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Publication numberUS2806473 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1957
Filing dateNov 23, 1953
Priority dateNov 23, 1953
Publication numberUS 2806473 A, US 2806473A, US-A-2806473, US2806473 A, US2806473A
InventorsLingley Robert C
Original AssigneeMac Gregor Instr Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hypodermic and like syringes, needles for use therewith, and connections therebetween
US 2806473 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 17, 1957 R. 'c. LINGLEY HYPODERMIC AND LIKE SYRINGES. NEEDLES FOR USE THEREJWITH AND CONNECTIONS THEREBETWEEN 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 25, 1953 p ,1957 R. c. LINGLEY 2,806,473

' HYPODERMIC AND LIKE SYRINGES. NEEDLES FOR USE THEREWITH AND CONNECTIONS THEREBETWEEN Filed Nov. 25, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 12111 223024 flofrefli LCLiiggZqg,

United States Patent HYPODERh/IIC AND LIKE SYRINGES, NEEDLES FOR USE THEREWITH, AND CONNECTIONS THEREBETWEEN Robert C. Lingley, Waltham, Mass., assignor to Man Gregor Instrument Company, Needham, Iviasa, a corporation of Massachusetts Application November 23, 1953, Serial No. 393,811

8 Claims. (Cl. 128218) This invention relates to hypodermic syringes and the like and particularly to means enabling needles to be quickly and easily attached thereto.

It has long been recognized that a frictional connection between a needle and its syringe is not always adequate and it is common practice, particularly with syringes of the cartridge type, to provide for the locking of a needle to a syringe by means of a rotatable connection. In addition, in the case of syringes of the cartridge type, there is the important problem of avoiding loss of the sterility of the seal piercing end of the cannula as it is being attached to the syringe.

The principal objective of this invention is to provide means by which a needle may be securely locked to a syringe by a resilient clip to provide an easily operated and positive connection that, in the case of syringes of the cartridge type, ensures needle sterility in critical portions thereof.

In accordance with the invention, each needle has a hub remote from its tissue piercing end and the syringe bodies each have a seat in their distal end which effects communication with the interior thereof and which are dimensioned to receive and partly expose the needle hubs. Each syringe body carries a resilient clip which includes a part to engage a hub and this part is preferably in the form of a pair of fingers spaced apart to receive the cannula between them. Each clip is attached to its syringe body for movement into and out of a position in which it engages and resiliently seats a needle hub positioned in the syringe seat.

Each needle may be manually held by its cannula, on the distal side of but closely adjacent its hub, as its hub is deposited in the syringe seat and the clip may be quickly and easily snapped into position to securely lock the hub in place with seating pressure being applied by it axially towards the syringe body. Needles for use with cartridge syringes have their hubs between their seal and tissue piercing points and the body of such a syringe is typically in the form of a shell which receives the cartridge. With such a body, the seat establishes a relatively large opening in the distal end of the shell which enables the seal piercing end of a needle to be passed readily therethrough without contact with any part of the body.

In the accompanying drawings, there are shown illustrative embodiments of the invention from which these and other of its objectives, novel features, and advantages will be readily apparent.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary, enlarged view in elevation of a syringe body of the cartridge type with a needle attached thereto;

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1' but with the body turned 90 from its position in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a section taken approximately along the indicated lines 33 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a view of the body and attached needle as seen.

from its distal end;

Fig. 5 is an elevational view of the needle;

ice

Fig. 6 is an elevational view of a hypodermic syringe body with a needle attached thereto;

Fig. 7 is a like view but with the syringe body turned 90 from its Fig. 6 position and the needle holding dip released;

Fig. 8 is a section taken along the indicated lines 88 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 9 is a View of the hypodermic syringe body and attached needle as viewed from its distal end;

Fig. 10 is a section taken along the indicated lines 1010 of Fig. 8; and

Fig. 11 is an elevational view of the needle shown in Figs. 6-10.

As has been stated above, the invention is applicable to the connection of needles to all types of syringe bodies. By the term syringe body or bodies, as used herein, is meant that part of a syringe in which either a liquid or a cartridge filled therewith is to be contained. Syringe bodies vary considerably and that type illustrated in Figs. 1-4 will first be described.

A cartridge type of syringe 'has its body in the form of a shell 15 which slidably receives a cartridge, not

4 shown, but which, as is well known in the art, consists of a cylindrical member with the liquid being held between spaced seals. A hypodermic needle for use with a cartridge type of syringe consists of a cannula such as that indicated at 16 having a tissue piercing point 17 and a seal piercing point 18 between which there is commonly located a bead engageable by locking means to secure the needle to the syringe body with its point 18 in position to so pierce the proximate cartridge seal as to enable its contents to be discharged when the plunger, not shown, is actuated.

