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Publication numberUS2811905 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 5, 1957
Filing dateFeb 29, 1956
Priority dateFeb 29, 1956
Publication numberUS 2811905 A, US 2811905A, US-A-2811905, US2811905 A, US2811905A
InventorsJr George H Kennedy
Original AssigneeUs Envelope Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Envelope manufacture
US 2811905 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 5, 1957 e. H. KENNEDY, JR 2,811,995

ENVELUPE MANUFACTURE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 29, 1956 INVENTOR. George HKennedy Jr.

G. H. KENNEDY, JR 2,811,905

ENVELOPE MANUFACTURE Nov. 5, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 29. 1956 INVENTOR. GEORGE H. KENNEDY Jr.

Z/M J. M

United States Patent 2,811,905 ENVELOPE MANUFACTURE Application February 29, 1956, Serial No. 568,493 12 Claims. (Cl. 93-452) This invention, like the invention set forth in Vincent E. Heywood application Serial No. 375,091, filed August 19, 1953 (now abandoned), for Manufacture of Envelopes and its continuation-impart, Serial No. 670,981, filed July 10, 1957), relates to methods and mechanisms for obtaining extremely high rates of production, in the rotary machine manufacture of envelopes.

In envelope manufacture by the sequences and arrangements of the aforesaid Heywood applications, extremely high rates of envelope production can be achieved. Actually, the envelope production rate, under such sequences and arrangements, is limited only by the speed at which it is practicable and feasible to perform on the successive envelope blanks in process the two flap folding operations which are essential to their conversion into envelopes. These flap folding operations, for each blank, are an initial infolding of its side flaps, and a subsequent folding over of its back or bottom flap into adhesive seam connection with its side fiaps.

That is to say, with the invention of the aforesaid copending Heywood applications, the rate of envelope production suffers no limitation or curtailment whatsoever, from the operations of applying to the successive blanks (l) the glue for sticking the envelope seams, and/ or (2) the seal flap glue or gumming. This is because of the fact that the gluing is applied, progressively and en masse, to seal flap margins as well as to seal flap margins of the successive blanks, with the latter collected, for each glue applying operation, in a slow speed closely shingled or stepped assembly that exposes only the desired glue-receiving flap margins to the action of the gluing roller or wiper.

One difliculty or drawback however, with these procedures of the aforesaid copending applications, is the need for the closely shingled blanks, once their leading back flap margins have received the seam sticking glue, to be completely de-shingled or individualized, and then to undergo a second shingling operation, in opposite relation to the first, before their trailing seal flap margins can be coated with glue.

The instant invention overcomes this difficulty or drawback, by a sequence of operations which, in achieving an envelope production rate nearly as high as the aforesaid procedures, requires only a single shingling operation to be performed on the blanks.

Other and further objects and advantages of this in vention will be made apparent by the following detailed description thereof, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. l is a plan view, illustrating schematically the envelope making method and apparatus of this invention, but omitting, for the sake of clearness, certain glue receptacles and glue transfer rolls.

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view on the center line 2-2 of Fig. l, and showing also the elements omitted from Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a large scale view of one of the envelopes Patented Nov. 5, 1957 "ice by this invention, from blanks of the form end of Fig. 1.

produced shown at the right-hand Fig. 4 is a large scale fragmentary diagrammatic view, as seen from the underside of Fig. 1, showing how the blanks in process undergo partial deshingling from a closely shingled relation to a shallowly shingled relation.

This invention achieves extremely high rates of production, in the manufacture of triangular flap" or diagonal seam envelopes, from blanks of any conventional shape, such as shown in Fig. l by the blanks A, A. Each blank A, as shown, consists of the usual rectangular body portion 1, having opposite triangular side flaps 2, 2, a deep triangular back flap 3 and a shallow seal or closure flap 4. It is contemplated that a succession of these or other appropriately-shaped blanks will be fed fiatwise one by one at high speed, either from a supply stack (not shown) or, in the case of blanks of substantially diamond or rhombic shape, from suitable oblique cutoff devices operable on a traveling paper web to sever successive blanks therefrom. In either case the successive blanks. such as A, A, by the action of suitable feed rolls or the like (not shown except at 5, 5 Figs. 1 and 2) are advanced rapidly, from right to left, in spaced apart relation, toward the illustrated mechanism, each with its back flap 3 leading and its seal flap 4 trailing; preferably each flat blank A, during its initial high speed advance, receives lines of scoring 20 at the base of each side flap, and a line of scoring 3a at the base of its back flap 3.

