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Publication numberUS2811083 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1957
Filing dateSep 18, 1953
Priority dateSep 18, 1953
Publication numberUS 2811083 A, US 2811083A, US-A-2811083, US2811083 A, US2811083A
InventorsSimjian Luther G
Original AssigneeReflectone Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chair with moving seat and mirror
US 2811083 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1957 1.. G. SIMJIAN I 2,81

CHAIR wrm MOVING SEAT ANDIMIRROR Filed Sept. 18, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. LUTHER G. SIMJIAN ATTORNEY.

Oct. 29, 1957 1.. e. SlMJlAN CHAIR WITH MOVI NG SEAT AND MIRROR 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 18, 1953 INVENTOR. LUTHER G. SI MJIAN llxx ATTORNEY.

Oct. 29, 1957 L. G. SIMJIAN 2,811,083

0mm WITH MOVING SEAT AND MIRROR Filed Sept. 18, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 FIG. 8

INVENTOR. LUTHER G. SIMJIAN ATTORNEY ventional boudoir chair.

United States Patent CHAIR WITH MOVING SEAT AND MIRROR Application September 18, 1953, Serial No. 380,921

13 Claims. (Cl. 88-92) This invention relates to chairs, and more particularly to a chair of the type set forth in my Patent 2,510,351 granted me on June 6, 1950.

In the chair disclosed in my patent, a chair seat is mounted for rotation relatively to a chair base on a predetermined axis. Mounted also for rotation relatively to the chair base, but on an axis offset from the axis of rotation of the chair seat, is a mirror. Means are provided between the chair seat and the mirror so that as the seat rotates, the mirror is rotated, the relative rotation of the two being so arranged that the mirror will be in a position to reflect properly the image of anyone seated on the chair.

While the chair forming the invention of this patent, and certain earlier patents granted me, has achieved considerable commercial success because of the very considerable contribution made thereby, there have been certain drawbacks because of the visual appearance presented by the chair. I have now conceived a chair having all the functions of that of my Patent 2,510,351, and yet presenting to the casual viewer the appearance of a con- In addition, the chair forming my new concept to be covered in this application is capable of functioning as a conventional chair, as well as presenting the appearance of a conventional chair.

As a particular feature of my invention I provide my chair with a chair base that may be substantially similar to that shown in my Patent 2,510,351, but arranged for the mounting of the mirror on a back formed for the chair, this back being rotatable through rotation of the seat. As a further feature of the invention, I provide means for locking the seat and the chair back carrying the mirror, against rotation relatively to'the chair base and one another, preferably when the mirror is out of viewing position. As a further detailed feature of this part of the invention, the mirror is actually mounted within an internal compartment formed in the back of the chair, this compartment being adapted to be opened so that the mirror may be moved into a position above the back of the chair.

It is a'further detailed feature of the invention that the locking means for locking the chair seat, and preferably the back also relatively to the chair base, are actuated and controlled by the movement of the mirror. Thus, when the mirror is within the 'compartmentof the chair back, the seat and back are locked against rotation, while when the mirror is placed in a position above the chair back, as in my earlier patent referred to above, the seat is free for rotation and its rotation will effect movement of the mirror in substantially the same manner as in my patent. As an additional feature of my invention, the mirror in one modification is counterbalanced for ready movement into and out of the internal compartment of the chair back. In a second modification the mirror is pivotally mounted for movement relatively to the chair back, and in this modification the control of the locking means by the mirror is exercised through the medium of a Bowden wire actuated by the mirror as it moves relatively to the chair back.

r, 2,811,083 Patented Oct. 29, 1957 ICC A still further feature of the invention resides in the construction of the locking means, this means being arranged to operate automatically when the mirror is lowered and when the chair seat and chair back are moved into predetermined alignment.

I have thus outlined rather broadly the more important features of my invention in order that the detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood, and in order that my contribution to the art may be better appreciated. There are, of course, additional features of my invention that will be described hereinafter and which will form the subject of the claims appended hereto. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception on which my disclosure is based may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures for carrying out the several purposes of my invention.

