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Publication numberUS2807290 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 24, 1957
Filing dateJul 19, 1955
Priority dateJul 19, 1955
Publication numberUS 2807290 A, US 2807290A, US-A-2807290, US2807290 A, US2807290A
InventorsThomas Hearn Robert
Original AssigneeWayne Pump Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil can draining rack
US 2807290 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

SePf- 24, 1957 R. T. HEARN 2,807,290

OIL CAN DRAINING RACK Filed July 19, 1 955 United States Patent O Wayne Pump Company, Salisbury, Mtl., a corporation of Maryland Application July 19, 1955, Serial No. k523,021 3 Claims. .(Cl..141375) This invention relates to a rack for draining a container of viscous liquid and more particularly to a rack for draining a lubricating oil can.

At gasoline service stations and garages, lubricating oil is sold in sealed cans which the attendant opens when the oil is poured into the crankcase of the customers automobile. Oil is a viscous liquid, so small quantities adhere to and remain within the interior of the can after the usual pouring operation.

In accordance with this invention, a rack is provided for draining an open container of viscous liquid. The rack is constructed in the form of `a cage. This cage provides means for removably holding an open container in an inverted position over a receptacle to drain the liquid from the container into the receptacle. When the container is completely drained, it may be replaced by another container to be drained.

An object of this invention is to provide a rack for completely draining a container of viscous liquid. Another object is to provide a structure for a rack of the afore-mentioned type that is simple and economical to manufacture.

Other objects and adv-antages will appear from the illustrative embodiment of the invention described below, reference being made to the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is a front view in elevation of one form of this invention; and

Fig. 2 is a side view in elevation of the structure shown in Fig. 1, with a retained container and receptacle shown in phantom outline.

In Figs. l and 2, a rack is shown for draining an opened can of viscous liquid such as lubricating oil into a receptacle. In Fig. 2, an open can of lubricating oil and a receptacle are shown in phantom outline to illustrate the function of the various structural members making up the rack.

Referring to Figs. l and 2, the rack is constructed in the form of a cage made of strip or rod material such as wire. The wire may be, for example, steel or brass.

The rack or cage includes a closed wire loop 12. This closed loop includes a horizontal bottom 14 and vertical sides 16 and 18. These vertical sides are bent at their upper ends in a rearwardly extending loop 20, which forms a back. This loop is formed of substantially circular configuration to conform to the cylindrical side of the oil can. The loop is bent in a plane at an angle slightly below horizontal to support the side of a can in a sloped position.

A rear rod 22 which also is made of steel wire, for example, has a lower horizontal portion 24 and an upper hooked portion 26. This rear rod 22 is made of 46 diameter steel wire, for example, while the loop 12 is made, for example, of Ms diameter steel wire. This rear rod 22 is vertically disposed and is joined at a point slightly below hook 26 to the midpoint of the back 20 at a common point 28. The end 30 of the lower portion 2 joined to the midpoint of the bottom 14.

of therod 22 is joints are made, for example, by welding `The various or brazing.

A Yhorizontal Vcrossbar 32, also a 1'/s" steel wire, for example, joins the sides 16 and 18 of the cage at a'point slightly above the vertical center of the cage. An upper portion 34 of rod 22 is bent abruptly forward and 'then sloped in lan upward and backward `direction to support the 'side 'of can 4'0 in `a sloped position. The portion 34 i'sb'ent forward to allow an appreciable backward slope *withoutV interfering with a structure upon which the rack may be hung.

A vsteadying member formed by a Ashort rod 36 is welded to the lower vertical portion of the rod 22 at a point slightly above the horizontal portion 24 of the rod 22. The short rod or steadying member 36 is oriented in a plane parallel to a plane including sides 16 and 18.

Referring to Fig. 2, an opened can 40 of a viscous liquid, such as lubricating oil, is retained in a sloped inverted position over another similar can 42. As shown in Fig. 2, both of these cans are removably retained. The receptacle, however, formed by can 42 may be permanently secured to the rack.