The initial operation here, the same as in the aforesaid copending Heywood application. is to fold inwardly the side flaps 2, 2 of the successive advancing spaced-apart blanks A, A. For this purpose, the illustrated mechanism, in the path of said rapidly advancing spaced blanks, provides conventional plowshare folding devices 6, 6 (shown only in Pig. 1) equipped with the usual high speed forwarding rolls 7, 7 and with suitable traction rolls 7', 7-these sets of rolls 7, 7' cooperating to continue each blanks advance at the same high speed as that imparted by the feed rolls 5, 5. The plowshare" folders 6, 6 operate in the usual and well-known manner to obtain, by each blanks movement therethrough, the progressive turning, inwardly and downwardly, on score lines 2a, 2a, of its side flaps 2, 2 against its body portion 1, to give the blank the opposite parallel side edge folds 8, 8 as shown by the blank marked B in Fig. l.

The next operation on the successive partly-folded blanks B, B is to progressively collect them, one after another, in a deep shingled slow speed assembly, as shown at D, Fig. 1, for the progressive en masse gumming of their trailing seal flap margins. To this end, the mechanism provides, beyond the plowshare folders 6, 6, suitable high-speed rolls 9, 9 operating at the same high peripheral speed as the preceding rolls 5, 5 and 7, 7'. Said rolls 9, 9 are appropriately relieved, as shown at 10, 10, Fig. 2, so as to release each blank B and to discontinue its high'speed advance, substantially at the instant that back flap areas 12, 12 just ahead of its side edge folds 8, 8 encounter and are seized by a suitable low speed blank forwarding means, here shown as consisting of a lower roll 11 and a cooperating pair of upper narrow rolls or discs 11', 11' the latter engaging the successive blanks B only along zones adjacent to their side edge folds 8, 8. These slow speed rolls 11, 11 as a unit are made adjustable toward and away (see arrows X, Fig. 2) from the high-speed rolls 9, 9, to accommodate the spacing to blanks or greater or less dimension, measured in the direction of their travel through the mechanism.

Rolls 11, 11 have a peripheral speed which is only a very small fraction (here with blanks A, A about onesixteenth) of the peripheral speed of the preceding rolls 9, 9. Thus each partly-folded blank B as it encounters the rolls 11, 11' has its speed of advance so drastically almost entirely overtaken "by the "next is slowed down by the rolls 11, 11. In this overtaking or shingling action, provision is made for each fast moving blank B to be projected beneath the trailing seal flap 4 of the preceding slowed down blank, by disposing the bite of the slow rolls 11, 11' at a slightly higher level than the bite of fast rolls 9, 9, as shown in Fig. 2.

Thus by the conjoint action of fast rolls 9, 9 and slow rolls ll, 11', the successive partly-folded blanks B are progressively collected in a slow moving close or deeply shingled assembly D. Therein each blank B overlies and covers me next following blank B except for an exposed narrow area, of shingle dimension S along the inside margin of the latters trailing seal flap 4. Beyond the range of forward adjustment of the rolls 11, 11 are provided suitable means for rolling or spreading glue, for envelope sealing purposes, upon the adjacent exposed trailing seal flap margins of the blanks B, Bof said shingled assembly D. Such means, as shown, consists of a lower roller 13 and an upper shorter roll 14, both operating at the same low peripheral speed as the shingling rolls 11, 11, to continue the latters slow speed advance of the shingled assembly glue supply tub 16, as shown in Fig. 2. This glue, by the slow rotation of roll 14, is continuously and progressively spread onto the exposed trailing seal flap margins of the blanks B, B, of assembly D, in a wide band or stripe, as indicated by the strippling in Fig. l.

The above-described operation, except for the fact that the constituent blanks of slow moving assembly D have had their side flaps initially infolded, corresponds to the so-called coating or spreading process of seal flap gumming, well-known in the art, and described in Winkler & Dunnebier Patent No. 2,132,227 of October 4, I938 and many other patents.