Referring now to the drawings,

Fig. 1 is an elevation of the chair of my invention with the mirror shown contained within the compartment formed in the chair back.

Fig. 2 is a view of the rear of the back of the chair of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a view showing the upper part of the chair of Fig. l with the mirror raised to its upper viewing position.

Fig. 4 is a view of the upper part of the chair shown in Fig. l with the covering panel of the back removed.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken along lines 5-5 of Fig. 6 illustrating the construction of the back of the chair, as well as the mounting of the seat and the means whereby the rotation of the seat effects rotation of the back of the chair.

Fig. 6 is a plan view of the operating parts of the chair.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged view of certain of the parts shown in Fig. 5.

Fig. 8 is a view of a modification of my invention in which the mirror pivots into a depression formed in the chair.

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 8 with the mirror swung upwardly into viewing position. I

Fig. 10 is a sectional view of the modfication of Fig. 9 showing the means whereby the mirror effects the locking of the chair seat and the chair back relatively to the chair base.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, and especially Figs. 1, 5 and 6, reference numeral 10 indicates the chair base of my invention supported by a series of legs 11, the legs to be secured to the base in any conventional way or as shown in my earlier patent. Base 10 has a bearing 12 in which rotates the pin 13 carrying a plate 14 supporting an upholstered seat 15. It is obvious that the seat 15 will rotate freely relatively to the base 10 unless held against rotation by means to be hereinafter set forth.

Base 10 has a further bearing 16 in which is mounted for rotation a pin 17. Mounted for rotation on the axis of the pin 17 is a frame member 18 forming the back and mirror support of my invention. Frame member 18 has bolted thereto a bracket 19 extending upwardly to a point above the upper surface of the base 10. Rollers 20 are carried by the bracket 19, these rollers restingon the upper surface of the base 10 to support he frame member 18 for rotation relatively to the base 10 on the pivot shaft 17.

Suitably secured to the frame member 18 is a camming member 21, best shown in Figs. 5 and 6, this camming member being cooperable with a camming pin 22 exending downwardly from the plate 14 forming the support for the upholstered seat 15. It is quite obvious that as the seat rotates about the axis of pin 13, camming pin 22 will contact the vertical sides of the cam 21 to rotate the frame member 18 about the pivot shaft 17. The structure so far set forth is very similar to that described in my earlier patent to which I have alluded.

Referring now to Fig. 7 I show a latchbolt 26 that is adapted to lock the frame 18 to the base 16. For this purpose the latchbolt 26 slides in guide bores 27 and 28 formed in the bracket 19 and is adapted to enter an opening 29 in a camming strike 30 carried by the base 10 when the opening 29 is positioned opposite the latchbolt 26.

Latchbolt 26 is pressed by a spring 31 relatively to an L-shaped slide member 32, this L-shaped slide member 32 being mounted through pins 33 for sliding movement on the frame member 18. A spring 34 normally tends to hold the L-shaped member 32 in a position to the left of that position illustrated in Figs. 5 and 7, and in that position the latchbolt 26 will naturally be out of the bore 29 of the strike 30. On the left end of the L-shaped member 32 there is a camming lip 35, and this camming lip is shown contacted by a camming lug 36 in Figs. 5 and 7. When the camming lug 36 strikes the camming lip the L-shaped member 32 is forced into its position of Figs. 5 and 7, carrying with it the latchbolt 26. If, in the particular position of the L-shaped member 32 the latchbolt 26 does not encounter the opening 29 in the strike 30, the

' latchbol will be depressed agains the pressure of spring 31 in readiness to move into the opening 29 when that opening moves into alignment with the latchbolt 26, all as will be clearly apparent.

