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Publication numberUS2807904 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 1, 1957
Filing dateJan 15, 1951
Priority dateJan 15, 1951
Publication numberUS 2807904 A, US 2807904A, US-A-2807904, US2807904 A, US2807904A
InventorsKreske Walter J
Original AssigneeKreske Walter J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Folding bipod assembly
US 2807904 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 1, 1957 Filed Jan. 15, 1951 W. J. KRESKE FOLDING BIPOD ASSEMBLY 2 Sheets-Sheet l Oct. 1, 1957 V w. J. KRESKE 2,307,904

FOLDING BIPOD ASSEMBLY Filed Jan.l5, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 llll i L United p States Patent Ofiice Patented Oct. 1, 1957 2,s07,9a4 FoLnrNo error) ASSEMBLY Walter J. Kreske, Newton Centre, Mass. Application January 15, 1951, Serial No. 205,973 9 Claims. or. 42-94 This invention relates to supporting devices and more particularly to supporting devices which are selectable between an open support and folded-out-of-the-way positions.

In many instances, particularly in the field of military weapons, it becomes desirable to provide supporting means which can at will and with minimum manipulation be arranged in usable supporting position or alternately retracted to an out-of-the-way position as for storage. In such applications where time is of the essence it is very important that these movements of the supporting device to the supporting use and retracted out-of-tbe-way positions be very rapid. Likewise under the stress and strain of battle conditions it is a great advantage if the manipulations required for performing these movements are so simple that they may be performed virtually without thought and without fumbling.

Also it is desirable that such a device he rugged, yet light and compact, especially when in the retracted outof-the-Way position. The weapon becomes thereby more maneuverable, both over open country and in wooded terrain where underbrush catching on projecting elements normally becomes a problem.

In the instanceof weapons such as rifles where the support is placed near the muzzle of the gun, it is desirable that the support when in the support position be easily slidable over the ground. This is to facilitate proper positioning of the rifle with respect to the user and target without requiring physical lifting of the heavy weapon. At the same time, it is desirable that during aiming and firing of the gun, the support remain stationary with respect to the ground so that unevenness of the terrain may not upset the aim.

Pursuantto the present invention, the above desirable characteristics have been achieved in a bipod support particularly applicable for supporting rifles as during firing. The above are achieved generally by providing a housing adapted for attachment to the rifle or other item tobe supported, a rotatively mounted cross member in the housing, two legs pivotally mounted on the cross member to swing toward and away from each other, guides to swing the legs away from each other as they rotate with the cross member to the support position and to swing the legs toward each other as they rotate with the cross member to the folded out-of-the-way position, and manually releasable means for locking the legs and housing together in the support and folded positions respectively.

By providing guides in the form of cam formations on the housing for guiding the legs to the open and folded positions, individual leg manipulations with the inherent possibility of fumbling is eliminated. The legs are thereby made to operate in unison when either leg is moved, as with the hand, thus permitting the opening and folding operations to be performed as a single sweep movement of one hand as a simple and rapid operation.

By making the manually releasable locking means as a resilient operating catch, the bipod becomes thereby automatically self locking upon reaching the open support position or the folded out-of-the-way positions.

By making the catch as a spring pressed plunger retained by a U-shaped locking-member, operational and structural simplicity are achieved.

By providing resiliently held plungers for disengaging the catch, manual release of the support from either the folded or open support positions becomes little more than a simple push button operation, entailing virtually no thought or possibility of fumbling. It also insures a sealed housing at all times free from dirt or other foreign matter which might interfere with proper functioning.

By providing cone shaped feet on the legs, the advantages of individual telescoping leg adjustments by a novel rotative locking bushing arrangement are achieved together with a foot support that always rests tangent to the terrain. This insures maximum steady support as well as sliding contact for adjusting rifle position without having to lift its weight. a

By providing a resilient element for maintaining the lock bushing at all times against the outer tubular leg, locking and unlocking of the legs for telescoping action is accomplished with minimum rotational displacement of the leg members about the leg axis.