This operation gives to every seal flap of the successive shingled blanks B, B a glue-coated margin 17 which is of uniform width throughout, with squared-off ends. The iatters conventional inward spacing from the blanks side edge folds 8, 8 gives to shingled assembly D, beyond the edges of the seal gluing thereon, the opposite marginal unglued areas l8. 18, which enable the assemblys slow advance to be continued. by the contact with said areas 18, 18 of a pair of spaced upper narrow for warding rolls or discs 20, 20, cooperating with a lower full length roll 21-said rolls 20, 21 having the same low peripheral speed as the rolls 1], 11 and 13, 14.

These final slow speed rolls 2t], 21 maintain their control of each blank B of assembly D during such blanks movement, at slow speed, across a suitable horizontal support element 22. The latter extends forwardly, as best shown in Fig. 2, from the vicinity of the final slow rolls 20, 21 to the vicinity of the bite between a lower full length roll 23, and a cooperating centrally positioned narrow roll or disc 24 mounted on a shaft 25. The bite of rolls 23, 24 is forwardly spaced from the bite of slow rolls 20, 21 by nearly the full blank length. That is to say, this spacing is such that the slow assemblys foremost and topmost blank (marked C in Figs. 1 and 4) will have its trailing seal flap edge released by the bite of slow rolls 20, 21, at just the instant that its leading back flap tip or apex 26 is seized by the bite of the rolls 23, 24. These rolls 23, 24 as a unit are made adjustable toward and away (see arrows y Fig. 2) from the final slow speed rolls 20, 21, to accommodate the last mentioned spacing to blanks of greater or less dimension, measured in the direction of their travel through the illustrated mechanism.

The peripheral speed imparted to the rolls 23, 24 is only about one-half the peripheral speed imparted to But this gives to the rolls 23, 24 a peripheral speed which shared in common by the shingling rolls 11, 11', the glue applying rolls 13, 14 and the final assembly forwarding rolls 20, 21. In consequence of this last, each successive foremost blank C of slow moving assembly D, upon encountering (by its tip or apex 26) the bite 23, 24, has its forward motion sharply accelerated. This acceleration is such that each so-seized foremost blank C is propelled forwardly through a distance "d" Fig. 4 (or from position C to position C in Fig. 1) in the time that it takes for the next-following blank of assembly D, under the influence of slow rolls celerated by rolls 23, 24, preceding position C blank, and so on, indefinitely, for each succeeding foremost and topmost blank of assembly D.

It is particularly to be noted that the narrow intermedihas a circumference that is equal in length to the blank displacement distance a; and that said roll 24 is suitably relieved or recessed, as shown escape contact at each revolution with the wet glue coated area 17 on each passing blanks seal flap margin. Also to be particularly noted is the fact that the principal burden on these intermediate speed rolls 23, 24 is merely to initiate the above-described acceleration of each successive foremost blank of assembly D; that is to say, once any such blank, by action of rolls 23, 24 on its leading apex 26 has hadits faster movement commenced, the blanks continued steady propulsion at this faster rate is taken over and subsequently maintained by the ing rollers, all operating at the same intermediate peripheral speed as that imparted to the rolls 23, 24.

One such set of intermediate speed rolls consists of a l, in closer relation to the final slow rolls 20, 21 than the rolls 23, 24. Despite this closer relation, a blank of assembly D, in its approach to blank position C will not come under the influence of these intermediate speed rolls itsacceleration has been initiated by the. above The same is true of the narrow rolls 25', 25' carried by the shaft 25 of central roll 24. Another set of intermediate speed rolls, consisting of a full length and cooperating upper narrow rolls or discs 31, 31 is arranged beyond the ing of a full length lower roll 32, narrow rolls or discs 33, 33, is arranged as shown in Fig. 1, beyond the mechanisms seam gum imprinting station G, presently to be described.

As clearly appears from Fig. l, the effect of accelerating formed into a shallowly shingled blank assembly E, which, exactly like that of Vincent E. Heywood Patent No. 2,772,611, dated December 4, 1956, exposes in close proximity to each other the two ditferent glue-receiving areas (leading side flap margins and trailing seal flap margin) of successive adjacent blanks. Said blank assembly E herein, the same as the shallowly shingled blank assembly E of said Heywood Patent No. 2,772,611, moves past the rotary glue imprinting device or devices of station G at a speed which is approximately only about one-half the highest blank speed through the machine, at which the flap folding operations on the successive spaced apart blanks are performed. Accordingly, at station G, any suitable rotary seam glue imprinting device 36, rotating (with its platen roll 36') in step with the intermediate speed of advance of the blank assembly E, will not attain a rotational speed at which centrifugal throw-01f of glue takes place until said highest blank speed (which determines the envelope production rate of the machine) is two or three times greater than the highest permissible blank speed in conventional rotary envelope making machines of the prior art. Furthermore, the blank assembly E herein has the same ability as the blank assembly E of said Heywood Patent No. 2,772,611, to prevent such glue as is thrown off centrifugally by rotary imprinting device 36, from accumulating on nearby machine surfaces, because it (said assembly E) covers all such surfaces.