I shall now describe the manner in which the camniing lug 36 is actuated for controlling the operation of the latchbolt 26. Camming lug 36, as best seen in Fig. 4, is secured to a pair of rods 49 through a plate 41, these rods being in turn secured through clips 42, best shown in Fig. 5, to the back 43 of a mirror 45. Rodsll are suitably supported on hearing rings 50 (Fig. 3) for sliding relatively to a panel 44 forming part of the back of the chair, this panel being itself secured to an extension 18a forming an integral part of the frame 18. The panel 44 is formed with a depression that coacts with a depression in a cover panel 46, to form an internal compartment within which is housed the mirror 45. Panel 46 is pivoted to panel 44 through hinges 47 best shown in Fig. 4, and the two panels are normally in their closed position illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 with the mirror resting in this internal compartment formed between the panels. It will be appreciated that in this relationship of the parts, the mirror is completely enclosed within the back of the chair and cannot be seen, so that the chair presents the usual appearance of a conventional chair, all as clearly shown in Fig. 1.

For maintaining the panel 46 securely against the panel 44, I utilize a spring 48 best illustrated in Fig. 5, it being obvious that the panel 46 may be moved to its open position of Fig. 5 against the pressure of the spring 48 whenever it is desired to do so. This opening movement may be limited by suitable means. Upon this movement of the panel 46 to open position, a handle 49, forming an extension of the rods 40, may be readily manipulated so as to move the rods from the position of Figs. 1, 2 and 5 to the position of Fig. 3, the rods for this movement being suitably guided by the guide rings 50 carried on the rear panel 44 of the chair back. If desired other means may be employed to mount the rods 40 for simple sliding motion.

Because the mirror 45 is relatively heavy, its weight and the weight of the rods may be counterbalanced by the use of a metal strap 55, best shown in Fig. 4. This metal strap is secured at 56 to one of the rods 49 and extends upwardly to a spring reel 57 maintained on the back panel 44 of the chair. The spring reel 57 is maintained stressed when themirror 45 is in its position of Fig. 4, thereby enabling the spring of the reel to assist, through its wind- 4 ing action, the upward movement of the mirror to the viewing position of Fig.- 3. Preferably, the forward panel 46 has a foam rubber pad 58 applied thereto as shown in Fig. 5 so that when the spring 48 moves the panel 46 to its closed position of Fig. 3 after the mirror 45 has been moved upwardly, the foam rubber pad 58 will help hold the mirror in its viewing position of Fig. 3. It will be appreciated further that when the mirror is in its lower position, the handle 49 will be exposed as shown in Fig. 2 but that this exposure will be at the back of the chair and will not affect greatly the appearance of the chair.

Reviewing now the operation of the parts, let us consider that the chair is in its condition of Fig. l. The carnming lug 36 will, therefore, be in the position of Fig. 4, and against the carnming lip 35 as shown in Figs. 5 and '7. This maintains the L-shaped member 32 in its position of Figs. 5 and 7 stressing the spring 34 and maintaining the latchbolt 26 in the opening 29 of the strike 30. This means that the back of the chair, formed by the coaction of the panels 44 and 46, and assembled to the part 18a forming a continuation of the frame 18, is locked to the base 10 against rotation relatively to that base. Therefore, the upholstered chair seat 15 will also be locked against rotation relatively to the base 10 because the pin 22 depending downwardly from the plate 14 is within the cam 21, and cannot move without moving the cam 21. Naturally, since cam 21 cannot move because it is fixed to frame 18, the upholstered seat 15 will not rotate on the axis of the shaft 13.

Let us consider that the forward panel 46 is now moved to the dash and dotted position of Fig. 5. This allows vertical movement of the mirror 45 with the rods 40 to the upper position of Fig. 3. This movement will bring the camming lug 36 away from its position of Figs. 4, 5 and 7. Immediately the spring 34 will pull the L shaped member 32 to the left from its position of Figs. 5 and 7 carrying the latchbolt 26 out of the opening 29 of the strike 30. It is obvious that the seat of my chair will now be free to rotate. It will also be free to rotate in a complementary manner, the frame 18 and the chair back carried by the said frame through pin 22 and cam 21. The upward movement of the mirror will be effected through the handle 49 with the assistance of the counterbalancing reel 57 and strap 55. With the mirror in its upper viewing position of Fig. 3, it will be held yieldingly in that position, not only by the reel 57, but by the pads 58 through the pressure of the spring 48 holding the forward panel 46 of the back of my chair against the rear panel 44.