These and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become more apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings depicting one embodiment of the invention wherein:

Fig. 1 is a gun with the support or bipod at the muzzle end.

Fig.2 is a side elevation in larger scale of the forward end of the gun with the support or bipod in the retracted or folded out-of-the-way position.

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal section at a scale of the forward end of the gun and cut away upper portion of the associated bipod housing.

Fig. 4 is a section on line 4 4 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a side elevation of the yoke member shown at the bottom of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is an elevation of the yoke member shown in Fig. 5 taken in the direction of arrow 6 in Fig. 5.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged end view of a leg lock bushing used in the bipod mount and taken in the direction of arrow 7 in Fig. 8. i

Fig. 8 is a cross sectional view ing taken on line 88 of Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 is a view of a bipod mount locked in the open support position and shown partially cut away and in partial cross section to more clearly illustrate construction.

Fig. 10 is a side elevation of the upper portion of the bipod mount shown in Fig. 9 and taken in the direction of arrow 10 in Fig. 9. i

Fig. 11 is an end view of the saddle housing for the cross member or leg mounting assembly.

Fig. 12 is a side elevation of the saddle housing in Fig. 11. i

Fig. 13 is an elevation of the camming and locking member in the housing assembly as seen from the stock end of the gun. i

Fig. 14 is a side view of the member shown in Fig. 13 taken in the direction of arrow 14 in Fig. 13.

Fig. 15 is a front elevation of the member shown in Figs. 13, 14, and 16 and taken in the direction of arrow 15 in Fig. 14.

Fig. 16 is a bottom view of the member shown in Figs. l3, l4, and 15 andtaken in the direction of arrow 16 in Fig. 14.

Referring to the drawings in more detail, a bipod mount made in accordance with the invention and illustrating one embodiment thereof is designated generally further enlarged of the leg lock bushby the humeralZl J and'is hown in Fig. 1 in the open or support position attached to the rrluz zle of a designated generally by the numeral 22. While the gun shown at 22 is a military rifle commonly known as the Browning automatic rifle, it should be'under'st'ood that the inventionir'na'y be used for other weapons as machine guns,.the Garand rifle, i'ecoilless rifles, .bazoo'kas and also for other devices as benches, telescopes and the like.

. In the open support position shown in Fig. 1, support of theground, a floor or any terrain 24 may be obtained by resting the feet 26 of the bipod mount 20 thereon. The feet 26' (Figs. 1, 2, 9) are made preferably with a circularconeshaped exterior with a cylindrical rim 28 at the peripheral base of the cone and generous radii 30 and 32 (Figs. 2 9) at the intersection of the cone base and rim 28 and at the vertex of the cone respectively. The angle formed by the axis and element of the cone of a foot 26 is apptoxima't'ely the complement of one half the angle formed by the legs of the bipod mount when in the open support position. Thus the cone of each foot able support is important in that when the gun is first being set for proper firing position to suit the individuality of the user, it is generally preferred and more convenient to locate this position by sliding the gun about upon the feet 26 rather than by lifting the entire weight of the gun. Under some conditions the latter is not only impracticable but nearly impossible. For example, where the gun 22 is a military weapon known as the Browning automatic rifle, while portable, its weight is such that it would be extremely inconvenient if not impossible to lift for positioning under general use conditions. This is due to the-above positioning being generally done when the individual is lying on the ground ready'to fire, or in a trench where he has easy access only to'the tailstock 34(Fig. l) of the gun 22. v

A further advantage of the cone and rim 28 construction in the feet will be hereinafter described in connection with the telescopic adjustment of length of the legs of the bipod mount 20. V V a Each of the feet 26 for rapidity and ease of manufacture is preferably made of two elements, a pad 36 (Fig. 9)

. 4 44 and in axial alignment manner 50 (Fig. 9) having a cylindrical connector portion 52 fitted in an axial hole at the other end of the extensible member 44 and fixed in'place as by a transverse pin 54. a V

' Extending axially of the extensible member 44, the male locking member 50 has a cylindrical reduced neck portion 56, an outwardly flaring circular cone shaped portion 58 and terminates in a threaded end portion 60, all in axial alignment with the extensible member 44.