The seam glue imprinting device 36 as herein shown is of multiple construction, and provides, at opposite ends of its shaft 37, two sets of matching narrow segments 38, 38' which are 180 degrees apart, and spaced from each other, circumferentially, by the distance d (Fig. 4) which, in shallowly shingled assembly E, separates the seam glue receiving margins along leading side flap edges 34, 34 of adjacent overlapped blanks. This multiple construction of the glue imprinting device 36 still further reduces its tendency for centrifugal glue throw-off, by increasing its radius, since centrifugal force is inversely proportional to the radius of rotation. The segments 38, 38 receive glue from a transfer roller 39 (Fig. 2) associated with a conventional glue receptacle 40. The rotary imprinting device 36 is so timed with the advance of assembly E that said segments 38, 38 provide successive narrow seam glue imprints 41, 41 for each blanks infolded side flaps 2, 2, just inwardly of the latters leading edges 34, 34.

While each successive foremost blank of assembly E is receiving its seam glue imprints 41, 41, as above described, its forward portions are passing across a suitable support 42, beyond rolls 32, 33, at the intermediate assembly speed imparted by said rolls. Upon the release by said rolls 32, 33 of each such blank, the latter is speeded up, substantially as described in said Heywood Patent No. 2,772,611, in order to draw it away from assembly E, for the folding over on score line 3a of its back or bottom flap 3, into seam-forming engagement with the glue imprints 41, 41 of its infolded side flaps. Any suitable mechanism for thus progressively de-shingling the successive blanks, by restoring to each in turn the high speed of advance imparted by the rolls 5, 5, 7, 7 and 9, 9 may be employed.

As herein shown for this purpose, the mechanism provides, just beyond support 42, a hollow roller 43, journaled on a stationary hollow shaft 44, and having counterclockwise rotation at the same peripheral speed as the high speed rolls 5, 5, 7, 7 and 9, 9. The roller 43, for seizure of each blank along its score line 3a, just as said blank is released by intermediate speed rolls 32, 33, has a suction port or slot 45 (Fig. 2) whose inner end is in periodic communication with the interior of shaft 44, through a port or opening 46 of limited angular extent; said shaft interior is connected to any suitable source of suction, such as a vacuum pump, not shown.

Figs. 1 and 2 show a foremost blank which has thus been suctionally gripped at its score line 3a by slot 45 of roller 43, and drawn downwardly by said rollers high speed rotation, away from assembly E, toward the line of bite between said roller 43 and an adjacent pressing and forwarding cylinder 47, which rotates clockwise at the same high peripheral speed as the roller 43.

Cylinder 47 is mounted, for its high speed rotation, on a stationary hollow shaft 48 (Fig. 2) having its interior connected to said source of suction, and providing a longitudinal port 49 of substantially 90 degrees angular extent, with which is adapted to periodically register the inner end of a slot or port 50 of the rotating cylinder 47. Said slot 50 at its outer end serves for the suction seizure, on each revolution of said cylinder 47, of each individualized or de-shingled blank which, as above described, is drawn downwardly by the high speed cylinder 43.

The respective port 46 and 49 of hollow shafts 44 and 48 are so positioned, as shown in Fig. 2, that suction through slot 50 becomes available, for blank seizure by cylinder 47, substantially coincidental with the cut-off of suction through slot 45, to release such blank from the roller or cylinder 43. The transfer of each blank from cylinder 43 to cylinder 47 occurs as their respective ports or slots and come into opposing substantial alinement, with the slot 50 seizing the blank in the same location as the slot 45, viz., at or just behind its score line 3a.

