Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2811154 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1957
Filing dateJul 20, 1953
Priority dateJul 20, 1953
Publication numberUS 2811154 A, US 2811154A, US-A-2811154, US2811154 A, US2811154A
InventorsWilliam M Scholl
Original AssigneeWilliam M Scholl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stretchable bandage
US 2811154 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 29, 1957 United States Patent STRETCHABLE BANDAGE William M. Scholl, Chicago, Ill.

Application July 20, 1953, Serial No. 368,910

3 Claims. (Cl. 128-156) This invention relates to improvements in a stretchable bandage, and more particularly to a surgical or medical bandage highly desirable for application to various parts of the human body for the treatment of circulatory conditions such as varicose veins, varicosities, varicose ulcers, and may satisfactorily be used in case of injuries to joints, such as knee, ankles, wrists, elbows, shoulders, or around the torso, for sprains and similar afllictions, as well as for brassieres and other garments which tend to bind and support portions of the body, and other and various purposes where tension in a bandage or garment is desirable, as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

The instant application is a continuation-in-part of and supersedes my application entitled stretchable Bandage, filed September 1, 1949, Serial No. 113,553, now abandoned.

In the past, many and various types of surgical bandages, dressings and the like have been provided, many of which were of an allegedly stretchable and durable character. Difiiculty has been experienced, however, in both acquiring and maintaining proper tension of the bandage around the particular affliction or injury, and bandages heretofore utilized were subject to overstretching, loss of elasticity, and in most cases slipping out of place.

Surgical bandages heretofore used were also frequently diflicult to apply and maintain, especially over a joint, while permitting flexing of the joint, with each lap of the bandage staying in the position originally intended. Again, difficulty has been experienced with stretchable bandages heretofore used in that after becoming contaminated externally or internally from exudation from the skin or an afiliction, they could not be properly cleansed and restored to original condition.

With the foregoing in mind, it is an important object of the instant invention to provide a simple form of stretchable bandage having exceedingly long life, and which may be applied to provide the desired tension over .any particular affliction or injury on the body of the user, and the bandage will remain in proper location.

A further object of the invention is to provide a stretchable surgical bandage that will readily conform to particular parts of the body to be bandaged so as to maintain a constant and steady tension, the same tension originally applied when dressing the injury.

A'further feature of the invention resides in the provision of a stretchable bandage of a character designed to maintain constant tension throughout its use, and which is substantially of a non-slipping character when applied to the human body.

Another feature of the invention resides in the provision of a stretchable bandage in which at least the body contacting portion of the bandage is absorbent, and yet may readily be cleansed when necessary.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a surgical stretchable bandage which is ventilative in character when applied to the body.

Also a feature of the invention is the provision of a surgical bandage of a laminated type, comprising a stretchable fabric and a sheet of cellular latex, in which the fabric limits the stretching of the more delicate and more Patented Oct. 29, 1957 2 elastic latex to a safe amount, and prevents the latex from exerting uncomfortable or excess binding of the patients body. 7

Still another object of the invention resides in the provision of a stretchable surgical bandage comprising a fabric sheet and asheet of foam latex secured to one face of the fabric sheet, the foam latex being of the intercommunicative cellular variety.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a new and novel method of making a surgical bandage,

While some of the more salient features, characteristics and advantages of the instant invention have been above pointed out, others will become apparent from the following disclosures, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a fragmentary, somewhat diagrammatic view illustrating the application of a bandage embodying principles of the instant invention over an elbow joint;

Figure 2 is also a fragmentary, somewhat diagrammatic view illustrating the same bandage as applied over a calf of a leg, in the manner it would be used in the case of varicose veins;

Figure 3 is a greatly enlarged transverse sectional view through one form of, the bandage;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary highly magnified view of the fabric forming a part of the bandage, showing the same in its contracted state;

Figure 5 is also a highly magnified view of the fabric, showing the same in its stretched or expanded state;

Figure 6 is a fragmentary somewhat diagrammatic view, with parts shown in vertical section, illustiratinga band age of slightly different construction, and the method of making the same; and

Figure 7 is a greatly magnified cross sectional view of the bandage of Fig. 3.