Should it now be decided to use the chair in a conventional manner the forward panel 46 will be moved outwardly again to its position of Fig. 5 and the mirror will be moved downwardly to its position of Figs. 4 and 5 bringing the cam lug 36 against the cam lip 35 of the L shaped member 32. This will react against the spring 34 in a manner tending to force the latchbolt 26 out wardly. If the latchbolt is not in alignment with the bore 29 of the strike 30, the spring 31 will be compressed until the seat rotates to bring the bolt 26 into alignment with the strike 30 through rotation of the frame 18. At that time the latchbolt 26 will enter the bore 29 of the strike and the parts will be securely looked as is well illustrated in Figs. 5 and 7.

In the modification of Figs. 8 to 10, the mirror is designated by reference numeral 75 and is pivoted at 76 to the rear panel 77 of the back of my chair. When the mirror is in its position of Fig. 8, the back thereof designated by reference numeral 78, will be exposed and this back may be upholstered to match the front panel 79 of the back of my chair. Whenever desired, the mirror may be moved from its position of Fig. 8 to the position of Fig. 9 exposing its mirrored surface to the viewer for use. During such movement the end 80 of a Bowden wire will be released for movement outwardly under the influence of a spring 81 secured at 82 to the other end of the Bowden wire. This spring 81 not only moves the Bowden wire but also moves a bracket 32a that is exactly the same in function as the bracket 32 of the first modification.

It is, therefore, readily seen that when the mirror of the modification of Figs. 8 to 10 inclusive is moved in the direction of the arrow 85 in Fig. 10 from the position of Fig. 8 to the position of Fig. 9, spring 81 will, through the member 32a, effect the retraction of a latchbolt 26a in the same manner that the movement of the mirror in the first modification to viewing position eflects the retraction of the latchbolt 26.. When the mirror is moved from the position of Fig. 9 back to the position of Fig. 10, it will operate against the end 80 of the Bowden wire to move the Bowden wire against the force of spring 81 forcing the member 32a to effect the latching again of the bolt 26a in the same manner that the movement of the member 32 in Figs. and 7 by cam lug 36 effects the latching again of the latchbolt 26. Thus, in Figs. 8 to 10 I have substituted the utilization of a Bowden wire in the control mechanism, together with a different mirror mounting means, for effecting the locking and unlocking of the seat and back of the chair in the same general manner as set forth in my first modification.

I new claim:

1. In a combination of the class described, a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said base, a chair back, means mounting said chair back for rotation on said base, a mirror, means mounting said mirror on said chair back for movement relatively to said chair back, locking means for locking said chair back to said chair base to hold said chair back against rotation relatively to said chair base, and means actuated by movement of said mirror on its mounting means relatively to said chair back for moving said locking means between locking and unlocking positions.

2. In a combination of the class described, a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said base, a chair back, means mounting said chair back for rotation relatively to said base, a mirror, means mounting said mirror on said chair back for movement relatively thereto between a non- Viewing positionand a viewing position, locking means for locking and unlocking said chair back relatively to said chair base, and means actuated throughthe movement of said mirror 'on'its' mounting means relatively to said chair back tono'n-viewing position for effecting the operation of's'aid locking means to lock said chair back to said chair base, said means moving said locking means to release said chair back for movement relatively to said chair base when said mirror is moved to viewing position.