As each blank, upon seizure at its score line 3a by slot 45 moves downwardly with cylinder 43, its forwardly projecting back fiap 3, beyond said score line undergoes an upward bending or deflection which increases to a pronounced transverse fold 51 (Fig. 3) as the downward high speed blank movement, first by cylinder 43 and then by cylinder 47 carries each de-shingled blank, score line 30 leading, between said two cylinders. The pressing action of said cylinders accentuates said fold, and is of course also exerted to press together the overlapped seam connection of back flap 3 with the wet gluing 41, 41 of the infolded side flaps 2, 2. The cylinder 47, as shown at 52, Fig. 2, is suitably relieved, to prevent its contact with the wet seal gum 17 on each blank, as the latters trailing seal flap 4 is drawn between the cylinders 43 and 47. The cylinder 47 then delivers each envelope, as thus completed, to suitable feed belts 53, 54 running to drying mechanism, not shown, wherein the seal flap gum 17 is subject to prolonged drying.

I claim:

1. In the manufacture of envelopes from a succession of blanks advancing fiatwise at high speed in spaced relation with seal flaps trailing, the improvement which consists in folding inwardly the side flaps of the successive so-advancing spaced blanks, so progressively collecting the successive partly-folded blanks in a low speed closely shingled assembly that each blank thereof, except for the margin of its trailing seal flap is overlain by the preceding blank of said assembly, progressively spreading glue, in the low speed advance of said assembly, onto the so-exposed adjacent trailing seal flap margins of it successive partly-folded blanks, progressively so increasing in succession the speed of each foremost so-glued blank of said assembly as to just uncover, by its trailing seal flap edge, the leading margins of the next blanks infolded side flaps, thereby to create a shallowly shingled blank assembly whose speed of advance is appreciably lower than the blank speed at which the side flaps of the successive spaced blanks are folded inwardly, and imprinting with glue at said appreciably lower speed the successive exposed leading side flap margins of the blanks of said shallowly shingled assembly.

2. In the manufacture of envelopes from a succession of blanks advancing fiatwise at high speed in spaced relation with seal flaps trailing, the improvement which consists in folding inwardly the side flaps of the successive so advancing spaced blanks, progressively collecting the successive partly-folded blanks in a slow speed closely shingled assembly, for the progressive en masse gluing of their trailing seal flap margins, progressively partially deshingling said closely shingled blank assembly by speed up of each foremost so-glued blank thereof, but only to an extent such that its trailing seal flap edge uncovers and exposes the leading edges of the next blanks infolded side flaps, thereby to create a shallowly shingled blank assembly whose speed of advance is between the high blank speed at which the blanks side flaps are folded inwardly and the low speed of said closely shingled blank assembly, and imprinting with glue, speed, the successive exposed leading side flap margins of the blanks of said shallowly shingled assembly.

3. In the manufacture of envelopes from a succession of blanks advancing flatwise at high speed in spaced relation with seal flaps trailing, the improvement which consists in folding inwardly the side flaps of the successive so advancing spaced blanks, progressively collecting the successive partly-folded blanks in a slow speed closely shingled assembly, for the progressive en masse gluing of their trailing seal flap margins, progressively partially deshingling said closely shingled blank assembly by speed up of each foremost so-glued blank thereof, but only to an extent such that its trailing seal flap edge uncovers and exposes the leading edges of the next blanks infolded at said intermediate side flaps, thereby to create a shallowly shingled blank,

assembly whose speed of advance is between the high blank speed at which the blanks side flaps are folded inwardly and the low speed of said closely shingled blank assembly, imprinting with glue, at said intermediate speed, the successive leading side flap margins of the blanks of said shallowly shingled assembly, progressively completing the deshingling of the blanks of said intermediate speed assembly, by restoring to each foremost fully glued blank thereof the initial high speed at which the blanks side flaps are folded inwardly, and then folding over'the leading back flap of each successive deshingled blank, into adhesive seam connection with its side flaps.

