ln the modification shown in Figs. 5 and 6, the shield or baiiie 57 extends downwardly over the outwardly ilaring portion of wall 55 and is maintained in spaced relation thereto by means of a plurality of spaced straps 5d, one end `of each of which is provided with an aperture through which one of the bolts 54 extends and which is held in place adjacent the radially extending portion 53 of the motor plate by means of one of the spacers 59. Each of the straps is then inclined inwardly relative to wall 1 and outwardly relative to the axis of the ventilator as indicated by the numeral 59 and then extends inwardly in a direction substantially perpendicular to wall 1. The inner portion of baille 57 issubstantially perpendicular to wall 1 and the inwardly extending portion of each strap is secured to the baiiie by suitable means, such as a bolt 6d.

In the ventilator shown in Figs. 5 and 6, it is apparent that the weight of motor 7, the hood 56, and the baffle or shield 57, is borne by supporting wall 6 and conscquently there is no danger that the outwardly Haring wall 5'6 will be forced out of alignment with conduit 2. The axis of the motor, the blower, and the hood will therefore always be maintained in alignment with the axis of the conduit means 2. Because the inner portion of battle 57 is arranged substantially perpendicular to wall il, it will also be apparent that rain falling against the inner poru tion of the outer surface of battle 57 and the outer surfa'e of wall 6 will drain into the valley i4 and will tlow to the bottom of the ventilator. Rain carried by gusts of wind or water formed by the melting of any snow or ice deposited on the inner surface of baiiie 57 will drain oft through the annular opening between baffle 57 and wail 56 and rain falling against or water formed by the melting of snow or ice deposited upon the outer surface of the outer portion of bao S7 will iiow upon hood 56 and will drain therefrom and in a like manner rain or water formed from melting snow or ice. deposited upon the upper surface of hood 56 will ow on to the flat outer end portion of the hood and will drain therefrom. ln this modification, it will be noted that the outer portion of baiiie 57 extends outwardly to a distance which approximates the outer end` portion ofthe hood so that the interior portion ofthe ventilator will be substantially protected against lthe entrance of weather elements, such as snow, rain, or ice.

Another modification of the invention is shown in Figs. 7 and 8 of the drawings which is particularly designed for application to the roof of a building around a pipe extending throughthe roof; As shown, the ventilator comprises conduit means 6,1, a base 62, anannularV supporting wall 63, a motor 64, a hood or cap 65 for the motor, an annular baille or shield 66, and air moving means 67, such as an impeller or blower.

The blower includes a plate 68 having a depressed central portion 63a for strengthening purposes, and a plurality of vanes 69 which are secured to the peripheral margin of plate 6d by suitable means, such as screws 70, and is rotated by means of a motor 64 to which it may be secured by any suitable means. As shown, motor 64 is mounted upon a plate 71 arranged outwardly of plate 68 and is provided with a shaft 72 which extends through apertures in plates 71 and 68 and is threaded to receive a nut 73.

To prevent air from the outside atmosphere from entering the building when a circuit to the motor is interrupted, damper means are provided in conduit 61. The damper means consists of a :collar 7d which may be welded or otherwise secured to the interior of conduit means 61 and from which extends an annular rib 75 forming an opening and a damper 76 is provided to which is secured a pintie 77, the opposite ends of which are mounted in bosses extending inwardly from the collar at a substantial distance outwardly from the axis of the conduit means as shown more particularly in Fig. 6 of the drawing, and means are provided for maintaining the damper in closed position when the electrical circuit to the motor is interrupted. For this purpose, a stop 78 secured to rib 75 is provided which prevents the shorter end portion of the damper from moving upwardly beyond the rib 7S and a weight 79 is secured to the opposite end of the damper for urging it to closed position.

The annular supporting wall 63 is provided with an annular ange 8G which surrounds conduit means 61 and is secured thereto in any suitable manner, such as vby welding. Supporting wall 63 is also provided with an annular curved or arcuate-shaped portion 81 which forms an annular recess into which the lower ends of vanes 69 of the blower extend to provide a pressure area between the conduit means 61 and the vanes of the blower when the blower is being rotated. The upper portion of wall 63 terminates in an outwardly extending iiange S2 and means associated with ange 82, plate 71, air deflector 66, and hood 65, are provided for maintaining them in spaced, relation to each other. For this purpose, the hood 65 is provided with an outwardly extending annular portion 83 which is substantially flat and which has spaced apertures therein, the air deector 66 is provided with a substantially annular portion 84 having spaced apertures therein, the outer periphery or plate 71 and annular flange 82 of the supporting wall are each provided with a plurality of spaced apertures, and each aperture in flange 83 of the hood is in alignment with an aperture in the outwardly extending portion 84 of the air deilector 66, an aperture in plate 71, and an aperture in flange 82, and a series of threaded bolts 85 are provided, each `of which extends through each series of aligned apertures, the upper end of each bolt being secured in place by means of a nut 86 and the lower end of each bolt being secured in place by means of a nut 87, and a first series of tubular spacing members S8 are provided,

each of which surrounds one of the bolts S5 and is ar ranged between flanged?, and the outwardly extending portion 84 of air deilector 66, and in a like manner, a

second series of tubular spacing members 89 are provided, each or" which surrounds one ofthe bolts and is arranged between plate 71 and the dat portion 84 'of the air deiiector, and a third series of tubular spacing members 90 are provided, each of which surrounds a bolt 85 and is arranged between of supporting wall 63.

