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Publication numberUS2808664 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 8, 1957
Filing dateMay 26, 1955
Priority dateMay 26, 1955
Publication numberUS 2808664 A, US 2808664A, US-A-2808664, US2808664 A, US2808664A
InventorsFinken Walter S, Frieder Leonard P
Original AssigneeFrieder
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protective vamp
US 2808664 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 8, 1957 L.. P. FRIEDER ET AL 2,808,664

PROTECTIVE vAMP Filed May 2G, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet l IN V EN TORS n ML ATTORNEY 0d. s, 1957 L. P. FRIEDER EAL 2,808,664

PROTECTIVE VAMP Filed May 26, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 l INVENTORS LEONARD P FTQ/EDE@ n 7' /NKSA/ 1 H TTORNEY PROTECTIVE vAMr Application May 26, 1955, Serial No. 511,273,

9 claims. (ci. .a6- 72) Our invention relates to aprotective vamp and more particularly to aprotective vamp for a safety ls hoe which protects the foot of the wearer from injury from, sharp objects penetrating the portion of the shoe vamp adjacent the edge of the shoe sole in front of the shoe ankle seam. In the prior art safety shoes are provided with protective soles for protecting the, foot of the wearerv against injuryfrom sharp objects penetrating-the sole of the shoe. In one form of safety shoe the protection is afforded by a metal plate or the like. formed as a part of the safety shoe sole. These metal plates are rigid and do not iiex with the wearers foot. They do not permit shoes to breathe properly. Alternately, protection is provided in safety shoes of the prior art by a softer, more flexible material than metal. When such a material is employed, the resulting shoe construction necessarilyis bulky and awkward if the desired degree of'protection is provided.

In our copending application Serial No. 487,269,5led

February 10; 1955, we disclose a safety inner sole which overcomes the disadvantages of` safety'soles of the prior art.' As is pointed out in the copending application, this protective inner sole may be formed as a part of a safety shoe sole if, desired.

' Inv addition to the problem of protecting the wearers foot from injury by objects penetrating a 'shoe' sole, the

further problem, exists of protecting the' wearers foot against injury by objects cutting or penetrating the shoe vamp in the area just above the sole. This problem is especially important in the area along the edges ofthe shoe sole where cuts may occur. when the wearer trips over sharp objects. In an attempt to solve this problem, pro;- tective soles in shoes of the prior art are extended inthe plane ofthe sole out beyond the vamp ofthe safety shoe. This clumsy and cumbersome construction, however, gives rise to additional dangers of injuryto thewearer as a resultlof. falls from stumbling o r similar accidents;Y

Wehave invented a protective vamp for a safety shoe which prevents injury to the foot" ofthe wearer inthe vamp area of the shoe around the shoe'sole. Our pro# tective vamp islight and liexible. Itpermits theshoe to breathe properly.- Itmay be formed Vas a part of the shoe to give a compact, comfortable shoe construction.

One objectof our invention -is'to provide' a protective vamp `for a safety'V shoe whichv protects'thefootl of thev wearer'inY the area of the shoe vamp around andadjacent tectivevamp forasafety shoe which may be'or'med-fas a parto'f'theshoe in a compact and comfortable shoe construction- Other andfurther objects of our invention will appe ar v from-the following descriptionI Ingeneral, our invention contemplates the provision of a-safety shoe protective vamp' formed from synthetic, I

ice

tective vamp to conform with the shoevamp or portion of the shoe above the soleand' the welt ink frontv 'ofthe ankleseam. `We form our vamp Witha base substan' tiall'y parallel with the plane of the'shoe sole and'with a portion npstandi-ng from thev base and conforming with a portion ofthe shoe vamp. In one form of our invert-'- tion corrugations on'the opstanding portion ofthe pro te'ctive vampY lend' flexibility to the construction and ensure a smooth and' snugl fitl of'the protective vamp iiithe shoe. We may make our protective vamp independently and embody it in the shoe" during manufacture.` Alter# nately wemay formcur protective vamp from 'an extension of a laminate, or" laminate sole disclosed in 'our' said depending application.`

' In a second' embodiment'of'our invention 'the opstand'- ing portion of the vampV includes' at' least a pair o f 'lariih nate's, Veach o fwlii'ch is"t`orrnedT with tapered notches `terminatingin arcuate apicesfin tliebase of the vamp. This embodiment vof o'ur invention-1 may `be independently formedand embodied in a sfety 'shoe during manufaeturey orv it'may be 'made from extensions of laminatesof our protective inner' sole disclosed in our said Acopendirig application.