4. In envelope making mechanism of the class described, means for rapidly advancing successive blanks llatwise in spaced relation, with their seal flaps trailing, means operative on each so-advancing blank to fold inwardly its side flaps, means for so progressively collecting the successive partly-folded blanks in a low speed closely shingled assembly that each blank thereof, except for the margin of its trailing seal flap, is overlain by the preceding blank of said assembly, means for progressively spreading glue, in the low speed advance of said assembly, onto the so-exposed adjacent trailing seal flap margins of its successive partly-folded blanks, means for progressively so increasing in succession the speed of each foremost so-glued blank of said assembly as to just uncover, by its trailing seal fiap edge, the leading margins of the next blanks infolded side flaps, thereby to create a shallowly shingled blank assembly whose speed of advance is appreciably lower than theblank speed at which the side flaps of the successive spaced blanks are folded inwardly, and means rotating in step with said appreciably lower speed for imprinting with glue the successive so-uncovcred leading side flap margins of the blanks of said shallowly shingled assembly 5. In envelope making mechanism of the class described, means for rapidly advancing successive blanks fiatwise in spaced relation, with their seal flaps trailing, means operative on each so-advancing blank to fold inwardly its side 'flaps, means for progressively collecting the successive partly-folded blanks in a slowspeed closely shingled assembly, for the progressive en masse gluing of their trailing seal flap margins, means for progressively partially deshingling said closely shingled blank assembly, by speed up of each foremost -so-glued blank thereof, but only to an extent such that its trailing seal flap-edge uncovers and exposes the leading edges of the next blanks infolded side flaps, whereby to create a shallowlyshingled blank assembly whose speed of advance is between the high blank speed at which the blanks side fiapsarc folded inwardly and the low speed of said closely shingled blank assembly, and means rotating in step with the intermediate speed of said shallowly shingled assembly. t'or imprinting with glue the marginal areas along the so-exposed leading side flap edges of each blank or said shallowly shingled assembly.

6. ln envelope "making mechanism of the class described. means for rapidly advancing successive blanks Ilatwisc in spaced relation, with their seal flaps trailing,

means operative on each so-advancing blank to fold inwardly its side flaps, means for progressively collecting the successive partly-folded blanks in a slow speed closely shingled assembly, for the progressive en masse gluing of their trailing seal flap margins, means for progressively partially deshingling said closely shingled blank assembly, by speed up of each foremost so-glued blank thereof, but only to an extent such that its trailing seal flap edge uncovers and exposes the leading edges of the next blanks infolded side flaps, whereby to create a shallowly shingled blank assembly whose speed of advance is appreciably lower than the blank speed at which the side flaps of the respective blanks are folded inwardly, means rotating in step with the speed of advance of said shallowly shingled assembly for imprinting with glue the successive leading side flap margins of the blanks of said shallowly shingled assembly, means for progressively deshingling said shallowly shingled blank assembly, by restoring to each foremost fully glued blank thereof the initial high speed at which its side flaps are folded inwardly, and means for folding over the leading back flap of each successive deshingled blank, into adhesive seam connection with its side flaps.

7. In the manufacture of envelopes from a succession of blanks advancing flatwise at high speed in spaced relation with seal flaps trailing, the improvement which consists in folding inwardly the side flaps of the successive so advancing spaced blanks, progressively collecting the successive partly-folded blanks in a slow speed closely shingled assembly, for the progressive en masse gluing of their trailing seal flap margins, progressively partially deshingling said closely shingled blank assembly by speed up of each foremost so-glued blank thereof, but only to an extent such that its trailing seal flap edge uncovers and exposes the seam glue receiving margins of the next blanks infolded side flaps, thereby to create a shallowly shingled blank assembly whose speed of advance, is appreciably lower than the blank speed at which the side flaps of the respective blanks are folded inwardly and imprinting with glue, at said appreciably lower speed, the so-exposed side flap margins of the successive blanks of said shallowly shingled assembly.

8. In the manufacture of envelopes from a succession of blanks advancing flatwise at high speed in spaced relation with seal flaps trailing, the improvement which consists in folding inwardly the side flaps of the successive so advancing spaced blanks, progressively collecting the successive partly-folded blanks in a slow speed closely shingled assembly, for the progressive en masse gluing of their trailing seal flap margins, progressively partially deshingling said closely shingled blank assembly by speed up of each foremost so-glued blank thereof, but only to an extent such that its trailing seal flap edge uncovers and exposes the seam glue receiving margins of the next blanks infolded side flaps, thereby to create a shallowly shingled blank assembly whose speed of advance is ,between the high blank speed at which the blanks side flaps are folded inwardly and the low speed of said closely shingled blank assembly, and imprinting with glue, at said intermediate speed, the successive exposed seam glue receiving side flap margins of the blanks of said shallowly shingled assembly.