As shown on the drawings:

While the instant invention may be made in various shapes and sizes, it will be herein described in the form of an elongated strip which may be packed either in roll form, or in folded form, the roll being perhaps easier for application to the body. The bandage may be directly applied to substantially any portion of the human body. To this end I have illustrated in Fig. 1 a bandage 1 applied over the elbow joint of a human arm 2 in ordinary straight wrap-around formation, with some overlap .between adjacent layers of the bandage. When so applied, the bandage not only maintains desired and constant tension over the elbow joint and adjacent parts, but permits free flexing of the joint, and yet thelayers .of the bandage Will not slip relatively to each other, nor will the bandage slip relatively to the arm or joint.

By Way of another example of the use of the invention, 1 have shown the same bandage similarly applied around the calf of a leg 3, .in Fig. 2. When applied in this location, the bandage will conform readily to the contour of the leg, adhering to the thinner portions as well as to the calf bulge. In this location, the bandage is highly beneficial in the treatment of varicose veins and related afilictions.

Obviously, the bandage may equally as well be applied to many and various locations on the human body.

With reference now to Fig. 3, it will be seen that the first form of bandage comprises a laminated structure including a fabric 4, a cellular rubber layer 5, and these two layers are cemented together as indicated at 6.

Now with reference to Figs. 4 and 5 it will be seen that the fabric sheet ,4 includes a series of relatively heavy transverse strands or threads 7, and a series of finer threads or strands 8 interwoven with the strands 7. The finer strands 8 are cable-like in character and preferably comprise a relatively tightly twisted thread, so that after weaving the normal position of these twisted threads are as seen in Fig. 4 when the fabric sheet is in the contracted condition. When the fabric sheet is stretched, as indicated in Fig. 5, the twisted strands are taken out of their curvate position and brought into substantially parallel relationship, thus permitting a separation of the transverse threads 6 and the resultant stretching of the fabric. However, due to the twisted character of the finer strands 8, when tension is released, these strands will inherently tend to assume their original position as seen in Fig. 4, and thus provide the contracting power for the fabric layer. Obviously, as soon as the strands 8 are brought into substantially parallel relationship as seen in Fig. 5, the fabric has reached its limit of stretchability.

The cellular rubber layer 5 is preferably foam latex of the type having intercommunicating cells. This foam latex layer may be as thick as deemed desirable, and in nearly every case will be noticeably thicker than the fabric, but otherwise will have the same overall dimensions as the fabric, in the contracted state. With the cells of the foam latex intercommunicating, the structure is rendered ventilative in character, since air may pass deviously through the cells, and through the rather open weave fabric, particularly when the fabric is stretched.

The foam latex layer 5 is united with the fabric layer 4, as above explained, by cementitious material 6. This cementitious material is also stretchable, and water resistant so that the bandage may be readily laundered when desired. The cementitious material is also not applied so as to preclude the passage of air through the latex layer and the fabric layer. To this end, the cementitious material may be applied in a manner to leave numerous fine apertures therein. Preferably the material 6 is a natural latex compound.

The foam latex layer 5 is, of course, naturally stretchable and has a natural contracting power. It is more delicate and more stretchable than the fabric 4. Consequently, when the entire bandage is stretched, the fabric limits the stretching of the more delicate foam latex layer to a safe amount, so that the layer will not be disrupted by overstretching, and also prevents the latex layer from exerting uncomfortable excess binding on the patients body. At the same time, the fabric layer does not rely upon the latex layer for contraction, and does not rob the latex layer of any of its inherent contracting power, because the fabric, as explained above, has the ability to contract itself.

The two layers, fabrics and foam latex, are preferably united when in their relaxed or contracted conditions. This provides the bandage with a smooth unwrinkled appearance at all times and prevents a wrinkled condition developing when the bandage is ap lied to the body, so that the bandage will always fit the body firmly and smoothly.