In 'the-'accompanying drawings which form part of the instant` specification andwhieh-are to vbe read inconjunction therewith andinwhich likeY reference numerals are used'tofindcate like parts in the various views:

Figr'e- 12 -is a"fragmentary perspectiveA view, Vwith parts in section, of a safety shoe inclndingone form o ffo'ur protective vamp' triade independently and embodied-in the shoe'dnring'ntanufacturef Figure v2`isI aperspective viewoi the form of our pro'-` tectivevamp shownin Figure'l ybefore it embodied one laminate o f which is extended'and shaped to forin a PPQtecti've vamp similar'tov that shown in Figurel'l. Figure V5 'i'sva fragmentary'p'erspective view,"with parts inV section, of asafety shoe including a second' embodiment of'our protectivevamp made independently andi embodied 'in the shoe during manufacture.

Figpre 6is aY perspective view vof the embodiment ofourprotective vamp 'shown' in Figure 5V before it is embodied'iii'a safety shoe Figure 7 isa fragmentary sectional view of a safety. shoeincluding an embodiment ofv our protective vamp` similar toy that shown in Figure 5""made`from an exten# sion of a laminateof'a protective inner sole. Y

Figure 8 is a perspective view of a safety inner sole,

a pair of laminates ofwhich are extendedand shaped to formaprotective vamp -siinilar to that shown' in Figure 5 2 More particularly referring now to Figures l and.2"oi" the `dawings,`a safety shoe providedY with one form-M1 our protective vamp' includes anoutsole 10, an insoleglit and` awelt'l. Stitching" 16 secures the welt '14j toa* periplier'al'lipl formed'on vthe underside'of lthei'nsoler 1 2; rvstitching', `zusecures' rhewelt nafta the outsole-"110':

in assembledi'ielationslip, is`- conventinaliin* sli manufacture.

The` safety Yshoe-witlrwhich 'our protectiveevamp is used f includes a Ashoe vamp-2 2 formed of a double thickness' ofleather'orthe'like. `Ascan be seen byreferenceto Figi" ure 1', stitching16`passes` thro-ughf'tlie shoe vamp `2 2-'to rei' and A the-f insole l 12. 'Weg s, 'ofourfpro'tective inner f 3 insole 12 and the outsole 10. Optionally, stitching 26 may be used to secure the protective inner sole 24 to insole 12. As is pointed out in our copending application, the protective inner sole 24 protects the wearers foot from injury by sharp objects or the like which might penetrate the sole of an ordinary shoe. It will be appreciated, however, that the protection afforded by the inner sole 24 does not extend to the area of the vamp 22 around and adjacent to the periphery of the sole of the shoe. If the wearer tripped over a sharp blade Aor stepped on the edge of a blade so as to force itV or a similar sharp object through the edge of the sole and the portion of the vamp adjacent the sole edge, a severe injury to his foot would be likely to result. This is the nature of injury against which our protective vamp guards the wearers foot.

tAs can best be seen by reference to Figure Y2, we form one embodiment of our protective vamp with a base 28 in the plane of the shoe sole. Base 28 extends around the periphery of the shoe sole in front of the ankle seam of the shoe. Our protective vamp also includes a portion 30 extending upwardly from base' 28 and conforming with the shape of the shoe vamp 22. Referring again to Figure i, we assemble our protective vamp with the shoe so that stitching 16 passes through the protective vamp substantially along the line of juncture between base 28 and the upstanding portion 30. Stitching 16 serves to retain the protective vamp in its assembled position in the shoe. We secure a canvas liner 32 by means such as glue or the like over the inner surface of the shoe and over the ,portion 30 of the protective vamp. If desired, a sponge rubber cushion 34 may be glued over the inside of the sole. Referring again to Figure 2, we provide the upstandiug portion 30 of our protective vamp with corrugations 356Y tapering downwardly from the edge of the upstanding portion 30 to the base 28. Corrugations 36 permit portion 3f) of the vamp to flex with the wearers foot. For the same reason, we cut out the central portion of base 28 to leave a scalloped edge 38. j

