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Publication numberUS2808050 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 1, 1957
Filing dateJul 27, 1954
Priority dateJul 27, 1954
Publication numberUS 2808050 A, US 2808050A, US-A-2808050, US2808050 A, US2808050A
InventorsWard Thomas C
Original AssigneeWard Thomas C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical brace
US 2808050 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

T. C. WARD SURGICAL BRACE Oct. 1, 1957 Filed July 27, 1954 Thomas C.Ward

IN V EN TOR.

i d States Patent fltice 2,808,050 Patented Octal, 1957 SURGICAL BRACE Thomas C. Ward, Waco, Tex. Application July 27, 1954, Serial No. 446,123

Claims. (Cl. 128-18 vertebral bodies from the middorsal through the last lumbar segment, without the inconveniences encountered in the use of plaster casts. The brace is particularly adapted to provide a greater degree of comfort to the wearer than previously developed devices of this general nature by the provision of the simplest and lightest kind of framework which carries various support pads thereon in such a manner that the pads readily adapt themselves to the portions of the users body against which they are engaged, this being accomplished, more specifically, by a movable connection of the pads to the frame.

Figure l is a perspective View of the improved brace;

Figure 2 is a side elevational view of the brace as applied to the body of a wearer;

Figure 3 is an enlarged perspective view of the lumbar support pads; and

Figure 4 is an elevational view showing a modification in the brace construction.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, the reference numeral 10 indicates the main portion of the brace framework which takes the form of a substantially rigid, vertical stay member which carries a sternal support pad assembly 12 at its upper end and the pubic support pad assembly 14 at its lower end. These assemblies embody relatively rigid backing plate members 16 and 18, respectively, which are secured by means of the respective hinges 20 and 22 to the opposite ends of the stay such that they are connected thereto about horizontal or transverse pivot axes. The body contacting portion of each respective pad is provided with a layer of resilient material 24 or 26. The body contacting portions 24 and 26 are preferably formed of felt, sponge rubber or other similar soft material, and it is to be appreciated that these portions are to be made sufliciently thick as to prevent discomfort to the wearer.

Somewhat below the midportion of the stay 10 is attached a semi-circular resilient band member 28 such that its opposite end portions trail behind and stay in waist encircling relation thereto, and the opposite ends of this band carry the right and left torso side supports pads 30 and 32, respectively. Each of the torso side support pads embodies a metallic backing plate 34 rovided with a resilient, body engaging pad or layer 36 similar to the pre viously mentioned sternal and pubic support pads. The lower ends of the backing plates 34 are rigidly connected to the free ends of the band 28 and these pads, being vertically arranged, extend upwardly from the band in the manner shown. Attached to the stay 10 above the band 28 at substantially the height of the upper ends of the pads 30 and 32 is a strap anchoring member 38 by means of which metal loops 40 and 42 of a pair of flexible strap members 44 and 46 are secured to the stay. The upper end of each of the pads 30 and 32 is provided with a further anchoring member 48 by means of which the opposite ends of the straps 44 and 46 are attached thereto. A further flexible strap 50 is secured to the upper end of one of the pads and extends therefrom for connection with a buckle 52 secured to the upper end of the other pad.

The free ends of the band 28 carry a flexible strap member 54 and a buckle 56, respectively, by means of which the lumbar support pad assembly 58 is attached to the band. l

A metallic anchor strap 60 is secured to the free end of the strap 54 and carries at its opposite end a flexible strap 62 for cooperation with the buckle 56, as will be read ily apparent. A pair of lumbar pads 64 and 66 are secured to the metallic strap 60 and each will be seen to consist of an elongated, vertically disposed backing strip 68 having aprotective body engaging pad 70 secured thereto and it is to be noted that each backing strip is slightly arcuated and is secured at substantially its midpoint to the strap 60 for a purpose which will become presently apparent.

' In use, as shown most clearly in Figure 2, the sternal and pubic support pads are engaged against the proper portions of the users body and the strap 62 is engaged with the buckle 56 to secure the device and obtain the proper amount of hyperextension. Thereafter, the strap;

50 is engaged with the buckle 52 to complete the proper positioning of the torso side support pads 30 and 32. A further flexible strap 72 is secured at one end to the anchor member 74 at the lower end of the stay 10, andits free end is engaged with the buckle 76 to complete the securement of the brace assembly.

