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Publication numberUS2811761 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 5, 1957
Filing dateNov 4, 1954
Priority dateNov 4, 1954
Publication numberUS 2811761 A, US 2811761A, US-A-2811761, US2811761 A, US2811761A
InventorsBauer Alfred F
Original AssigneeNat Lead Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Split dies provided with cooling means
US 2811761 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 5, 1957 A. F. BAUER SPLIT DIES PROVIDED WITH COOLING MEANS Filed NOV- 4, 1954 AGENT United States Patent SPLIT DIES PROVIDED WITH COOLING MEANS Alfred F. Bauer, Toledo, Ohio, assignor to National Lead glompany, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New ersey Application November 4, 1954, Serial No. 466,901

2 Claims. (Cl. 22-203) This invention relates to means for cooling dies. More specifically, it relates to a novel construction for the indirect cooling of large die surfaces.

In the die casting art it is recognized that difliculties are likely to be encountered in removing heat from the dies used in the casting operation. In order to obtain efficient and economical operation of die casting apparatus it is necessary that the heat derived from the molten metal be carried away from the cast piece and also away from the die itself at a rapid rate. It is known to provide passages in the die bodies and to directly pass cooling fluids through said passages. The die steel, however, has been subject to shock caused by the direct'contact of cooling fluids such as water. The effect of such shock is to create fatigue cracks and spalling which obviously greatly reduce the useful life of the die steel. Moreover, when a crack occurs which extends to the inside or casting surface of the die member, the die must be discarded since leakage of the cooling fluid into the interior of the die section obviously would make the casting operation impossible.

An object of the instant invention, therefore, is to provide a novel die construction which provides for indirect cooling of the die steel. Another object is to provide a die construction having means for conducting cooling fluids therethrough. Another object is to provide a die construction which will give long life and which will permit utilization of the die even though cracks do occur in the casting surface of the die itself. These and other objects will become apparent from the following more complete description of the invention and from the drawings.

Broadly, this invention is directed to a die construction comprising a die member having an inner face which possesses configuration of the article to be cast, and an outer surface, a passage cut through said outer surface, a conducting member positioned in said passage, at least part of the external shape of said conducting member possessing similar configuration to said passage and being directly bonded thereto, and a filler member portion present in that part of the passage not occupied by said conducting member.

Fig. 1, Fig. 2 and Fig. 3 are presented in order to more clearly show the details of construction of the instant invention. Fig. 1 is a schematic representation of a typical die construction according to this invention.

Fig. 2 is a cut-away portion of the upper section of a typical split die construction along line 22 of Fig. l, and shows in greater detail the central elements of the conducting portion of the die construction.

Fig. 3 shows that section along lines 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Considering now Fig. 1, there is shown a typical die construction 10. According to this invention the die itself is split into two sections 12 and 14 and is generally split along line 16. The face 13 of the die possesses at least part of the configuration of the article to be cast. Obviously at least one other die would be necessary to form the complete die. A passage 18 is provided in ice section 12 and opens generally along the splitting line 16. A conducting member 20 is positioned in passage 18 and generally makes contact with the wall surface of the passage. This construction is shown in more detail in Fig. 2. Outlet passage 22 is provided in the other section of the split die so as to permit an extension of the conducting member 20 to pass therethrough and permit inlet and outlet means such as shown generally at 24.

In Fig. 3 the conducting member 20 is shown having an inner face 26 and an outer surface 28. The generally hollow construction of the conducting member permits the transfer and flow of fluid media whereby cooling of the die member may be accomplished. Obviously the instant construction could also be employed to heat the die construction if such were desirable. The outer surface 28 of the conducting tube at least partially conforms to the contour 30 of the passage 18 and is positioned closely thereto. That portion of the passage which is not occupied by the conducting tube 20 is filled with appropriate filler metal 32.

According to the instant invention a passage is cut into the die steel at the selected distance from the die surface. This groove can be regular or irregular in its plane View, but would by necessity have to approximate the shape of at least part of the cooling tube. The tube material may be of any suitable material of construction as commonly employed for conducting heat. Copper or various alloys could be used for this purpose.

The method of applying the tube is as follows: First, the groove is definitely patterned so that a channel can be milled or cut into the one die portion. This channel would be accurate in its cross section contour to accommodate the prescribed tube. After milling and polishing the channel, so cut in the steel die outer surface, the interior of the channel is tinned. This tinning can be done with any suitable alloy that will wet the surface. In the instant case a soft solder medium was suitably employed. Likewise, the external surface of the tube after it has been formed to fit into the cut channel is tinned with the same tinning medium as the steel. The tube is then positioned into the channel. This may conveniently be done with a hammer using a wood block to be sure that the contact between the two tinned surfaces is as complete as possible. Next the entire unit, both the die steel and the copper tube in its position, is heated. This heating actually melts the two tinned media and by capillary action the parts solder together. This bond is not considered complete. An alloy is poured into the void area around the tube so that the dies channel is completely filled. The excess is machined olf flush with the mating surfaces of the two die casting die portions. In one instance the filler used was a zinc alloy; however, it is conceivable that any heat conducting alloy could be used for this purpose.