A lock bushing 62;(Fig's. 7, 8, 9) split axially into preferably three approximately equal sections has a female threaded portion 64 engaging the threaded end section 60 and a female cone shaped portion 66 engaging the cone portion 58 of the'male locking member 50. When the male locking member 50 is rotated in one directionwith respect to the bushing 62, the female cone portion 66 is made to ride up on the male cone portion 58 due to the threadlead of the threaded portions 60 and 64 and there by causes the bushing 62 to expand against the inside wall of the hollow cylindrical member 68 forming the upper portion of the leg 46. .This expansion of the bushing 62 against the inside. wall of the hollow cylindrical member 68 causes a secure locking in place of the extensible member I By rotating the male locking member 50 in the opposite direction the cone portions 58 and 66 move axially in opposite relation causing relieving of the pressure of bushing 62 against the inside wall of the hollow cylinf drical member 68, thereby permitting axial movement and adjustment of the extensible member 44 with respect to the hollow cylindrical member 68 in a telescoping action. 7

and a cylindrical connector 38 having a neck 40 with I reduced diameter locatedin a hole to receive same at the vertex of the cone of the foot 26. The pad 36 and connector 38 may be secured together by a weld fillet 42 or 'brazing or any other suitable manner, or if desired 7 minimum of rotation 'of the foot 26. It has been found theentire foot 26 may be fashioned from a single 'piece of material. a The pad 36 is preferablyof a hard metallic material such as steel or aluminum alloy. A low carbon steel stamping with-a thin case hardening treatment is preferable due to its resistance to hard usage and abrasion. Where lightness of weight is of the essence, an aluminum alloy would be preferable. V

The connector 38 is closely fitted in a hole at the lower end ofja cylindrical extensible member 44 of the leg 46 and fastened as byqatransverse pin 48 or by brazing or other suitable means. The pin 48 fastening is suitable where a steel pad'36 and connector 38 are used with an aluminum alloy extensible member 44. Where the same materials are used in both pad 36 and extensible member 44,- or where:the' materials used are suitable, the connector 38 may be dispensed with and the extensible member 44 brazed, welded or otherwise fastened directly to the pad 36. The extensible member 44 is preferably of an aluminum alloy commercially known as 24ST4 or 75SYF6 insuring: extreme li'ghtness, yet having sufficient strength to' withstand severe use conditions. At the other end ofthe 'cylindric'al extensible member Locking and unlQCking actiOn may be performed by the simpleoperation of grasping with the hand the rim 28 of the foot 26 and rotating it in the proper direction. To facilitate selecting the direction of rotation for the desired result, the word Unlock or other suitable inscription with directional arrow is provided at 70 on the a hollow cylindrical member 68 .in a position easily visible, preferably to an individual located near the tailstock 34 of the gun 22. The inscription could also be made along the 28 of the foot 26, but the former position is preferred as not .being subject to obliteration by contact with the terrain 24. 1 a 7 Pursuant to the present invention it has been found that the use of a sectioned bushing 62 alone tends toward sluggish and erratic operation in the amount of rotation of the foot 26 required for the release and locking actions. For rapidity and simplicity of adjustment, it is desired to perform the locking and unlocking operation with a that by using a small resilient member as a circular spring element 70 positioned to exert an outward radial force at the approximate middle of the lock bushing 62 consistent, rapid releasing and locking action is obtained with g a minimum rotation of the foot 26. Itis believed that the reason for this is that any looseness or play between the inside wall of the hollow cylindrical member 68 and the outside surface of the bushing 62 is eliminated and a minimum amount of friction between the two surfaces maintained at all times. ficientto effect at all times a turning moment on the bushing which cannot be exceeded by that due to the friction between the threaded portions 60 and 64. In this manner; rotational slippage between the bushing 62 and the hollow cylindrical member is eliminated, thereby minimizing'lthe rotational displacement required at the foot 26'. Releasing and locking action in approximately one third revoluti'onof the foot 26, which may be performed in a single twist of the hand without releasing the grip on the rim28, has been obtained by the use of 24 threads per inch at the threaded portions 60 and 64. This number of threads per inch has also been found to produce a secure locking of the members for use conditions.

therewith is a male r This minimum friction is suf-' While the use of approximately this number of threads per inch is preferred, it should be understood other thread rates may also be used with good results.