When the bandage is applied the foam latex sheet 5 is preferably in direct contact with the skin of the body and during application the bandage is given the desired degree 'of stretch or tension around the body. The foam latex provides a soft gentle contact with the skin of the user, is absorbent of exudations from the body or an injury, and yet grips the body with a delicate and gentle friction that prevents any portion of the bandage slipping out of place after once being applied. If the bandage is applied over a joint, obviously free flexing of that joint is permitted. If the bandage is applied directly over an injury, that injury is properly cushioned. Whenever the'bandage becomes soiled, either externally or internally, that is, on either surface, the entire bandage may be readily and thoroughly laundered. It is not essential that the bandage be applied in the illustrated overlapping, wrap-around style, but the bandage may be used quite as readily in a figure 8 style over the ankle or in various manners and locations as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

In Fig. 6 I have illustrated a method of makinga bandage of slightly different construction, in that the cemen- 4 titious compound 6 is omitted. In this arrangement, the fabric layer 4 is placed upon a conveyor belt 9 which may pass over a pulley 10, and then flatly over a backing member 11. Opposite the backing member, a mass of whipped or aerated foam latex 12 is placed on the fabric, and then the fabric and a portion of the latex pass under a doctor blade 13 or the equivalent which is adjusted to the desired thickness of the foam latex layer 5. The two layers then pass through any suitable form of heating device or oven, diagrammatically indicated at 14, wherein the foam latex layer is vulcanized or equivalently secured to the fabric layer. During this process, the temperature is rather rigidly controlled, although the desired temperature varies, depending upon the thickness and density of the foam latex layer, and usually ranges between 200 and 300 F.

In Fig. 7 I have illustrated a greatly magnified cross sectional view of the structure of Fig. 3, but it is to be understood that insofar as the fabric and latex layer is concerned, this figure applies equally as well to the structure of Fig. 6. In this showing I have endeavored to indicate that the cells in the foam latex layer 5 are intercommunicative, which not only permits ventilation of the injured part of the body after application of the bandage, but also renders the bandage itself more absorbing.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that I have provided a highly satisfactory form of surgical bandage capable of maintaining constant tension during use, which permits flexing of joints when applied thereover, which intimately fits other portions of the body, which is substantially nonslipping in character, and which is extremely light in weight. Further, the bandage is long lived, may be laundered when desired, repeatedly used, and is economical to manufacture.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

:1 claim as my invention:

1. In a stretchable bandage, an elongated strip of woven fabric material stretchable lengthwise only and possessing inherent contracting power, and a sheet of foam latex having intercommunicating cells secured to a face of said fabric strip, the fabric strip being less stretchable and stronger than the foam latex strip to limit the stretch that may be applied to the foam latex strip to a safe amount to prevent disruption of the latex strip and undue binding of the latex strip on the body of a user.

2. In a stretchable bandage, an elongated strip of woven fabric material stretchable lengthwise only and possessing inherent contracting power, a sheet of foam latex having intercommunicating cells secured to a face of said fabric strip, the fabric strip being less stretchable and stronger than the foam latex strip to limit the stretch that may be applied to the foam latex strip to a safe amount to prevent disruption of the latex strip and undue binding of the latex strip on the body of a user, said fabric strip being open and porous especially when under tension to render the bandage ventilative in character, and said latex strip being absorbent.