Substantially any fluid having heat transfer properties may be employed as a cooling medium. Because it is readily available and easily handled, it is preferred to use water for this job. However, it is to be recognized that many other fluids could be satisfactorily employed.

There are likewise many bonding and filler materials which could be employed, according to the instant invention. It is necessary that the bonding material be compatible with the material of which the die is constructed and also the material of which the cooling tube is constructed. Obviously materials of construction should be employed which do not melt at the temperatures which the die members normally reach when in use.

By the foregoing description and drawings there has been described a novel die construction which can be successfully employed particularly in the production of large size castings. The life of dies constructed according to the invention is substantially greater than those previously employed in the past and it has been found possible to continue using dies of this type for substantial periods of time even after cracks may have formed which extend to the casting surface itself.

While this invention has been described and illustrated by the foregoing description and drawings, it is not intended to be strictly limited thereto and other modifications and variations may be employed within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A split die of the class herein described comprising two members of substantial thickness, said members being united and in contact throughout their substantial entirety along a pair of matching interior faces and having casting faces possessing the general configuration of an article to be cast, the matching face of one section having a passage cut therethrough, a tubular member positioned in said passage, part of the external shape of said tubular member conforming to the contour of said passage and being directly bonded thereto, and a filler metal present in that part of the passage not occupied by said tubular member.

2. A split die of the class herein described comprising two members of substantial thickness, an upper member and a lower member, said members being united and in contact throughout their substantial entirety along a pair of matching interior faces and having casting faces possessing the general configuration of an article to be cast, the matching face of said upper member having a passage cut therethrough, a tubular member positioned in said passage, part of the external shape of said tubular member conforming to the contour of said passage and being directly bonded thereto, a filler metal being present in that part of the passage not occupied by said tubular member, the lower member having a passage out therethrough for the insertion of inlet and outlet tubes.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 141,442 Kingsford Aug. 5, 1873 1,245,674 Bushnell Nov. 6, 1917 1,473,827 Mills Nov. 13, 1923 1,712,386 I-Iarney May 7, 1929 1,769,009 Adams July 1, 1930 1,841,762 Samesreuther et al. Jan. 19, 1932

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US141442 *Jul 15, 1873Aug 5, 1873 Improvement in apparatus for the manufacture of starch
US1245674 *May 13, 1916Nov 6, 1917Oscar P BushnellSteam-plate.
US1473827 *Apr 4, 1918Nov 13, 1923 Chester b
US1712386 *Apr 19, 1928May 7, 1929Upson CoHeat-transmitting platen element
US1769009 *Jan 26, 1928Jul 1, 1930Troy Laundry Machinery CompanyLaundry ironing and pressing apparatus
US1841762 *Jun 20, 1927Jan 19, 1932 gebmahy
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3267997 *Sep 20, 1962Aug 23, 1966Aero Chatillon CorpFluid cooled washer
US4156582 *Dec 13, 1976May 29, 1979General Electric CompanyLiquid cooled gas turbine buckets
US4185369 *Mar 22, 1978Jan 29, 1980General Electric CompanyMethod of manufacture of cooled turbine or compressor buckets
US5023043 *Nov 10, 1988Jun 11, 1991Max-Planck-Gesellschaft Zur Forderung Der Wissenschaften E.V.Actively cooled device
US5111873 *Apr 16, 1991May 12, 1992General Motors CorporationDie casting frame
US8108982Jul 19, 2007Feb 7, 2012Floodcooling Technologies, L.L.C.Compound mold tooling for controlled heat transfer
US20100181017 *Sep 25, 2007Jul 22, 2010Toray Industries, Inc.Forming-molding tool and process for producing preforms and fiber reinforced plastics with the tool
EP0953392A1 *Feb 26, 1999Nov 3, 1999Bodycote IMT Industrial Materials Technologie GmbHProcess for making permanent moulds
EP1838468A2 *Dec 16, 2005Oct 3, 2007FloodCooling Technologies, L.L.C.A tool having enhanced cooling characteristics and a method for producing a tool having enhanced cooling characteristics
WO1981001972A1 *Jan 7, 1980Jul 23, 1981Selly Oak Diecasting LtdManufacture of dies for pressure casting
Classifications
U.S. Classification164/348, 165/168
International ClassificationB22C9/06
Cooperative ClassificationB22C9/065
European ClassificationB22C9/06D