When the male locking member 50 is rotated with respect to the bushing 62 in the releasing direction until the base of the lock bushing 62 impinges against the flange 74 (Fig. 9) between the connector 52 and the neck portion 56 of the male lock member 50, jamming against the flange 74 occurs so as to cause slipping of the bushing 62 with respect to the inside wall of the hollow cylindrical member 68. It has been found that by relieving the base of the bushing 62 so that only a small ring or projection 76 at the inner diameter of the base makes contact with the flange 74, slippage from the above cause is prevented and malfunction of the locking mechanism eliminated.

The flange 74 is made slightly larger in diameter than that of the extensible member 44 and is slidably fitted inside the hollow cylindrical member 68 which has at its lower end an inwardly projecting flange 78 (Fig. 9) slidably fitted about the periphery of the extensible member 44. Telescoping or axial adjustment of the extensible member 44 is limited by the flange 74 against the flange 78, thereby providing an extremely simple and inexpensive stop means for preventing inadvertent separation of the members, as during adjustment. Also this arrangement provides the advantage of permitting telescoping adjustment of the legs 46 even if the members 44 and 68 are slightly bent. The reason for this is that the relatively short contact distances, namely at the periphs ery of the flanges 74 and 78 occur between the hollow cylindrical member 68 and the extensible member 44 and a liberal clearance exists between these members at all other points.

To facilitate the amount and equality of adjustment of both legs, lines 79 are provided about the periphery of the extensible members 44 at such equal intervals as for example one inch. The line 79 may consist of a groove about the periphery and filled with an easily visible coloring material. 3

The upper end of the hollow cylindrical member 68 of the leg 46 is fitted over a cylindrical connector portion 80 (Figs. 5, 6, 9) at the base of a yoke end piece 82 and fixed in place by a transverse pin 84 or by any other suitable means. The body portion of the yoke end-piece 82 has an opening 86 extending therethrough adapted to receive a trunnion or stud 88 to which the yoke endpiece 82 is mounted by a pivot pin 90 to pivot in a plane defined by the axes of the stud 88 and leg 46. The pivot pin 90 is substantially at right angles to the axes of the stud 88 and leg 46 and is held in place by a head 92 (Fig. at one end fitting preferably flush with the side wall of the end piece 82 and a spring washer 94 in a groove at the other end of the pivot pin 90. This mounting construction is used here because of its inexpensiveness and extreme simplicity in manufacture and use, however other suitable pivoting constructions as screws may also be used.

The opening 86 in the yoke end piece 82 is preferably so dimensioned that its top and bottom surfaces 96 and 98 (Fig. 9) make contact with the corresponding top and bottom surfaces of the stud 88 when the leg 46 has pivoted or swung outwardly the proper amount for the open support position as shown in Fig. 9. The outward pivoting movement of the legs 46 for the open support position of the bipod mount shown in Fig. 9 is insured bycam formations 99 located on the opposed sides of the bottom or U portion of the bend in a U-shaped camming and locking member 100.

The bottom cam formations 99, more clearly seen in Fig. 16, are formed as part of a circular cone generated by the legs 46 when in the open support position shown in Fig. 9. An opening or hole 102 is located in the U portion of the camming and locking member 100 concentrically of the cam surfaces 99 and having an axis substantially aligned with the axis of the abovementioned cone.

