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Publication numberUS2810146 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 22, 1957
Filing dateJan 11, 1955
Priority dateJan 11, 1955
Publication numberUS 2810146 A, US 2810146A, US-A-2810146, US2810146 A, US2810146A
InventorsJarvis Ernest L
Original AssigneeJarvis Ernest L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Soap receptacle
US 2810146 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 22, 1957 L. JARVIS SOAP RECEPTACLE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 7 Filed Jan. 11, 1955 FIE 1 Oct. 22, 1957 E. L. JARVIS SOAP RECEPTACLE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 11, 1955 w 6 1% r HM fi 4: z ww w Unitficl States Patent SOAP RECEPTACLE Ernest L. Jarvis, Chicago, 11].

Application January 11, 1955, Serial No. 481,144

' 2 Claims. (Cl. 1s-1z2 The present invention relates to soap receptacles, and more particularly to a soap receptacle adapted to enclose a bar of soap to facilitate handling of the soap in a washing operation.

The primary object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved receptacle for enclosing and handling a bar of soap.

Another object is to provide a soap receptacle having a plurality of narrow inwardly extending ribs on its inner surface to space the soap from the inner surface of the receptacle and to facilitate the formation of soap lather during a washing operation.

A further object is to provide a receptacle into which small soap remnants may be inserted for convenient use.

The invention is illustrated in a preferred embodiment in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view;

Fig. 2, a side elevational view;

Fig. 3, a top plan view;

Fig. 4, a sectional view taken as indicated on line 4-4 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5, a sectional view taken as indicated on line 5-5 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6, a broken side elevational view partly in section showing one of an opposed pair of sidewalls folded inwardly so as to be doubled between the unfolded pair of sidewalls;

Fig. 7, an end elevational view of the receptacle as shown in Fig. 6;

Fig. 8, a fragmentary top plan view of Fig. 6; and

Fig. 9, a sectional view taken as indicated on line 9-9 of Fig. 8.

In the embodiment illustrated, a soap receptacle, generally designated 10, is preferably provided with a pair of similar opposed sidewalls 11 and 12, a second pair of similar opposed sidewalls 13 and 14, a bottom member 15, and a top member 16 which is made from an elastic material. The entire receptacle may be formed from a synthetic rubber, such as neoprene, or from some other flexibly elastic material which is oil and water resistant, and which will not corrode or scratch the hands when used.

Each of the sidewalls 11-14 and the bottom member are generally provided with a number of perforations 17 through which soap lather may pass during a washing operation. An opening 18 in the top member 16 is bounded by a narrow elastic neck portion 19 which may be stretched to permit a bar of soap 20 to be inserted into the receptacle 10. The top member 16 may also be provided with a pair of holes 21 so that the receptacle may be suspended from a peg or nail for drainage after a washing operation.

After the bar of soap 20 has been used for a period of time and has become reduced in size, a fresh bar of soap may be inserted adjacent the original bar so that the original bar can be utilized in its entirety. The constricted neck portion 19 is small enough so that small pieces of soap, which would probably be Wasted or lost down the drain under normal circumstances, may be in- 2,810,146 Patented Oct. 22, 1957 serted and retained within the receptacle 10. The small bits of soap can be used in their entirety and they are much easier to handle when used in the receptacle.

The inner surface of each of the sidewalls 11-14 is provided with longitudinally extending ribs 11a, 12a, 13a and 14a, respectively, each of which preferably bisects its respective sidewall. A pair of crossed ribs 22 and 23 are positioned on the inner surface of the bottom member 15, and each of the crossed ribs preferably joins the ribs of a pair of opposed sidewalls, as best shown in Fig. 5. It is apparent that when a new bar of soap 20 is inserted into the receptacle 10, the ribs 22 and 23 and the ribs 11a-14a will space the bar of soap from the inner surfaces of the sidewalls and the bottom member.

The outer surfaces of the sidewalls 11-14 and the bottom member 15 of the receptacle 10 are preferably provided with elongated grooves or lines of fold 11b, 12b, 13b, 14b, 22b and 23b, as best seen in Figs. 1 through 4. The grooves are usually positioned in the outer surfaces directly opposite the internal ribs Ila-14a, 22 and 23. From the corners of the receptacle, each of the sidewalls is preferably inclined inwardly toward its respective groove and bisecting rib, as best seen in Figs. 3 and 4.

As can be seen in Figs. 6 through 9, these grooves 11b-14b, 22b and 23b provide fold lines along which the sidewalls and adjacent portions of the bottom member may be conveniently folded. Preferably, the smaller pair of similar opposed sidewalls 11 and 12 is folded inwardly so that each sidewall 11 and 12 is doubled between the unfolded pair of sidewalls 13 and 14. The bottom member 17 is not completely folded inwardly. Opposite edge portions of the bottom member 17 are doubled inwardly of the receptacle along the groove 23b until the opposite ends of the groove 23 are very nearly colinear with grooves 11b and 12b. When the receptacle is in this flattened position, as shown in Fig. 6, a single stroke of a punch press will provide perforations 17 in all four sidewalls, in the bottom member, and will punch out holes 21 just below the elastic neck portion 19.

