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Publication numberUS2806312 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1957
Filing dateAug 17, 1954
Priority dateAug 17, 1954
Publication numberUS 2806312 A, US 2806312A, US-A-2806312, US2806312 A, US2806312A
InventorsJoseph Grumbacher
Original AssigneeGrumbacher Inc M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paint holder
US 2806312 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P 1957 J. GRUMBACHER 2,806,312

PAINT HOLDER Filed Aug. 17, 1954 lNVENTbR J58 eph Grumbac hep BY MWM ATTORNEYS United States Patent ()fiice 2,806,312 Patented Sept. 17, 1957 PAINT HOLDER Joseph Grumbacher, New York, N. Y., assignor to M. Grumbacher, Inc., New York, N. 23., a corporation of New York Application August 17, 1954, Serial No. 45%,449'

2 Claims. (Cl. 41-5) This invention relates to a paint tray and more particularly to a holder for paint buttons or slabs.

Heretofore in the manufacture of paint trays wherein it was desired to maintain painting material, such as a paint button, in position in the tray, it was necessary to prepare the tray having recesses adapted to receive the paint button and thereafter coat the tray with glue so that the button would remain in position and not inadvertently fall out of the recess in the tray. It will be realized that this made for additional cost in the preparation of the tray itself because of the material and labor cost required by this operation. This procedure was necessary as it is completely undesirable to have the button susceptible to inadvertently falling from the recess when used causing dam-age to the floor and to the button itself.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a tray for holding paint material and the like which will prevent inadvertent removal of the paint button from the tray.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a tray for holding paint material in the form of buttons or slabs, which will hold said paint material tightly against inadvertent removal without using adhering means such as glue or other adhesive.

It is a further object of the present invention to eliminate the necessity of the additional labor requirements necessitated by the use of the separate operation in applying the glue to the .paint tray to hold the paint material in place.

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide a paint tray for holding paint materials, having all the desired advantages which nevertheless is inexpensive to manufacture and easy to produce.

Other objects and advantages are set forth in greater detail in the accompanying specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a broken-away face view of the paint tray of the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a section taken along the lines 22 of Fig. l;and

Fig. 3 is a broken-away face view of a modified form of the paint tray of the present invention.

Referring to the drawings, there is shown a paint button holder comprising a tray 11 preferably of yieldable material, such as soft plastic having thin walls. While the tray is designated as comprising a plastic material, it will be understood that any yieldable material may be utilized in pursuing this invention. The tray is provided with flanges 12 around the perimeter of the tray which may be grasped by the user and held firm for the painting operation. A plurality of recesses 13 are provided in the tray during the molding or other manufacturing operation thereof which are adapted to receive a closely fitted slab of paint material such as a paint button 14.

Heretofore to eliminate the possibility of the paint material inadvertently falling from the recesses in the tray, which it will be understood was always possible in the absence of separate adhering means between the walls of the recess and the outer perimeter of the paint button 14, it was necessary to place glue in the recess and/or on the base of the paint button in order that the paint button would be adhered within the recess. According to the present invention, however, the necessity for the requirement for using glue or other adhering means has been eliminated.

I have provided in the inner walls 15 of the recess a plurality of inward projections 16 preferably located near the top 17 of the recess. The projections 16 are preferably yieldable and are formed of the same material as the material of the tray 11 itself. These projections are formed during the molding or other manufacturing operations of the tray and are adapted to frictionally engage the slab of paint material and retain the same in the recess. It will thus be seen that I have provided retaining mean-s preventing the inadvertent removal of the :paint =button without having separate pointed prongs over the top of the recess, which latter may break away, or having separate tabs adapted to overlap the top of the recess, which latter are expensive to apply and do not always function in the proper manner. The retaining means of the present invention are an integral part of the tray and recess.

When it is desired to remove the button, it is merely necessary to grasp the tray pressing the underside of the recess and with the exertion of a little force, the button may be removed from the recess. However, it has been found that the tray can be turned upside-down or otherwise abused without the button falling from the recess inadvertently.

While the projections are shown as two projections opposite each other in the recess, it will be understood that a plurality of projections around the walls of the recess may be utilized if desired. The projections as shown are substantially horizontal in the walls of the recess.

in the modification shown in Fig. 3, the tray 11 also has a recess 13 and it is constructed in the same fashion as the tray shown in Figs. 1 and 2. However, the yieldable projections 18 are on a substantially diagonal plane. It has been found that the paint buttons will be held properly in place if the projections are on a substantial diagonal running from somewhere in the middle of the side walls of the recess to the top thereof. The function of the projections in this fashion is equivalent to the functions of the horizontal projections shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

While the invention has been described in some detail, it will be understood that variations and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.

"I claim:

1. In combination, a paint holder and a slab of paint material carried thereby, said slab being of solid substance, and said paint holder comprising a resilient and yieldable tray formed of relatively thin soft yieldable sheet material, said tray having a raised surface and having an integral cup-like recess disposed in said raised surface and adapted to receive and closely fit said slab of paint material, the walls of said recess being provided with integral resilient and yieldable, short, mound-like inward oppositely disposed projections adapted to frictionally engage an upper portion of the slab of paint material and retain the same in the recess, the bottom of said slab being in engagement with the bottom wall of the cup-like recess, said inward projections being disposed closer to the said raised surface than to the bottom of the recess, and the side walls of the recess carrying said projections being substantially perpendicular to a plane passing through the mouth of the recess, said bottom recess wall being flexible and displaceable upwardly to eject the slab of paint material from the recess.

2. In combination, a paint holder and a slab of paint material carried thereby, said slab being of solid substance, and said paint holder comprising a resilient and yieldable tray formed of relatively thin, soft, yieldable sheet material, said tray having a raised surface and having an integral cup-like recess disposed in said raised surface and adapted to receive and closely fit said slab of paint material, the walls of said recess 'being provided with a short, integral, resilient and yield able mound-like inward projection adapted to fricti-onally engage an upper portion of the slab of paint material and retain the same in the recess, the bottom ofsaid sl'ab being in engagement with the bottom wall of the cup-like recess,-said' inward projection being disposed closer to the said raised surface than to the bottom of the recess, and the side walls of the recess carrying said projection being substantially perpendicular to a plane passing through the mouth of the recess, said bottom recess wall being flexible and displaceable upwardly to eject the slab of paint material from the recess.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,424,898 Pressman July 29, 1947 2,676,428 Silver Apr. 27, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 139,339 Austria Nov. 10, 1934

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2424898 *Jun 13, 1945Jul 29, 1947Jacob PressmanPaint cup
US2676428 *May 17, 1951Apr 27, 1954Silver Stan MOil painting kit
AT139339B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2878061 *Oct 22, 1957Mar 17, 1959Puro Co IncMoth preventive and deodorant dispensers
US3089584 *May 13, 1960May 14, 1963Joseph Dixon Crucible CoTray for water color paint box
US4826014 *Jun 7, 1988May 2, 1989Revlon, Inc.Compact case with interchangeable cosmetic inserts
US5325958 *Feb 4, 1993Jul 5, 1994Western Publishing Co., Inc.Combination paint tray and storage box
US7878212 *May 1, 2006Feb 1, 2011Modapack S.R.L.Supporting plate for cosmetic products
US20080190443 *May 1, 2006Aug 14, 2008Modapack S.R.L.Supporting Plate for Cosmetic Products
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/1.7, 206/1.8
International ClassificationB44D3/04
Cooperative ClassificationB44D3/04
European ClassificationB44D3/04