9. In the manufacture of envelopes from a succession of blanks advancing flatwise at high speed in spaced relation with seal flaps trailing, the improvement which consists in folding inwardly the side flaps of the successive so advancing spaced blanks, progressively collecting the successive partly-folded blanks in a slow speed closely shingled assembly, for the progressive en masse gluing of their trailing seal flap margins, progressively partially deshingling said closely shingled blank assembly by speed up of each foremost so-glued blank thereof, but only to an extent such that its trailing seal flap edge uncovers and exposes the scam glue receiving margins of the next blanks infolded side flaps, thereby to create a shallowly shingled blank assembly whose speed of advance is between the high blank speed at which the blanks side flaps are folded inwardly and the low speed of said closely shingled blank assembly, imprinting with glue, at said intermediate speed, the successive seam glue receiving side flap margins of the blanks of said shallowly shingled assembly, progressively completing the deshingling of the blanks of said intermediate speed assembly, by restoring to each foremost fully glued blank thereof the initial high speed at which the blanks side flaps are folded inwardly, and then folding over the leading back flap of each successive deshingled blank, into adhesive seam connection with its side flaps.

10. In envelope making mechanism of the class described, means for rapidly advancing successive blanks flatwise in spaced relation with their seal flaps trailing, means operative on each so-advancing blank to fold inwardly its side flaps, means for progressively collecting the successive part1 -folded blanks in a slow speed closely shingled assembly, for the progressive en masse gluing of their trailing seal flap margins, means for progressively partially deshingling said closely shingled blank assembly, by speed up of each foremost so-glued blank thereof, but only to an extent such that its trailing seal flap edge uncovers and exposes the seam glue receiving margins of the next blanks infolded side flaps, whereby to create a shallowly shingled blank assembly whose speed of advance is between the high blank speed at which the blanks side flaps are folded inwardly and the low speed of said closely shingled blank assembly, and means rotating in step with the intermediate speed of said shallowly shingled assembly, for imprinting with glue the successive so exposed side flap margins of each blank of said shallowly shingled assembly.

11. In envelope making mechanism of the class de- 3 scribed, means for rapidly advancing successive blanks flatwise in spaced relation with their seal flaps trailing, means operative on each so-advancing blank to fold in wardly its side flaps, means for progressively collecting the successive partly-folded blanks in a slow speed closely shingled assembly, for the progressive en masse gluing of their trailing seal flap margins, means for progressively partially deshingling said closely shingled blank assembly, by speed up of each foremost so-glued blank thereof, but only to an extent such that its trailing seal flap edge uncovers and exposes the seam glue receiving margins of the next blanks unfolded side flaps, whereby to create a shallowly shingled blank assembly whose speed of advance is appreciably lower than the blank speed at which the side flaps of the respective blanks are folded inwardly, means rotating in step with the speed of advance of said shallowly shingled assembly for imprinting with glue the successive so exposed side flap margins of the blanks of said shallowly shingled assembly, means for progressively deshingling said shallowly shingled blank assembly, by restoring to each foremost fully glued blank thereof the initial high speed at which its side flaps are folded inwardly, and means for folding over the leading back flap of each successive deshingled blank, into adhesive scam connection with its side flaps.

12. Envelope making mechanism as claimed in claim 10, in which the rotary glue imprinting means provides a plurality of scam glue imprinting segments.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS June 2, 1931 Ian. 16, 1934

Patent Citations
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US1807867 *Jun 12, 1928Jun 2, 1931Smithe Machine Co Inc F LMachine for making envelopes
US1943985 *Jun 12, 1930Jan 16, 1934Smithe Machine Co Inc F LMethod and machine for making envelopes of the open end type
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US2983201 *Jan 24, 1958May 9, 1961Berkley Machine CoMethod of and apparatus for making envelopes
US3045560 *Jun 11, 1958Jul 24, 1962Electrolux CorpApparatus for and method of manufacturing flexible containers
US3288037 *Jan 16, 1964Nov 29, 1966Berkley Machine CoSide flap folding section of a rotary envelope making machine
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Classifications
U.S. Classification493/248, 493/265, 493/256, 493/249, 493/266
International ClassificationB31B19/00
Cooperative ClassificationB31B21/00, B31B2221/10
European ClassificationB31B21/00