In accordance with the invention, the shell 15 has its distal end provided with a seat 19 (see Fig. 3 which effects communication therethrough. The seat 19 is sh-own'as outwardly tapering and of such size that the seal piercing end of the cannula 16 may be passed freely and easily therethrough Without contact therewith which contact might result in loss of sterility of that portion. The needle is shown as having a hub generally indicated at 20 and preferably having a portion 21 of frusto-conic form dimensioned to fit the seat 19 to expose its rounded portion 22. 7

Attached as at 23 to the shell 15 are the arms 24 of a resilient clip shown as including a pair of fingers 25 spaced apart to receive the cannula 16 between them and to engage with the exposed hub portion 22, such fingers preferably being convex with respect to that hub portion. The clip also includes an intermediate part26 which is angul'arly disposed with respect to the fingers 25 and provides a digitally engageable shoulder 27.

It will be apparent that a'needle such as has been described may be quickly and easily positioned with its hub 20 entrant of the seat 19 and the clip swung into the position shown in the drawings in which the hub is resiliently seated with seating pressure being axially applied towards the shell 15. While the needle is thus firmly secured, it may be released with maximum ease and convenience by digitally applied pressure on the shoulder 27.

With reference to Figs. 6-10, it will be noted that the syringe body illustrated therein is shown as comprising a barrel 28, typically of glass,'and an integral tip. 29 to which is attached a metal tip 30 so spaced from the distal end of the barrel as to establish a pair of spaced shoulders 31 and 32 between which an annular portion of the tip 29 is exposed. Y

The tip 29 has a bore 33 extending therethrough by which the bore 34 of the metal tip 30 is placed in communication with the interior of the barrel 28 from which the liquid is discharged by means of av plunger, not

shown. The bore 34 of the metal tip 30 terminates in a seat 35 which is preferably outwardly tapered to receive the frusto-conical portion 36 of the hub located at the end of the cannula 3.7 opposite its tissue piercing point 38 and shown as having its other extremity 39 rounded as may 'best'be seen in Figs. 7 and 11.

The needle anchoring clip, generally indicated at 40 may most conveniently include a pair .of arms .41 adapted to partly encircle the glass tip 29 to be-freely supported thereby and confined between the shoulders 31' and 32 and a digitally engageable tab part '42.. The clip ltlalso includes means engageable with a needle hub and these are also preferably in the form of a pair of fingers 43 spaced to receive between them the cannula 37 of the needle.

As will be apparent fromFigs. 7nd .8, when no needle is positioned in the seat 35 or when the clip 4% is inoperatively positioned with respect thereto, the clip 40 is loosely connected tothe syringe body with its'fingers 43 remote from the extremity of the metal tip 30 thus to enable a conventional American Luer needle 'hub to be fitted thereon. When, however, the clip 40 is positioned so that its fingers 43 engage the rounded exposed end 39 of the needle hub, considerable pressure is exerted axially towards the syringe body with its arms bound between said shoulders thus ensuring suflicient tightness to withstand the pressure of the liquid being forcibly ejected from the syringe body which acts directly on the needle hub. The ease of operation both in securing and releasing a needle, will be readily apparent.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that the invention is well adapted for use in connecting needles to syringe bodies to meet requirements both of use and production.

What I therefore claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a hypodermic or like syringe for use with a needle having a hub spaced from the tissue piercing point of its cannula, a body having an outwardly tapering seat in its distal end which is dimensioned to receive and partly expose the needle hub and Which. is incommunication with the interior of said body, and a resilient clip including a pair of fingers spaced apart to receive the cannula between them and to engage with said hub, .said clip being carried by said body for movement into and out of a position in which said fingers resiliently engage the exposed end of a needle hub positioned in said seat.

2. In a cartridge syringe for use with :a needle having a hub located between the pointed ends of its cannula, a body having an outwardly tapering seat in its distal end which is dimensioned to receive and partly expose the needle hub and which is in communication with the interior of said body, and a resilient clip including a pair of fingers spaced apart to receive the cannula between them and to engage with said hub, said clip being pivotally secured to said body for movement .into and out of a position in which said fingers resiliently engage the exposed end of a needle hub positioned in said seat.

3. In a hypodermic or like syringe for use with a needle having a hub spaced from the tissue piercing point of its cannula, a body having an outwardly tapering seat in its distal end which is dimensioned to receive and partly expose the needle hub and which is in communication with the interior of said body, and a resilient clip including a pair of fingers spaced apart to receive the cannula between them and to engage with said hub, and an intermediate bend establishing a digitally engageable shoulder, saidclip being carriedby said body for movement into and out of a position in which said fingers resiliently engagethe exposed end of a needle hub positioned in said seat.

4. In a hypodermic or like syringe for use with a needle having a hub spaced from the tissue piercing point of its cannula, va body having an outwardly tapering seat in its ,distal end which is dimensioned to receive and partly.

expose the needle hub and which is in communication with the interior of said body, and a resilient clip including a pair of fingers spaced apart to receive the cannula between them and to engage with said hub, and a digitally engageable part, said clip being carried by said body for movement into and out of a position in which said fingers resiliently engage the exposed end of a needle hub positioned in said seat.