The stay 10 is, of course, of relatively rigid metallic construction, and it is to be noted that the provision of the hinge means 20 and 22 for connection thereto of the sternal and pubic support pads 12 and 14 permits these pads to flatly engage against the portions of the wearers body with which they come into contact Without digging or gouging thereagainst and without the necessity of bending the stay 10 to shape for permitting their flat contact engagement. Ftu'thermore, it will be seen that the band 28, being relatively flexible to twisting motion, in effect movably carries the torso side support pads 30 and 32 to permit their proper alignment with the wearers body once the strap 50 is secured. The pads 64 and 66 are, of course, arranged on opposite sides of the wearers spine, and due to their connection with the remainder of the brace by means of the straps 54 and 62, are rigidly but flexibly connected therewith such as to afford the maximum of comfort to the wearer. In fact, all the pad assemblies of the brace are movably connected with respect to the rigid brace frame and with respect to each other to properly engage the wearers body with a minimum of discomfort.

Referring now more particularly to Figure 4, the modification therein shown will be seen to consist of a sliding joint connection in the upper end of the main portion of the brace framework. The main portion is indicated by the reference numeral '78 and an extension therefor, 88, carries the pad 82 which is identical in all respects to the previously described pad 12 and corresponds thereto. The connection between the brace portion 78 and the extension 80 is effected by means of a rectangular sleeve or collar 84 which embraces both of these members and, is rigidly secured to one, such :as the extension, by rivets.

It is, of course, appreciated that the brace portion 78. and the extension 80 are thus slidably interconnected...

such thatthe vertical height of pad 82 may be varied to properly fit the user.

From the foregoing, the construction and operation of the device will be readily understood and further explanation is believed to be unnecessary.

' What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A surgical brace comprising a vertical stay member, sternal and pubic support pads secured to the upper and lower ends respectively of said stay, a resilient, semicircular band secured to said stay between said sternal and pubic 'supportpads, right and left torso side support pads secured to the opposite ends of said band, a lumbar support pad, and flexible strap means secured to the opposite ends of said band and carrying said lumbar pad.

A surgical bracecomprising a vertical stay member, sternal and pubic support pads, means securing said sternal support paid about a transverse pivot to the upper end of said stay, means securing said pubic support pad about a transverse pivot to thelower end of said stay, a'resilient, semi-circular band secured to said stay between said sternal and pubic support pads, right and left torso side support pads secured to the oppositeends of said band, a lumbar support pad, and flexible strap means secured to the opposite ends of said band and carrying said lumbar pad.

3. A surgical brace comprising a vertical stay member, sternal and pubic support pads, means securing said sternal support pad about a transverse pivot to the upper end of said stay, means securing said pubic support pad about a transverse pivot to the lower end of said stay, a resilient, semi-circular band secured to said stay between said sternal and pubic support pads, right and left torso side support pads secured to the opposite ends of said band, a lumbar support pad, and flexible strap means secured to the opposite ends of said band and carrying said lumbar pad, said right and left torso side support pads being ver tically elongated and secured at their lower ends to said band, and a flexible strap buckle-connected to form a loop and secured to the upper ends of said right and left torso side support pads.

4 A surgical brace comprising a vertical stay member, sternal and pubic support pads, means securing said sternal support pad about a transverse pivot to the upper end of said stay, means securing said pubic support pad about a transverse pivot to the lower end of said stay, a resilient, semi-circular band secured to said stay between said sternal and pubic support pads, right and left torso side support pads secured to the opposite ends of said band, a lumbar support pad, and flexible strap means secured to the opposite ends of said band and carrying said lumbar pad, said lumbar pad being vertically elongated and secured at its midpoint to said flexible strap means.

5. A surgical brace comprising a vertical stay member, sternal and pubic support pads, means securing said sternal support pad about a transverse pivot to the upper end of said stay, means securing said pubic support pad about a transverse pivot to the lower end of said stay, a resilient, semi-circular band secured to said stay between said sternal and pubic support pads, right and left torso side support pads secured to the opposite ends of said band, a lumbar support pad, and flexible strap means secured to the opposite ends of said band and carrying said lumbar pad, said lumbar pad being vertically elongated and secured at its midpoint to said flexible strap means, said right and left torso side support pads being vertically elongated and secured at their lower ends to said band, and a flexible strap buckle-connected to form a loop and secured to the upper ends of said right and left torso side support pads.

6. A surgical brace as set forth in claim 1 wherein said vertical stay member includes a vertically adjustable extension portion upon which the sternal support pad is pivotally mounted.

7. A surgical brace as set forth in claim 2 wherein said vertical stay member includes a vertically adjustable extension portion upon which the sternal support pad is pivotally mounted 8. A surgical brace as set forth in claim 3 wherein said vertical stay member includes a vertically adjustable extension portion upon which the sternal support pad is pivotally mounted.

9. A surgical brace as set forth in claim 4 wherein said vertical stay member includes a vertically adjustable extension portion upon which the sternal support pad is pivotally mounted.

10. A surgical brace as set forth in claim 5 wherein said vertical stay member includes a vertically adjustable extension portion upon which the sternal support pad is pivotally mounted.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 639,072 Lyons Dec. 12, 1899 2,453,370 Hittenberger Nov. 9, 1948 2,582,930 Jewett Jan. 15, 1952 OTHER REFERENCES The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, for July 1936, pages 784-6. (Copy in Scientific Library.)