In the open support position of the bipod mount as shown in Fig. 9, the location of the hole 102 is such that it receives the reduced end 104 (Figs. 4, 9) of a plunger 106 which is forced into position and held in place against a shoulder 108 by a compression coil spring 110 housed in a hollow portion of the plunger 106 for that purpose. The free end of the spring 110 is compressed against the base of a blind hole 114 (Fig. 9) located centrally of and perpendicular to the axis of a transverse bearing element 112 (Fig. 9), which terminates on either end in the axially aligned studs 88. The hole 114 houses a sleeve 116 which guides and gives lateral support to the plunger 106 which is slidably disposed therein. The sleeve 116 is held in place by set screws 118 running axially at either side of the transverse bearing member 112.

A spacer sleeve or separator 120 (Figs. 4, 9) fitting over the center portion of the bearing element 112 separates two ball joint elements 122 (Figs. 4, 9) mounted on the ends of the bearing member 112. The ball joint elements 122 have spherical surfaces 124 which fit corresponding spherical surfaced axially aligned holes 125 (Figs. 11, 12) in the opposed sides of the housing member 126. Thereby universal joint action is provided for the transverse bearing member 112 with its studs 88 and attached legs 46. When the plunger is in place in the hole 102 in the U-shaped member 100 the movement of the housing formed by the U-shaped camming and locking member 100 and housing member 126 with respect to the legs 46 is a swivel action about the axis of the plunger 106.

This swivel action is very valuable in that it permits smooth traverse or azimuth variations of the gun over a substantial angle during the open or support position of the bipod mount. During such traverse, the feet 26 of the bipod mount 20 remain stationary on the terrain 24, thereby effectively preventing aiming inaccuracies due to unevenness in the terrain.

The U-shaped camming and locking member 100 has also a second hole 128 (Figs. 3, 4, 13, 14) similar to the hole 102 and also adapted to receive the reduced end 104 of the locking plunger 106. The axis of the hole 128 is placed at a suitable angle with respect to the axis of the hole 182 and is directed to be perpendicular to and intersecting the axis of the transverse bearing element 112 at the point of intersection of the plunger 106 axis. In the present instance the axis of hole 128 is positioned at an angle slightly more than 90 degrees with the axis of hole 102. Thus when the end 104 of the plunger 106 falls in the hole 128, the legs 46 are pointing slightly upward along the barrel 130 of the gun 22 as shown in Fig. 2. The position there shown is the foldedoutofthe-way position for the bipod mount 20. The angular position of the legs 46 in Fig. 2 while preferred for the gun there shown need not be the same in every instance and may be varied to suit the particular Weapon by suitable location of the hole 128 in the camming and locking member 100.

Cam surfaces 132 on the opposite sides of one leg of the camming and locking member 100 (Figs. 4, 15, 16) and cam surfaces 134 (Figs. 4, 13, 16) on the opposite sides of the other leg of the U-shaped camming and locking member 100 are proportioned to just meet the beveled ends 136 (Figs. 4, 5) and the base ends 138 respectively of the yoke end pieces 82. This together with the pivot pins 90 and plunger 106 in the locking hole 128 eflects a securely locked, immovable, folded out-ofthe way position for the bipod mount 20. This is a compact useful position for the bipod mount 20 when the gun 22 is to be stored or carried, especially over rough and wooded terrain where branches and undergrowth tend to catch on projecting elements.

It should be noted in Fig. 4 that the legs 46 in the assays;

the folded position, as explained above, are reached by the bevel ends 136 of the yoke pieces 82'by. guidance over the inclined 'car'n surfaces 142' (Fig. 15). Also to assist in this guiding action, a beveled cam surface 144 (Fig. 6) is provided on the side of each yoke piece 82 nearest the corresponding cam formation 142. The angle of inclinati'on er thecam surfaces 142 and 144 are such that i .as the legs pivot with the transverse bearing element 112 in the housing member 126 from the open position shown in Figs. 1, 9, 10 to the folded out-of-the-way position I shown in Figs. 2, 3, 4, positive inward folding action of the legs will occur in smooth gradual stages until locking in the folded position, as explained above, occurs. The