We form our protective vamp of synthetic, fibrous, resin-impregnated material. The vamp may, lfor eX- ample, be made of any suitable matted, felted, woven, knitted, or braided fibrous material. Preferably, we employ a mat of spun glass ftbers, but we may use any other laments, such as those of nylon. We impregnate the mat of fibers with a thermoplastic or thermosetting resinous material, suchas, for example, polyethylene plastic, allyl plastic, polystyrene plastic, phenol formaldehyde, or urea formaldehyde resins. Preferably, We use a polyester resin. While we have shown this form ofour protective vamp as including only a single thickness of fibrous, resin-impregnated material for purposes of simplicity in illustration, it will readily be understood that, if desired or necessary, we may use a number of thicknesses or laminates assembled in the manner described in our said copending application to form our protective vamp.

In the form of our invention shown in Figures 3 and 4, we form our protective vamp from one extended laminate of a protective inner sole of the type disclosed in our said copending application. Conveniently, the protective inner sole, indicated generally by the reference character 40, is sandwichedV between the shoe insole `12 and outsole With portions of the shoe vamp V22 extending thereunder. `The protective innersole 40 includes a number ofk laminations necessary to, afford the requiredY degree, of protection for the wearers foot. It may, for example, in-

clude a top laminate 42, a -middle laminate44, and a' bottom laminate 46. We retain laminates 42, 44, and,

46 in assembled condition in the manner disclosed inour said copending application. tective vamp We provide the portion of one of the inner ment of our protective vamp has a 'base formed bythe In order to form our pro-A portion of the inner sole underlying the shoe vamp. We shape the extending portion of the bottom laminate 46 to form an upstanding portion 48, as can readily be seen by reference to Figure 4. Corrugations 50 tapering from the upper edge of portion '48 downwardly toward the inner sole 40 ensure a snug and smooth t of portion 48 in the shoe. As was the case with the form of our protective vamp shown in Figures l and 2, we dispose the protective vamp including portion 48 between the shoe vamp 22 and a canvas liner 32. The stitching 16 which secures the insole 12 to the Welt 1,4 passes through the portion 48 of the protective vamp extending upwardly from the inner sole 40. If desired, a cushion 34 may also be used in this form of protective shoe. It is to be understood that while we have shown our protective vamp as being formed by an extension of the bottom laminate 46 of the inner sole 49, it may, if desired, be formed from any one of the other laminates. We may, -if desired, employ more than a single laminate of the protective inner sole 46 to form our protective vamp. In any case, in this form of our invention, the protective vamp is formed of the same fibrous, resin-impregnated material of which the laminates of the protective sole are formed.

In the embodiment of our invention shown in Figures 5 and 6, we form our protective vamp with a base, indicated generally by the reference character 52, including a pair of laminates S4 and 56 of synthetic resin-irnpregnated, fibrous material. Laminates 54 and S6 include respective upstanding portions 58 and 60 conforming generally to the portion of the shoe vamp 22 adjacent base 52. Y The laminates 54 and 56 of this form of our invention may be formed of the same material of which the forms of our invention shown in Figures l to 4 are made. lnorder to provide exibility for our protective vamp in this embodiment of our invention, we form each of the upstanding portions 58 and 60 with la. plurality of notches 62, each tapering Vdownwardly from the edge of a portion 58 or 60 to an arcuate apex 64 in the base 52. We stagger the notohes62 of portion 58 with respect to the notches 62 of portion 60 to'ensure adequate protection tothe wearer-s foot while permitting the-vamp'to dex. We cut out the central portion of base 52 to form a scalloped edge 66 similar to edge 38 to give additional flexibility to the vamp.