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US639072 *Nov 5, 1898Dec 12, 1899Mary LyonsBody-brace.
US2453370 *Sep 16, 1946Nov 9, 1948Hittenberger Herman GSurgical brace
US2582930 *May 5, 1949Jan 15, 1952Blairs Braces IncSurgical brace
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2871850 *Aug 8, 1957Feb 3, 1959Charles Peckham ArthurOrthopedic spinal brace
US3094984 *Sep 1, 1961Jun 25, 1963Florida Brace CorpSurgical brace
US3095875 *Aug 28, 1961Jul 2, 1963Florida Brace CorpSurgical brace
US3220407 *Oct 8, 1962Nov 30, 1965S H Camp & CompanyHyperextension back brace
US3274996 *Sep 1, 1961Sep 27, 1966Florida Brace CorpSurgical brace
US3346257 *Mar 8, 1965Oct 10, 1967Whitney James WClub swing training device
US3771513 *Dec 8, 1971Nov 13, 1973Velazquez TSpinal brace
US3809394 *Sep 18, 1972May 7, 1974M HallTwo bar exerciser
US3945376 *Dec 12, 1974Mar 23, 1976Otto Bock Orthopedic Industry, Inc.Orthopedic brace (orthesis)
US4173973 *Jun 30, 1978Nov 13, 1979Hendricks David JHyperextension back brace
US4285336 *Oct 23, 1979Aug 25, 1981Orthomedics, Inc.Scoliosis orthotic system
US5342289 *Aug 27, 1990Aug 30, 1994Kurt MunnyHyperextension orthesis with movable front pad
US5363863 *Apr 23, 1993Nov 15, 1994Charles LelliLumbar support belt
US5599287 *Oct 3, 1995Feb 4, 1997Peach U.S., Inc.Hyperextension orthotic apparatus useful for treating pain associated with spinal disorders
US5632724 *Feb 8, 1996May 27, 1997United States Manufacturing CompanyHyperextension thoraco-lumbar brace
US6190343 *Dec 10, 1999Feb 20, 2001Bio Cybernetics InternationalCruciform anterior spinal hyperextension orthosis
US7837639 *Nov 23, 2010Carey Paul JinrightAdjustable brace for correcting a forward lean
US8066654Jul 31, 2007Nov 29, 2011Orthomerica Products, Inc.Adjustable extension compression posterior spinal orthosis and method
US8308670Sep 30, 2011Nov 13, 2012Orthomerica Products, Inc.Adjustable extension compression posterior spinal orthosis and method
US8657769Nov 3, 2010Feb 25, 2014Ossur HfThoracic lumbar sacral orthosis
US8926537Sep 14, 2012Jan 6, 2015Ossur HfOrthopedic device for treatment of the back
US8945034Mar 17, 2014Feb 3, 2015Ossur HfOrthopedic device for treatment of the back
US9220625Feb 5, 2014Dec 29, 2015Ossur HfThoracic lumbar sacral orthosis
US9314363Jan 24, 2014Apr 19, 2016Ossur HfOrthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
US20030220594 *May 24, 2002Nov 27, 2003United States Manufacturing Company, Inc.Torso orthosis apparatus and method
US20100069806 *Mar 18, 2010Carey Paul JinrightAdjustable brace for correcting a forward lean
US20100204630 *Jul 31, 2007Aug 12, 2010Sandifer Alan TAdjustable extension compression posterior spinal orthosis and method
US20100318010 *Oct 10, 2008Dec 16, 2010Sandifer Alan TAdjustable posterior spinal orthosis
US20110105971 *May 5, 2011Arni Thor IngimundarsonThoracic lumbar sacral orthosis
US20140330187 *May 6, 2013Nov 6, 2014Joel PerezScoliosis Brace
US20150018736 *Oct 1, 2014Jan 15, 2015Aspen Medical Partners, LlcScoliosis Brace
USRE31564 *Nov 12, 1981Apr 24, 1984 Hyperextension back brace
WO1991003216A1 *Aug 27, 1990Mar 21, 1991Kurt MunnyHyperextension orthesis with movable front pad
WO2006068459A1 *Dec 21, 2004Jun 29, 2006Loon Petrus Johannes Maria VanBrace and method for treatment of spinal deformities
WO2008093023A1 *Dec 19, 2007Aug 7, 2008Faouen PatrickDevice for lordosis support of the back for correcting the posture
WO2009113053A1 *Mar 9, 2009Sep 17, 2009Koala Health Accessories Ltd.Pelvic anchor brace and pinal support
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/19
International ClassificationA61F5/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/024
European ClassificationA61F5/02E