earn formations 142 and 144 cause snchfolding action as either leg is moved backward toward the tailsto'ck from 'the open support position. Thus, once the plunger is retracted from the locking hole 102 of the open support position, pivoting the bipod to the folded dut-df-th-way position becomes a simple one hand operation of swinging either leg 46 backward toward the tailstoek of the gun. Such movement causes both legs to move backward and inwardly in unison to the folded position where the plunger will automatically seek out the locking hole 128 and lock the bipod mount in this position until manually released. To further assist in this smoothness of operation, the beveled edge 136 of each yoke piece 82 is provided with a cone shaped face with the vertex of the cone approximately at the point 145 on the centerline of the opening 86 ('Fig';

It has been found that by providing buttons 146 and 148 (Figs. 3 4, 9) for the locking holes 102 and 128 respectively, manual retraction of the plunger 106 is greatly facilitated. The buttons of plungers 146 and 148 may be held in place by riveting or otherwise attaching to the ends of'a flat or leaf spring 150 (Figs. 3, having the contour of the'adjace'nt portion of the U-shaped carnining and locking member .100 to which it may be fastened as byscrews152 (Figs; 3, 10), rivets or other suitable means. Thusthe operation of moving the bipod mount 20 from: the open support position shown in Fig. l to the folded position shown in Fig. 2 consists of pressing the button 146 as with the finger and swinging either leg 46 backward 'until the plunger 106 falls into position in the hole 128 to lock the bipod, 20 in the folded position as shown in Fig; 2.

Moving the bipod 20 to the open support position of a .1 from the folded position of Fig. 2 is accomplished byfthe simple expedient of pressing the button 148 as with the finger and'swinging either leg downward until the plunger fallsinto the hole 102 to lock the bipod in the open support position. By tilting the barrel130 of the gun 22 slightly downward when the button 148 is pressed, the force of gravity alone will swing the legs 46 down ward untilthe bipod 20 is locked in the open support position. This opening operation from the folded position is extremely simple and rapid, being a matter of split seconds. I he 7 V 'Another important function of the buttons 146 and 148 and the leaf spring 150 is that of closing the holes 102 and 123 respectively when not closed by the plunger 106. In this manner dirt; sand and other foreign matter encountered during use ofthe weapon is prevented from entering the mechanism to in any way'impair its operation.

Thehousing member 126 has a cylindrical collar portion 154, side lugs 156'and end lugs (Figs. 11], 12'). The U-shaped member 100 has side openings 1 60 and 6nd openings '162"(Fig s. 13, 14, 15,16) adapted toreceive the corresponding side lugs 1'56 and end lugs 158 respectively of the housing meinber'126. jBy pushing theh'ous ing member126 i'n the relation shown in- Fig. 12 into the U-shaped member 100;in the relation shown in Fig.- 14

until the lugs 156 seat in the holes 160, a strong unitary,

rigid housing is thereby eifecte'd. Such rigid and strong construction is further insured by clamping the two legs oflthe U shaped member 100 tightly against the sides of the housing 126 as by a bolt and nut arrangement 164 (Fig. 10) passed through the holes 1 66 for that purpose in the legs of the U-sh'aped 'inember 100 (-Figs. 13, '15). The'stem of the bolt 164 may-also have a suitable lug thereontnot shown) to provide a stop for the plunger 106 to preventitfrom piv'otally overshooting the locking a In this assembled condition, circular hanger hole 128. openings 168 (Figs. 13, 15) atthe upper ends of the legs of the U-shaped member 100 are axially aligned with the cylindricaleollar portion 154 of the housing member 126.