3. In a combination of the class described, a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said base, a back for said chair also rotatable on said base, a mirror, means mounting said mirror on said back for movement relatively thereto from a non-viewing position to a viewing position, locking means for locking said chair back against movement relatively to said chair base, and means whereby the movement of said mirror relatively to said back effects movement of said locking means to lock and unlock said chair back relatively to said chair base.

4. In a combination of the class described, a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said base, a chair back, means mounting said chair back for rotation on said base, a mirror, means mounting said mirror on said chair back for movement between a lower non-viewing position and an upper viewing position, locking means for said chair seat and back movable between a release position and a locking position in which said locking means lock said chair back and chair seat to said chair base, and means whereby the movement of said mirror on its mounting means relatively to said chair back actuates said locking means.

5. In a combination of the class described, a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said base, a back for said chair, a mirror, means mounting said mirror on said back for movement relatively thereto from a non-viewing position to a viewing position, locking means for said chair seat and chair back movable relatively thereto between locking and unlocking positions, and means of connection between said mirror and said locking means whereby the movement of said mirror relatively to said back efiects the movement of said locking means between said locking and unlocking positions to lock and unlock said chair back relatively to said chair base.

6. In a combination of the class described, a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said base, a back for said chair also rotatable on said base, means whereby said seat rotates said back, a mirror, means mounting said mirror on said back for movement relatively thereto from a nonviewing position to a viewing position, locking means for said chair back movable between locking and unlocking positions, and means actuated by movement of said mirror relatively to said back for effecting the movement of said locking means between said locking and unlocking positions to lock and unlock said chair back relatively to said chair base.

7. In a combination of the class described, relatively rotating parts comprising a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said base on a predetermined axis, and a back for said chair rotatable on said base in another axis, means whereby said seat imparts rotation to said back, a mirror, means mounting said mirror on said back for movement relatively thereto from a non-viewing position to a viewing position, locking means for locking said chair seat and chair back to said chair base, said locking means being movable between locking and unlocking positions, and means actuated by movement of said mirror relatively to said chair back for effecting the movement of said locking means between said locking and unlocking positions to lock and unlock said chair back relatively to said chair base.

8. In a combination of the class described, a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said chair base, a chair back, means mounting said chair back for rotation on said chair base on an axis spaced from the axis of rotation of said chair seat, a mirror, means mounting said mirror on said chair back for movement from an upper viewing position to a lower non-viewing position, means whereby rotation of said chair seat effects predetermined rotation of said chair back, a latchbolt carried by said means mounting said back for rotation, a strike on said base into which said latchbolt projects to lock said chair back and chair seat against rotation relatively to said base, and means whereby the movement of said mirror to viewing position effects the retraction of said latchbolt to release said seat and back for rotation while the movement of said mirror to non-viewing position conditions said latchbolt to lock said seat and back against relative rotation when said 7 strike and latchbolt are aligned.

9. In a combination of the class described, relatively movable parts comprising a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said chair base, a chair back, and means mounting said chair back for rotation relatively to. said chair base, a mirror, means mounting said mirror on said chair back for movement from a viewing position to a non-viewing positions, means whereby rotation of said chair seat effects rotation of said chair back, a latchbolt, a strike, means mounting said latchbolt and strike in opposed relation on two of said relatively movable parts so that entrance of said latchbolt into said strike locks said chair back and seat against rotation relatively to said chair base, and means whereby the movement of said mirror to viewing position effects the retraction of said latchbolt to release said back and seat for rotation while the movement of said mirror to non-viewing position conditions said latchbolt to lock said back and seat against rotation.

10. In a combination of the class described, relatively movable parts comprising a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said chair base, a chair back, and means mounting said chair back for rotation relatively to said chair base,

position to efiect retraction of the said latchbolt out of said strike.