The air delecting means 65 is so constructed that air contaminated with dust, smoke, and fumes, may be quietly and eiciently expelled from a room or building. For this purpose, the air detlectorris provided with anA annular curved portion 491 to deiiect the air Vdownwardly plate 71 and the flange 82 t in the ventilator and damper 76 is moved to its open or partly open position as shown in dotted lines and contaminated air from the interior of the building, orfrom `oilices or rooms therein, is drawn into conduit means 61 and is forced `outwardly by the blower. The air'passing outwardly through `the blower is deilected downwardly by the curved portion 91 ofthe deector and `is then passed outwardly through the ilaring portion 92. The path of the air stream is indicated by theiarrows B.

The force of the air moving outwardly and downwardly also creates an area of lowpressure around motor 64 and air from the atmosphere is drawn inwardly through the annular opening 93 between hood 63` and the flat-portion 84 of the deilector and for directing the air in contact with the motor, the upper end of the deilector extends inwardly as indicated by the numeral 94 and then upwardly and is provided with an arcuate-shaped annular portion 95, the outer end-portion of which terminates in a cylindrical wall 96 which surrounds motor 64. When the blower is in operation, the air is therefore drawn inwardly through annular opening 93 and passes upwardly between the hood and the portion 95 and wall 96 of the deflector and ilows into contact with and cools the motor 64. It then ilows downwardly and is dellected `outwardly by the arcuate-shaped portion 95 of the deilector and by the motor plate 71, the periphery of which has a downwardly and outwardly curved portion 97 to prevent turbulence. The path of the air drawn in through the annular openingv 93 and its passage between hood 65 and wall 96 and between'wall 96 and motor 64 is designated by the arrows C.

To prevent rain or snow -from being drawn inwardly around the motor, the outwardly extending periphery of llange 83 is also curved downwardly as indicated by the numeral 83a. The upwardly extending portion and the cylindrical wall 96 of the deilector also prevent rain or snow from being drawn into contact with the motor.

The base 72 of the ventilator is provided with an upwardly inclined portion 9S which terminates in an annular collar 99 which may be secured to conduit means 61 in any desirable manner, such as by welding, and the lower portion of the base terminates in an annular ilange 100. The curved portions ^`98 and 100 prevent water `from settling on the base of the ventilator.

Conduit means are also provided for leading electrical conduits to the motor. For this purpose, pipe 101 is provided which is secured to the base by nuts 102 and 103. The pipe passes throughan aperture in ilange 82 i and issecured by nuts 104 and 105 to the motor plate 71.

What is claimed is: 1. A ventilator for application to the side `wall-of `a building having an opening therein, said ventilator comprising conduit means disposed in said opening, an air directing wall having` an annular llange surrounding the outer end portion of said conduit means and an annular portion which is flared outwardly relative to the side Wall of the building, aicircular motor supporting plate spacedoutwardly relative to the building, means forsupporting `the motor supporting plate at a predetermined distance from said side wall, air moving means arranged inwardly of said plate relative to `the building, a motor mountedon said plate land 4extending outwardly `therefrom relative to said building and said motor being operatively secured to said, air movingmeans, a hood for said rn'otor having a portion which is tapered `inwardly relative to the axis of the motor and outwardly relative `to said building, and the llan'ng portion Yolf said wall being spaced outwardly relative to `the axis ofsaid `motor at a sulllcient distance from the periphery kof said motor supporting` plate .to provide a path between the periphery of said plate and the outwardly ilaring portion of said wall through which air is directed by said air moving means, an annular baille extending outwardly from the tlaring portion of said wall relative to said building for protecting the interior of the ventilator from weather elements and said baille being spaced `outwardly from said hood relative to the axis of said ventilator "butbeing curved inwardly toward the tapered portion of the `hood for directing air passing between the aring portion of the air directing wall and the motor supporting plate away from said building between said baille and hood, and means for supporting said baille in place.

2. Apparatus as defined in claim l in which the means for supporting the baille in place consists of a plurality of straps, one end of each `of which is connected to uthe motor supporting plate and the other end of each of which is connected to said baille.

3. Apparatus as deiined in claim l in which a portion of said baille is arranged in proximity to but is spaced outwardly from the flaring portion of the air directing wall relative to the axis of the ventilator to permit rain and water formed from melting snow and ice whichis deposited on the inner side wall of the baille to flow between the baille and the outwardly flaring portion of the air directing wall.