An arrangement is thereby provided for attaching the bipod rnount 20 to a un; In the present instance the bipod is attached to the muzzle of the gun 22 by a hollow cylindrical sleeve adapter 170 (Figs; 1, 2, 3) which also functions as a flash hide'r. The adapter 170 has an internally threaded end 172 screwed onto the threaded front end of'the barrel 130. The bipod h'o'iising is hung from this adaptor between a shoulder 174 (Fig. 3) formed by a raised collar portion 176 and a thrust collar 178 and spring washer 180 fixed against a shoulder 182 on the barrel 7 o pri n of the gun 22. The c0llar-176has flats formed thereon adapted for use of a wrench in screwing the adapter in place; The spring washer while' taking up end play has sufiicie'nt resilience to permit axial rotation of the gun barrel 130 in the collar 126 as for adjusting the stock 34 of the gun 22 to the shoulder of individual using 7 the weapon.

The above described'construction of the bipod housingachieves a compact easily assembled arrangement which effectively seals in the working elements as plunger and swivel and preventing dirt or other for'eign matter from having access thereto. It alsolends itself "to the-very rapidan'clinexpensive manufacturing stamping opera: tions from sheet material rather than expensive and time consuming milling operations. It'is rnade preferably of such strong metals as steel or aluminum alloys. By the use of such'alun iinum alloys commercially known a's'24ST4 or 75ST6 advantages of strength and extreme;

lightness of construction are achieved.

The bipod herein described; besides weighing only a fractio'n'of that currently used on the Browning automatic rifle, has fewer components, and the shape of its com-- What I elaimis:

V 1n combina' 'on with a hand portable weapon of the type having an elongated body requiring directional pos tion ing for directing projectiles, a folding bipod mount bearing member universally pivoted in said housing,

weapon-supporting legs respectively pivoted to' oppositely pwi fl nsw w. of th ar n m m e n and closing movement relatively. to each other and trans versely tothe axis of the weapon, said bearing member adapting the legs for swinging in unison l'o rigitudinally of the weapon between substantial alignment therewith and; approximate perpendicularity thereto and providing also for angular traverse of the weapon andhousing on and relative to' the legs; and a singlespring actuated manually releasable means at said housing automatically to lock 1 housing fixed to said weapon, a transverse Q the legs selectably in said aligned and perpendicular positions.

2. In combination with a hand portable weapon of the type having an elongated body requiring directional positioning for directing a projectile, a folding bipod mount comprising a housing fixed to said weapon, a transverse bearing member rotatively mounted in said housing, weapon-supporting legs respectively pivoted to oppositely projecting portions of the bearing member for opening and closing movement relatively to each other and transversely to the axis of the weapon, said bearing member adapting the legs for swinging in unison longitudinally of the weapon substantial alignment therewith and approximate perpendicularity thereto, a flared smooth bottomed, pad-like foot rigidly fixed to the end of each of said legs, said feet providing sliding contact for said bipod in the perpendicular position, and manually releasable anchoring means in said housing to lock the legs selectably in said aligned and perpendicular positions.

3. A folding bipod assembly for guns of the class described rand comprising a mounting saddle including a barrel collar and an offset housing body, a cross shaft having an intermediate universal type bearing and oppositely projecting ends, a socket for said bearing in said housing body, a pair of legs having yoke-like end couplings pivotally mounted to the respective ends of said shaft and in transverse relation to the axis of said shaft, a springpressed locking element and cooperative receiving elements, one of said types of elements on said shaft and the other of said types of elements on said housing body, said elements being interengageable to lock said shaft and legs at given angles relative to the axis of said barrel collar, one of said receiving elements positioned to lock said shaft and legs in an open support position, and another of said receiving elements positioned to lock said shaft and legs in a generally folded position along said barrel.

4. A folding bipod assembly for devices of the class described and comprising, in combination, a saddle having a supporting device fitting and cam formations, a cross shaft rotatively mounted in said saddle, a supporting leg pivoted at each end on said shaft on parallel axes transverse to the axes of said cross shaft and legs and in cooperative relation with said cam formations, and spring actuated manually releasable means for interengaging said cross shaft and saddle and cooperating with said cam formations to selectably automatically lock said legs in,

an open support position and a tion.