5. In a hypodermic or like syringe for use with a needle having a hub at the end of its cannula opposite its tissue piercing point, a glass body including a barrel and a distal end in the form of a tip, said body having an outwardly tapering seat at said distal end in communication with the interior of said barrel, a metal tip on said distal end terminating short of the proximate end of said barrel, the proximate ends of the metal tip and glass barrel establishing a pair of shoulders between which a part of the distal end is exposed, saidmetal tip having a seat in communicationwith said bore and dimensioned to receive and partly expose the hub, and a resilient clip including a first part caught loosely about said distal end between said shoulders and a second part including a pair of fingers spaced apart to receive the cannula between them and to engage-With its hub, said first clip part being loosely confined between said shoulders and free to swing into and out of an operative position with respect to said seat except when said fingers resiliently engage a seated hub, said first part then being bound against said shoulders.

6. In a hypodermic or like syringe for use with a needle having a hub at the end of its cannula opposite its tissue piercing point, a body having an outwardly tapering seat at its distal end inv communication with the interior of said body and dimensioned to receive and partly expose said hub, and an annular groove rearwardly of said seat establishing a pair of shoulders, and a re silient clip including a first part caught loosely by said body in said groove and a second part including a pair of fingers spaced apart to receive the cannula between them and to engage with its hub, said first clip part being loosely confined between said shoulders and free to swing into and out of an operative position with respect to said seat except when said fingers resiliently engage a seated hub, said first part then being bound against said shoulders.

7. In a hypodermic or like syringe for use with a needle having a hub at the end of its cannula opposite its tissue piercing point, a body having an outwardly tapering seat at its distal end in communication with the interior of said body and dimensioned to receive and partly expose said hub, and an annular groove rearwardly of said seat, and a resilient clip including a first part caught loosely about said glass tip between said shoulders, a second part disposed as a digitally engageable operating tab, and a third part including a pair of fingers spaced apart to receive the cannula between them and to engage with its hub, said first clip part being loosely confined between said shoulders and free to swing into and out of an operative position with respect to saidseat except when said fingers resiliently engage a seated hub, said first part then being bound against said shoulders.

8. In a hypodermic or like syringe for use with a needle having a hub tapering inwardly away from the tissue piercing end, a body having an outwardly tapering seat at its distal end in communication with the interior of said body and dimensioned toreceive' said hub,,a nd a resilient clip including a part engageable with the larger end of said hub, said clip being connected to said body for movement into and out of a position in which-said clip .part engages said end of a seated hub and resiliently maintains it securely connected to said body.

(References on following page) References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Kispert Oct. 19, 1915 Hein May 1, 1928 Hein June 5, 1-934 Eisele 'Nov. 5, 1935 FOREIGN PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1157552 *May 17, 1915Oct 19, 1915Winchester Mfg CompanyHypodermic syringe.
US1668315 *Jun 21, 1926May 1, 1928Hein George NCoupling and locking device for syringes
US1961490 *Jan 20, 1931Jun 5, 1934Hein George NSyringe equipment
US2020111 *Jun 16, 1934Nov 5, 1935Logan EiseleDetachable locking means for hypodermic syringe needles
FR522175A * Title not available
GB117654A * Title not available
GB361594A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4490142 *Aug 22, 1983Dec 25, 1984Silvern Rubin DCarpule syringe with rapidly acting mechanism for controllably _positively retaining the hub of a hypodermic needle
US4581024 *Dec 10, 1984Apr 8, 1986Becton, Dickinson And CompanyNeedle assembly
US4822343 *Sep 21, 1987Apr 18, 1989Louise BeiserBlood collection device with ejectable tips
US5026355 *Jan 23, 1990Jun 25, 1991Becton Dickinson And CompanyNeedle and hub assembly with needle contacting member
US5201716 *Jun 22, 1992Apr 13, 1993Richard Lewis GBlood sample needle support and ejection mechanism
US5876379 *Jan 22, 1998Mar 2, 1999Alcon Laboratories, Inc.Syringe cannula holder
US5925032 *Feb 17, 1998Jul 20, 1999Alcon Laboratories, Inc.Syringe cannula holder
US6158862 *Dec 4, 1997Dec 12, 2000Alcon Laboratories, Inc.Method of reducing glare associated with multifocal ophthalmic lenses
US7601140Jun 25, 2004Oct 13, 2009Alcon, Inc.Syringe pressure applicator
US8226576 *Feb 25, 2004Jul 24, 2012Becton, Dickinson And CompanySafety blood collection holder
US8915890Jul 30, 2009Dec 23, 2014Becton, Dickinson And CompanyMedical device assembly
DE2262706A1 *Dec 21, 1972Aug 23, 1973Ims LtdArzneimittelinjektor
EP0430978A1 *Jul 19, 1989Jun 12, 1991Treesa A SpencerBlood collector cylinder with needle ejector.
WO1990011789A1 *Apr 10, 1990Oct 18, 1990Anthogyr SocSystem for securing a needle on a syringe
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/243, 285/319, 285/332
International ClassificationA61M5/32, A61M5/34
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2005/3206, A61M5/34
European ClassificationA61M5/34