4. Apparatus as dened in claim 2 in whichsaid baille has an innerportion arranged in spaced relation to the outwardly ilaring portion of the air directing wall and in which the means for supporting the baille in place consists of a plurality ofieonnectors, each of which extends `through the baille and the outwardly ilaring portion of said wall and in which means associated with each connector is provided for maintaining the inner portion of the batlle in spaced relation to the outwardly flaring portion of said wall.

5. A ventilator for application to a building having `an opening therein, said ventilator comprising conduit means disposed in said opening, a wall having an annular flange surrounding the outer end portion of said conduit means and an annular portion which is llared outwardly relative to said building, a circular motor supporting plate spaced outwardly from the building, a motor supported by said plate and extending `outwardly therefrom relative to the building, a hood for said motor having an annular portion which is tapered inwardly relative to the axis of the ventilator and outwardly relative to the building and an inner annular flange arranged in parallel relation with a portion of said plate, means for supporting and maintaining the motor supporting plate at a predetermined distance from said wall, air moving means arranged inwardly of the motor supporting plate relative to the building, means for operatively securing the motor to said air moving means, and the flaring portion of Ysaid wall being spaced outwardlyv relative to the axis of the ventilator 4at a snfllcient distance from the periphery of said plate to provide a path between said plate and the ilaring portion of said wall through which air is directed by said air moving means away from the building, and means for supporting said hood in spaced relation to said motor supporting yplate to provide an annular opening between the flange of said hood and said plate through which a portion of the stratum or"` air directed outwardly from the ventilator passes to cool the motor.

6. Apparatus as deiined in claim 5 in which the hood is spaced from the motor to form a motor compartment and in which the peripheral portion of the motor supporting plate is curved outwardly relative to the` building so that the air will be passed outwardly away from the building between the curved peripheral portion of the motor supporting plate and the ilaring portion of the wall without turbulence and in which the outer periphery of the flange of said hood isy curved inwardly `toward the outwardly curved portion of the motor supporting plate to prevent rain and other weather elements from passing into the motor compartment.

7. A ventilator for application to the side wall of a building having an opening therein, conduit means dis posed in said opening, an air directing wall having an annular ange surrounding the outer end portion of said conduit means, an annular portion which 'extends radially outwardly relative to the axis of the ventilator and a portion which is ared outwardly relative to the side Wall of the building, a circular motor supporting plate which is spaced outwardly relative to the side wall of the building, air moving means arranged inwardly of said plate with respect to the side wall of the building, means for supporting said plate in spaced relation to the air directing wall, a motor mounted on said plate, means for operatively securing the motor to the air moving means and the aring portion of said air directing wall being spaced outwardly relative to the axis of the ventilator at a suicient distance from the periphery of the motor lsupporting plate to provide a path between the outer periphery of said plate and the outwardly aring portion of the air directing wall through which air is forced away from the building by said air moving means when an electrical circuit is established to the motor, and an annular supporting wall having a portion secured to the building and an annular flange engaging the radially extending portion of the air directing wall to provide a support therefor and to form a valley between the supporting wall and the outwardly aring portion of the air directing wall into which water may flow and drain from the lower portion of the ventilator.

8. Apparatus as defined in claim 7 in which the means for supporting the motor supporting plate in spaced relation to the air directing wall is arranged between the annular ange of the annular supporting wall and said plate.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,767,988 Knapp June 24, 1930 2,188,741 Roberts Jan. 30, 1940 2,355,836 Willey Aug. 15, 1944 2,526,290 Solzman Oct. 17, 1950 2,548,607 Jenn Apr. 10, 1951 2,666,378 Ammerman Jan. 19, 1954

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2912916 *Dec 26, 1958Nov 17, 1959Chelsea Products IncVentilator devices
US3011423 *Nov 3, 1958Dec 5, 1961G C Breidert CoVentilator construction
US3040646 *Mar 11, 1959Jun 26, 1962Robertson Co H HRoof ventilator
US3045579 *Dec 7, 1959Jul 24, 1962Jenn Air Products Company IncVertical discharge roof exhauster
US3053165 *Oct 15, 1959Sep 11, 1962Colt Ventilation LtdUpward discharge ventilators
US3122088 *Nov 1, 1961Feb 25, 1964Swartwout Fabricators IncRoof ventilator
US3202080 *Oct 5, 1962Aug 24, 1965Loren Cook CompanyVentilators
US3302551 *Jun 22, 1964Feb 7, 1967Kool O Matic CorpVentilator
US3412670 *Dec 20, 1966Nov 26, 1968Jenn Air CorpRoof ventilator
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Classifications
U.S. Classification454/350, 415/226, 454/353, 415/214.1
International ClassificationF04D17/00, F04D17/16
Cooperative ClassificationF24F7/025, F04D17/165
European ClassificationF04D17/16F, F24F7/02B