5. A bipod mount for guns of the class described, com prising in combination, a supporting body having a tubular collar adapted for coaxial attachment to a gun barrel to present the body in pendent relation thereto, a transverse bearing element having coaxial opposed trunnion-like studs, said element journaled in the body for turning about the stud axis, a supporting leg pivotally connected to each stud on parallel axes perpendicular to the stud axis, said legs pivotally movable in unison about the stud axis between an open position substantially perpendicular to the axis of the attaching collar and a folded position approximately paralleling said collar axis, lateral means on the supporting body cooper-able with the respective legs for relatively spreading them about their pivotal connections to the studs on movement of the legs into supporting position and bringing the respective legs toward each other about their pivotal connections to the studs on movement of the legs into the folded position, and automatically engageable manually releasable means for locking the legs in said supporting and said folded positions.

6. A bipod mount for guns of the class described, comprising in combination, a supporting body having a tubular collar adapted for coaxial attachment to a gun barrel to present the body in pendent relation thereto, a

closed retracted positransverse bearing element having coaxial opposed trunnion-like studs, said element journalled in the body for turning about the stud axis, a supporting leg pivotally connected to each stud on parallel axes perpendicular to the stud axis, and automatically engageable manually releasable means for locking the legs in said supporting and said folded positions, said means comprising a spring pressed plunger radially housed in said transverse bearing element and a plunger retainer having a guide surface therefor concentric with said bearing element and locking formations to receive the out-thrust plunger on arrival of the legs in said open supporting and said folded positions.

7. A bipod mount for a device of the class described, I

comprising in combination, a supporting body having an adapter formation for attachment to said device to present the body in pendent relation thereto, a transverse bearing element having coaxial opposed trunnion-like studs, said element journalled in the body for turning about the stud axis, a supporting leg pivotally connected to each stud on parallel axes perpendicular to the stud axis, and automatically engageable manually releasable means for locking the legs in said supporting and said folded positions, said locking means comprising a spring pressed plunger radially housed in said transverse bearing element and a plunger retainer having a guide surface therefor concentric with said bearing element and locking formations to receive the out-thrust plunger on arrival of the legs in said open supporting and said folded positions, and a spring pressed plunger at each of said positions for man ually releasing said locking means.

8. A collapsible support of the type described having selectable support and collapsed positions and comprising a housing, a rotatively mounted cross member in said housing, two legs pivotally mounted on said cross member to swing toward each other to approximate parallelism and away from each other to form a substantial support angle, cams on said housing disposed to swing said legs away from each other to said support angle upon rotation of said cross member to the support position and toward each other by a predetermined amount upon rotation of said cross member to the collapsed position, and manually releasable means cooperating with said cams for locking said legs in one and the other positions respectively.

9. A housing for a bipod of the type having a transverse bearing element with each of its ends having a leg pivotally mounted thereon, comprising two substantially U-shaped members, each of said members having two substantially parallel broad fiat legs joined at one end by a cylindrical shaped portion of each of said members, the cylindrical portion of said of said members being adapted to receive axially thereof an adapter for mounting said bipod, the legs of said one member having openings for said bearing element located therein on an axis transverse to the axis of said cylindrical portion, projections on the sides and ends of the legs of said one member, openings in the legs and cylindrical portion of the other of said U- shaped members adapted to receive said projections, thereby securely locking said members together with the axis of said cylindrical portions perpendicular to each other, and cam formations at the sides of said legs and cylindrical portion of said other U-shaped member for swinging said bipod legs in an open and folded positions.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,524,973 Hazelton Feb. 3, 1925 1,909,136 Thomas May 16, 1933 2,240,716 Pleister et al. May 6, 1941 2,436,349 Adams Feb. 17, 1948 2,470,924 Flogaus May 24, 1949 2,483,396 Benson Oct. 4, 1949 2,496,264 Benson Dec. 7, 1950

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Classifications
U.S. Classification42/94
International ClassificationF41A23/08, F41A23/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A23/08
European ClassificationF41A23/08