Referring now to Figures 7 and 8, we form our protective vamp from a safety inner sole, indicated generally by the reference character 68, including, for example, four laminates 76, '72, 74, and 76 of fibrous, resin-impregnated material. We provide the portion of one of the laminates,

whichmay conveniently bethe bottom laminate 76, with an extension in the region of the shoe vamp. We shape this extension of laminate 76 to form an opstanding portion 78 on laminate '76. We form a second upstanding p0rtion 80 from an extension Yof one of the other laminates, which may conveniently be the laminate 7 4,r in the region of the vamp ofthe safety shoe. Notches 82 tapering downwardly from the respective edges of the portions 78 and. 80 to arcuate apices 84 in the sole 68 make this form of our protective vamp flexible. As is readily apparent from an examination'of- Figure, we Ystagger the notches 82 of the vportion 78 with respect to the notches 82 of the portion 80 to lend flexibility to this form of our vamp. As

can be seenbyrreference to Figure 7, we dispose thisV form of our protective vamp between the shoe .vamp 22` Vmake these forms of our protective vamp flexible.

While we have shown the forms ofour linvention of Figures 5 to 8 as including only'a pair of layers or lam- .inates of resin-impregnated, fibrous material', it will-*be understood that additional layers may be usedl if desired.

When additional layers are used, the taperednotches of,

each of the respective layers are staggered with respect to the notches of all the other layers.

In use of the form of our invention shown in Figures 1 and 2, we form our protective vamp with a base 28 cut out to make a scalloped edge 38. Our vamp includes an upstanding portion 30 formed with tapered corrugations 36. The corrugations 36 ensure a smooth and snug fit of the protective vamp in the shoe. In addition, they permit the vamp to ex with the shoe. The scalloped edge formed in base 28 also permits the vamp to flex. While We have shown in Figure l our protective vamp -as being employed in a shoe including one of our protective inner soles 24, it is to be understood that it may be employed independently of the inner sole, if desired. Our protective vamp protects the wearers foot from injuries resulting from sharp objects cutting the edge of the shoe sole and the portion of the shoe vamp 22 extending upwardly from the sole.

In the form of our invention shown in Figures 3 and 4, we form our protective vamp from one laminate of our protective inner sole disclosed in our said copending application. This form of our inner sole has a solid base formed by one of the inner sole laminates. It includes an upstanding portion 48 similar to the upstanding portion 30 of the form of our invention shown in Figures l and 2. The form of our invention shown in Figures 3 and 4 functions in a manner similar to that shown in Figures 1 and 2 to protect the wearers foot from injury by sharp objects penetrating the portion of the shoe vamp 22 ad jacent the shoe sole in front of the ankle seam of th shoe.

In use of the embodiment of our invention shown in Figures 5 and 6, we form our protective vamp from a pair of fibrous, resin-impregnated laminates 54 and 56 including respective upstanding portions S8 and 60. Staggered notches 62 terminating in apices 64 in the respective upstanding portions give flexibility to the vamp. The staggered arrangement of the notches ensures adequate protection for the foot of the wearer around the periphery of the vamp of the safety shoe.

We form the embodiment of our protective vamp shown in Figures 7 and 8 from a pair of laminates which may conveniently be the bottom two laminates 74 and 76 of a protective inner sole 68. The respective laminates 74 and 76 include tapered notches 82 which permit the protective vamp to flex. The notches 82 of the respective'portions 78 and 80 are staggered to ensure adequate protection to the foot of the wearer.

It will be seen that we have accomplished the objects of our invention. We have provided a protective vamp for safety shoes which protects the foot of the wearer against injury from sharp objects which penetrate the shoe vamp 22 in the area adjacent the sole of the shoe. Our protective vamp is light and compact for the protection afforded thereby. We form our protective vamp with means permitting it to flex with the shoe with which it is used. Our protective vamp may be formed as a separate part of a shoe or it may be formed from a laminate of a protective inner sole such as is disclosed in our said copending application.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of our claims. It is further obvious that various changes may be made in details within the scope of our claims without departing from the spirit of our invention. It is therefore to be understood that our invention is not to be limited to the specific details shown and described.