11. In a combination of the class described, a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said chair base on a vertical axis, a chair back, said back having an internl compartment, a panel covering said internal compartment, means mounting said chair back for rotation relatively to said chair base on an axis spaced from the axis of rotation of said chair back and parallel thereto, a mirror, means mounting said mirror on said chair back within said internal compartment for movement from an upper viewing position out of said compartment to a lower non-viewing position within said compartment, said panel covering said compartment when said mirror is within said compartment and when said mirror is out of said compartment, means whereby rotation of said chair seat efiects rotation of said chair back, a latchbolt, a strike into which said latchbolt projects, means mounting said latchbolt and strike in opposed relation on two of said relatively rotatable elements whereby entrance of said latchbolt into said strike locks both said chair back and seat against rotation relatively to said base, and means whereby the movement of said mirror to viewing position effects the retraction of said latchbolt to release said seat and back for rotation while the movement of said mirror to nonviewing position conditions said latchbolt to lock said seat and back against relative rotation when said strike and latchbolt are aligned.

12. In a combination of the class described, a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said chair base on a vertical axis, a chair back, said back having an internal compartment, a panel covering said internal compartment, means mounting said chair back for rotation relatively to said chair base on an axis spaced from the axis of rotation of said chair back and parallel thereto, a mirror, means mounting said mirror on said chair back within said internal compartment for movement from an upper viewing position out of said compartment to a lower non-viewing position within said compartment, said panel covering said compartment when said mirror iswithin said compartment and when said mirror is out of said compartment, means whereby rotation of said chair seat efiects rotation of said chair back, a latchbolt, a strike into which said latchbolt projects, means mounting said latchbolt and strike in opposed relation on two of said relatively rotatable elements whereby entrance of said latchbolt into said strike locks said chair back against rotation relatively to said base, and means whereby the movement of said mirror to viewing position effects the retraction of said latchbolt to release said back for rotation while the movement of said mirror to non-viewing position conditions said latchbolt to lock said back against rotation when said strike and latchbolt are aligned.

13. In a combination of the class described, relatively movable parts comprising a chair base, a chair seat rotatable on said chair base on a vertical axis, a chair back, and means mounting said chair back for rotation relatively to said chair base on an axis spaced from the axis of rotation of said chair back and parallel thereto, a mirror, means pivotally mounting said mirror on said chair back for movement from an upper viewing position to a lower non-viewing position, means whereby rotation of said chair seat effects rotation of said chair back, a latchbolt, a strike into which said latchbolt projects, means mounting said latchbolt and strike in opposed re lation on two of said relatively movable parts so that entrance of said latchbolt into said strike locks said chair back against rotation relatively to said base, and a Bowden wire actuated incidental to the movement of said mirror to viewing position for effecting the retraction of said latchbolt to release said back for rotation while the movement of said mirror to non-viewing position conditions said latchbolt to lock said back against rotation when said strike and latchbolt are aligned.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,671,631 Fox Mar. 9,

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3131968 *Aug 8, 1961May 5, 1964Rene AltCombined hair dressing table and chair
US3619002 *May 1, 1970Nov 9, 1971Mckinney JayCombination toy and chair
US3802736 *Nov 9, 1972Apr 9, 1974Rick MDental instrument storage apparatus
US3806189 *Feb 20, 1973Apr 23, 1974Simjian LChair with moving seat and mirror
US3818668 *Aug 24, 1972Jun 25, 1974Charniga JSiding mounting strip
US3905642 *Dec 23, 1974Sep 16, 1975Luther G SimjianChair with moving seat and mirror
US4557520 *Sep 18, 1984Dec 10, 1985Command Automation, Inc.Chair with moving seat and moving mirror
US7600879 *Jul 24, 2008Oct 13, 2009Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Motor vehicle with a rear seat viewing system
DE1267810B *Jan 31, 1961May 9, 1968Rene AltWahlweise als normaler Stuhl oder als Toilettenstuhl mit Spiegel verwendbares Moebel
Classifications
U.S. Classification359/881, 297/185, 297/188.4
International ClassificationA47C1/022, A47C7/62, A47C1/023
Cooperative ClassificationA47C7/62, A47C1/023
European ClassificationA47C7/62, A47C1/023