3. In a stretchable bandage, an elongated strip of woven fabric material stretchable lengthwise only and possessing inherent contracting power, and a sheet of foam latex having intercommunicating cells secured to a face of said fabric strip, the fabric strip being less stretchable and stronger than the foam, latex strip to limit the stretch that may be applied to the foam latex strip to a safe amount to prevent disruption of the latex strip and undue binding of the latex strip on the body of a user, said fabric and latex strip being secured together by a stretchable and waterproof adhesive.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2140026 *Sep 26, 1935Dec 13, 1938Dunlop Rubber CoCellular rubber and method of making the same
US2649391 *Apr 15, 1950Aug 18, 1953Edward D AndrewsSponge rubber product
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3063446 *Jan 20, 1960Nov 13, 1962Scholl Mfg Co IncTraction bunion corrector
US3122140 *Mar 29, 1962Feb 25, 1964Johnson & JohnsonFlexible absorbent sheet
US3122141 *Mar 29, 1962Feb 25, 1964Johnson & JohnsonFlexible absorbent sheet
US3122142 *May 27, 1963Feb 25, 1964Johnson & JohnsonAbsorbent product
US3505259 *Aug 8, 1967Apr 7, 1970Union Oil CoComposition and process for reclaiming blends of wax and ethylene vinyl acetate copolymers
US3613681 *Sep 10, 1969Oct 19, 1971Adams Joe RTherapeutic aid
US4653492 *Feb 13, 1985Mar 31, 1987Dorothy ParsonsElastic bandage
US4905692 *Nov 5, 1987Mar 6, 1990K. T. Medical, Inc.Medical and orthopedic support fabric
US5762623 *Jun 30, 1997Jun 9, 1998Andover Coated Products, Inc.Elastic bandage
US6156424 *Oct 31, 1997Dec 5, 2000Andover Coated Products, Inc.Cohesive products
US6478761 *Aug 19, 1999Nov 12, 2002Violeta Bracamonte-SommerRollable body part protector
US6520926Feb 24, 1999Feb 18, 2003Lohmann Rauscher, Inc.Compression support sleeve
US6524264 *Oct 5, 2000Feb 25, 2003Ethel HutchinsonFront and back brace with contact separation cover
US6575926Dec 15, 2000Jun 10, 2003Bonutti 2003 Trust-AMyofascial strap
US6958048May 16, 2003Oct 25, 2005Bonutti Ip. LlcMyofascial strap
US7025738Nov 14, 2002Apr 11, 2006Lohmann RauscherCompression support sleeve
US7473816May 18, 2004Jan 6, 2009Lohmann & Rauscher, Inc.Multilayer moisture management fabric
US7497864 *Apr 30, 2003Mar 3, 2009Marctec, Llc.Tissue fastener and methods for using same
US7955285Jan 20, 2004Jun 7, 2011Bonutti Research Inc.Shoulder orthosis
US7981067Nov 17, 2008Jul 19, 2011Bonutti Research Inc.Range of motion device
US8012108Aug 12, 2005Sep 6, 2011Bonutti Research, Inc.Range of motion system and method
US8038637Jul 29, 2008Oct 18, 2011Bonutti Research, Inc.Finger orthosis
US8062241Oct 12, 2005Nov 22, 2011Bonutti Research IncMyofascial strap
US8066656Oct 28, 2005Nov 29, 2011Bonutti Research, Inc.Range of motion device
US8251934Dec 10, 2007Aug 28, 2012Bonutti Research, Inc.Orthosis and method for cervical mobilization
US8273043Jul 25, 2008Sep 25, 2012Bonutti Research, Inc.Orthosis apparatus and method of using an orthosis apparatus
US8784343Jul 29, 2011Jul 22, 2014Bonutti Research, Inc.Range of motion system
US8905950Feb 24, 2009Dec 9, 2014Bonutti Research, Inc.Shoulder ROM orthosis
US8920346Feb 5, 2008Dec 30, 2014Bonutti Research Inc.Knee orthosis
DE1098164B *Jul 12, 1958Jan 26, 1961Marino BertoliniZur Herstellung eines Gipsverbandes geeignete Bandage
WO1985003091A1 *Jan 9, 1985Jul 18, 1985Marcos A MoreMedical and orthopedic support fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/77, 602/76, 602/62
International ClassificationA61F13/00, A61F13/06, A61F13/15
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2013/00863, A61F2013/00102, A61F2013/00119, A61F13/00038, A61F2013/530802, A61F13/06, A61F2013/53445, A61F2013/00255, A61F13/10, A61F2013/530007
European ClassificationA61F13/00, A61F13/06