Having thus described our invention, whatwe claim is:

1. A protective vamp for a safety shoe having a sole and a vamp including in combination a base consisting of plastic impregnated brous material and having a portion extending upwardly from said base and conforming generally to the shape of said vamp, said upwardly extending portion consisting of the same material of which said base consists, said base being cut out to form a scalloped edge.

2. In a safety shoe inner sole having a number of 1aminates formed from synthetic resin-impregnated fibrous material, a protective Vamp formed from an extension of one of said laminates, said protective vamp including a portion upstanding from said one of said laminates.v

3. In a safety shoe inner sole as in claim 2 in which said upstanding portion is formed with corrugations tapering from the periphery of the upstanding portion to said one of said laminates.

4. In a shoe having an insole and an outsole and a vamp and a welt, a protective vamp including a base consisting of synthetic resin-impregnated fibrous material disposed between said insole and said outsole and having a portion upstanding from said base, said upstanding portion conforming generally to the shape of said vamp, said upstanding portion consisting of the same material which said base consists of.

5. A protective vamp for a safety shoe having a sole and a vamp including in combination a base formed of a pair of layers consisting of plastic-impregnated fibrous material, each of said layers including a portion extending upwardly from said base and conforming generally to the shape of said vamp.

6. A protective vamp for a safety shoe having a sole and a vamp including in combination a base formed of a pair of layers of plastic-irnpregnated brous material, each of said layers including a portion extending upwardly from said base and conforming generally to the shape of said vamp, each of said portions being formed with a plurality of tapered notches.

7. A protective vamp for a safety shoe having a sole and a vamp including in combination a base formed of a pair of layers of plastic-impregnated fibrous material, ea-ch of said layers including a portion extending upwardly from said base and conforming generally to the shape of said vamp, each of said upstanding portions being formed with a plurality of tapered notches terminating in respective arcuate apices disposed in the plane of the base.

8. A protective vamp for a safety shoe having a sole and a vamp including in combination a base formed of a pair of layers of plastic-impregnated brous material, each of said layers including a portion extending upwardly from said base and conforming generally to the shape of said vamp, each of said portions being formed with a plurality of tapered notches, the construction being such that the tapered notches of one of said upstanding portions are staggered with respect to the notches of the other of said upstanding portions.

9. A protective vamp for a safety shoe having a sole and a vamp including in combination a base formed of plastic impregnated fibrous material and having a portion extending upwardly from said base and conforming generally to the shape of said vamp, said upstanding portion being constructed with corrugations tapering from the periphery of said upstanding portion toward said base.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS D. 27,361 Waters July 13, 1897 1,809,845 Haas June 16, 1931 1,952,758 Josephson Mar. 27, 1934 2,229,387 Parker Jan. 21, 1941 2,277,941 Almy Mar. 31, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS 3,895 Great Britain Nov. 10, 1875 of 1875

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1809845 *Mar 11, 1930Jun 16, 1931Edward HaasSide guard for shoes
US1952758 *Jul 13, 1932Mar 27, 1934Josephson Helmer GArmored shoe
US2229387 *Oct 20, 1939Jan 21, 1941William Parker ClarenceSole protector for rubber boots
US2277941 *Jun 12, 1941Mar 31, 1942Armstrong Cork CoManufacture of shoes
USD27361 *May 13, 1897Jul 13, 1897 Design for a metallic shoe-tip
GB187503895A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2891329 *Jul 10, 1957Jun 23, 1959Good Stuart ASafety shoes
US2994137 *Mar 11, 1960Aug 1, 1961Anderson Ralph GFoot protector
US4506460 *May 25, 1983Mar 26, 1985Rudy Marion FSpring moderator for articles of footwear
US4776110 *Aug 24, 1987Oct 11, 1988Shiang Joung LinInsole-ventilating shoe
US20120137545 *Dec 6, 2010Jun 7, 2012Champagne GaetanFootbed for a skate boot
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/72.00R, 36/44
International ClassificationA43B7/32
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/32
European ClassificationA43B7/32