The sloped upper portion 34 of rod 22 cooperates with the looped back 20 to removably retain the open can 40 in a sloped inverted position over can 42. 'The crossbar 32 Supports the draining opened end of can 40 over the can 42 without interfering with the drip of oil flowing from the upper can 40 to the lower receptacle 42.

The bottom 14 and horizontal portion 24 of rod 22 cooperate with the sides 16 and 18 and the lower vertical portion of rod 22 to removably retain can 42 in position to collect the drippings from the upper can 40. As previously stated, can 42 may be permanently secured within rack 10 to provide a unitarily collecting structure. When can 42 is removably retained, however, any drained can of lubricating oil may be used for the collecting receptacle.

The hook member 26 provides a means for hanging the rack on any convenient supporting structure, such as the upper end of an oil drum (not shown). Since portion 34 starts sloping backward from a position forward of its base, it carries can 40 in backward sloping position without interfering with a supporting member (not shown) upon which rack 10 is hung. The steadying rod 36 rests against the supporting structure and prevents the rack from rocking to and fro when it is hung thereon.

Rack 10 is relatively simple in structure and has proven to be economical to fabricate and manufacture. A quantity of these racks may, therefore, be inexpensively provided at service stations to provide a means for reclaiming oil which would otherwise be thrown away with the partially emptied cans. These racks may also be used for draining containers of other viscous liquids, such as molasses.

What is claimed is:

1. A rack for draining an opened container of viscous liquid comprising a cage, said cage including sides, said sides being continued to form a back and a horizontal bottom, a rod extending centrally from said back to said bottom, said rod having a lower horizontal portion and having an upper sloped portion and a hooked portion for hanging said rack on a supporting structure, said rod being vertically disposed and having its upper portion joined to said back and its lower portion joined to said bottom, a crossbar joining said sides, said bottom and the lower portions of said rod cooperating with said sides to hold a receptacle for drained viscous liquid, said back and said sides cooperating with said crossbar and an upper portion of said rod to removably retain said container in an inverted position over said receptacle to drain said liquid from said container into said receptacle.

2. The invention comprising the combination set forth in claim 1 wherein said upper portion of said rod is sloped to maintain-said container in a sloped inverted position, and wherein a steadying member is joined to said lower portion of said rod in a plane substantially perpendicular to said lower horizontal portion of said rod to prevent said rack from rocking when it `is hung on said supporting structure.

3. A rack for draining an opened can of lubricating oil into another can comprising a cage, said cage including a rod formed into a closed loop to provide sides, a back and a bottom, said cage including a rear rod having a lower horizontal portion and having'an upper hooked portion for hanging said rack on a supporting structure, said rear rod being ,vertically disposed and having its upper portion joined to said back and its lower portion joined to said bottom at approximately their centers, a crossbar joining the midportion of said sides, said bottom and said lower portions of said rear rod cooperating with said sides to removably retain said other can, an upper portion of said rear rod being sloped for cooperating with said back to removably retain said opened can in a sloped inverted position over said other can, and said crossbar supporting the draining opened end of said opened can.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1763420 *Aug 26, 1929Jun 10, 1930Nat Biscuit CoDisplay rack and bin
US2508944 *Mar 5, 1947May 23, 1950Harney Patrick JCan opener
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3230986 *Aug 27, 1963Jan 25, 1966Worley Dean OBottle draining rack
US3865023 *Apr 18, 1973Feb 11, 1975Halvorsen Harold WKitchen appliance for skimming fat
US4399847 *Apr 8, 1982Aug 23, 1983Mcroberts William JApparatus for draining viscous fluids
US5425401 *Aug 5, 1993Jun 20, 1995Boggs; Delbert A.Container for used motor oil from oil filters
US6213352Aug 11, 1998Apr 10, 2001Homer W. Boyer, Jr.Foldable drum draining device
US7846330 *Mar 19, 2008Dec 7, 2010Nelson Keith AOil filter drain tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/375, 248/311.2, 141/364, 248/302
International ClassificationA47G23/02, F16N37/00, A47G23/00
Cooperative ClassificationF16N37/00, A47G23/0266
European ClassificationA47G23/02D, F16N37/00