To use the receptacle 10, a bar of soap 20 is first inserted after which the receptacle is massaged in the hands to work up cleansing lather from the soap. The receptacle itself is used in a washing operation and its scrubbing action facilitates the removal of dirt and irnpurities. In addition, the receptacle protects the soap and helps keep it clean by preventing dirt from being forced into the surface of the soap. The soap does not directly contact a dirty surface, and the soap lather keeps most of the dirt in suspension until it can be washed away.

The lathering of a cake of soap is greatly promoted by the present receptacle. The internal ribs 11a14a, 22 and 23 frictionally engage the soap surface when the receptacle is massaged and accentuate the lathering effect. Actual tests have shown that soap used in the receptacle produces over three times as much lather as when used alone.

When a washing operation has been completed, the receptacle and soap are sprayed by cold water and the receptacle is suspended from a peg or the like for drainage. The angularity of the sidewalls 1114 and the ribs 11a14a, 22 and 23 space the soap from the inner surface of the receptacle. This spacing permits free and adequate circulation of air so that the bar of soap will not adhere to the receptacle. In addition, the soap will quickly dry and not become mushy as is frequently the case in bath tub and lavatory soap holders. This feature has been found to triple the normal life of a bar of soap.

The foregoing detailed description is given for clearness of understanding only and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom, for some modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. A soap receptacle for enclosing and handling a bar of soap comprising, a collapsible flexible elastic bag having a top member, a bottom member, a first pair of similar opposed side -walls and a second pair of similar opposed side Walls, the top member having an open stretchable elastic neck portion through which a bar of soap may be inserted into the 'bag, the bottom member and side walls having a plurality of perforations through which soap lather may pass, the outer surface of each side wall of each pair of side walls being longitudinally centrally provided with a fold line extending from the top member to the bottom member for resiliently urging the longitudinal central portions of each side wall inwardly, the inner surface of each side wall of each pair of side walls being longitudinally centrally provided with an inwardly extending rib coextensive with the fold line of each side wall, the inner surface of the bottom member being provided with a pair of crossed ribs forming continuations of the ribs on the inner surfaces of the side walls, the fold lines of the side walls regulating the free inward collapsing of the bag, the ribs on the side walls and the bottom members facilitating formation of soap lather during washing, and the fold lines and ribs on the side walls and bottom member spacing the soap inwardly from the perforated side walls and bottom members to facilitate air circulation through the bag and drying of the soap.

2. A soap receptacle for enclosing and handling a bar of soap comprising, a collapsible flexible elastic bag having a top member, a bottom member, a first pair of similar opposed side walls and a second pair of similar opposed side walls, the top member having an open stretchable elastic neck portion through which a bar of soap may be inserted into the bag, the bottom member and side walls having a plurality of perforations through which soap lather may pass, the outer surface of each side Wall of each pair of side walls being longitudinally centrally provided with a fold line extending from the top member to the bottom member for resiliently urging the longitudinal central portions of each side wall inwardly, the inner surface of each side wall of each pair of side walls being longitudinally centrally provided with an inwardly extending rib coextensive with the fold line of each side wall, the inner surface of the bottom member being provided with a pair of crossed ribs forming continuations of the ribs on the inner surfaces of the side Walls, the fold lines of the side walls regulating the free inward collapsing of the bag, the ribs on the side walls and the bottom member facilitating formation of soap lather during washing, the fold lines and ribs 0n the side walls and bottom member spacing the soap inwardly from the perforated side walls and bottom member to facilitate air circulation through the bag and drying of the soap, and means in the top member for suspending the bag.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,225,089 Vadnais Dec. 17, 1940 2,235,981 Coe et a1. Mar. 25, 1941 2,286,117 Sidnell June 9, 1942 2,290,378 Motto July 21, 1942 2,363,971 Katz Nov. 28, 1944 2,611,144 Lambert Sept. 23, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2225089 *Jul 22, 1936Dec 17, 1940Howard L FischerLaundry bag
US2235981 *Mar 13, 1937Mar 25, 1941 Method of making rubber laundry
US2286117 *May 9, 1939Jun 9, 1942Seiberling Latex Products CompMethod of making perforate articles
US2290378 *Jul 14, 1941Jul 21, 1942Motto MaryCombined bath brush, soap holder, and spray
US2363971 *Jul 1, 1943Nov 28, 1944Morris KatzVentilated shopping bag and the method of constructing the same
US2611144 *Feb 18, 1948Sep 23, 1952Georges LambertPerforated soap-enclosing cover
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2920417 *Jan 22, 1958Jan 12, 1960Sylvia T WertheimerDetergent-solution dispensing container
US4906118 *Feb 16, 1989Mar 6, 1990Crooks Stuart GLotion applicator
US5547302 *Jul 29, 1994Aug 20, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyTwist-up product dispenser having conformable apertured applicator surface
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/266, 383/43, 383/9, 383/103
International ClassificationA47K5/00, A47K5/14
Cooperative ClassificationA47K5/14
European ClassificationA47K5/14