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Publication numberUS2812181 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 5, 1957
Filing dateJul 23, 1954
Priority dateJul 23, 1954
Publication numberUS 2812181 A, US 2812181A, US-A-2812181, US2812181 A, US2812181A
InventorsRichman Harold
Original AssigneeRichman Harold
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baseball card game apparatus
US 2812181 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov'. 5, 1957 H. RICHMAN BASEBALL CARD GAME APPARATUS Filed Ju1 "2;s, 1954 4 Sheets-Sheet l GROUND BALL HIT TO FIRST Bass ACE OF HEARTS CENTER FIELD A0 A HIT OR A Y FLVOUT T0 CENTER IF w 1s A mom.

RUNNERS ADVANCE QNE BRQE zzvmvrox -,HAROLD RICHMAN 5 AI'TJR/Vfl Nov. 5, 1957 I H. RICHMAN BASEBALL CARD GAME APPARATUS Fiied Ju1y 23. 1954 4 Sheekls-Sheet 2 CENTER.

IF THERE IS 'uo RUNNER ON 585E. 0% TWO 0U'I'5 GROUND our m FIRST BHSE BUT \v THERE ARI. RUNNBRS ON 5855 It Is A A E C D GROUND BALL GROUND FRONT R NNER OUT 15 FORCED OUI' RUNNSRS BATTER I5 ADVANCE.

SAFE I ONE BAGR FIELD IF THERE I5 I40 RUNNER OK 51152 ORTWO OUTS FLYOVI' To CENTER FIELD 501' IF THERE RRE R NNER! ON BA 55 IT IS A R B- C D FLY BALL FLY U RUNNBRS TRAPPED RDNNERS ADVANCE DY 007- HOLD FISl-DER THEIR IF THERE. IS NO RUNNER 0N BAQE 0% Two ours PLYOU'I' I'D RIGHT FIELD BUT IF THERE HRS RUNNER-5 ON 5355 DOUBLE FLYO U'f FLYO U'l PLAY RUNNERS WNMBRS HOLD ADVANCE. THEIR ONE Bases BASE IF THERE Is no R NNER. 0N sasa 09.1w ou-rs FOUL our ro CATCI-IER an IF mans Aim RUNNER-5 ON 5955 IT I5 A FOUL QUT PLUS A B c, n

(.A'ICHER cA-rcnsa PICKS are P565 WILD mom" RIJNIISRS RUNNER nwmca mm mm.

IF THERE I5 N0 RUNNER N BMEE OR TW OUI'S FLYOUT To LEFT FIELD A' a a n rw/ou-r FLYov'r RUNNERS R NNE-RS HOLD ADVANCE THEIR 0N5 sAszs 51452 I I Q IN V EN TOR.

HAROLD RlCI-IMAN Nov. 5, 1957 2,812,181

H. RICHMAN BASEBALL CARD GAME APPARATUS Filed Jul as, 1954 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 FOUL OUT TO F|R5T BASE POP our TO FIRST BASE BUT IF THERE ARE RUNNER ON ALL BASES BUTTER ls INJURED AND STAYs our FIVE GAMES W W F 1 IF THERE IS NO RUNNER IF THERE \S N0 RUNNER ON BASE OR TWO OUTS ON 5455 OR TWO OUTS' GROUND OUT TO SECOND 5E GROVNDOUT TO SNDRTSI'OP 5 E CON D .SHORTSTOP BASE am" IF THERE ARE am- 11: man: An: RUNNERS nuances onus: n' is A on BASE IT as A A a c. o A s, c|

anouuo ism. cnovmo nv am FLY our nmmsns non-r nunusn ou-r PLAYER RUNNERS Awmc: 1s roRcEo our auNNEns ooumo BATTER 40mm: on Fmsr I .sAFE or: us: as: K K I g IF THERE IS NO GROUND OUT 1'0 RUNNERSQN BA E A B C GROUND BA L BATTER 'nmowu our 41' FIRST 5A5! J19. El

ON BASE OR TWO OUTS um- 11- TNFRE ARE RUNNER DOUBLED OFF FIRST RUNNER FLY OUT BASE Hanum: Rmnmau HTTURNEY United States Patent 2,812,181 BASEBALL CARD GAME APPARATUS Harold Richman, Great Neck, N. Y. Application July 23, 1954, Serial No. 445,218 1 Claim. 01. 273-93 This invention relates to card games and, more particularly, to a card game based upon the science and method of play of baseball. I

A principal object of the present invention is to provide a card game by which the various plays of baseball may be represented in detail and in conformity with the nationally recognized methods and rules of the playing of baseball, and in the playing of which the players may fully utilize their knowledge of the science and strategy of baseball.

Another object of the invention is to provide a card game in the playing of which the baseball knowledge of the player is the major element of success and in which the element of chance has been reduced to a minimum.

A further object of the invention is to provide a card game by which offense and defense playsare represented in detail and are at all times fully under control of the respective players.

Yet another object is to provide a card game in which the success of the players largely depends upon their knowledge of the official rules of baseball.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a game which so faithfully represents the various andintricate plays of baseball as to be fully adapted for use in the teaching of inside baseball or the conducting of what is known as Skull-practice.

A further object of the invention is to provide a game of cards to simulate a game of baseball in which a playing field and playing cards are used, the. cards being so arranged that the play of the same will closely resemble the play in an actual game of baseball.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a card game resembling a baseball game in which the ability of the individual player to hit, walk, field, or steal, and the type of pitching encountered are factors in the game.

A still further object is to provide a game of cards to simulate a game of baseball in which a playing fieldis used having means for supporting the cards in stack formation, during play and for supporting the cards in storage.

It is further proposed to provide a game of this character which is simple and compact in construction and which can be manufactured and sold at a reasonable cost.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a game board representing a baseball playing field embodying the invention.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary plan view showing the playing field extension in folded condition forserving as a pocket for the playing cards.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on the plane; of the line 3-3 of Fig. 1. i

"ice

2 .Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken on the plane of the line 4'4 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a view showing both faces of a First Base playing card.

Fig. 6 is a view showing both faces of a playing card. 7

Fig. 7 is a view showing both faces of a Center Field playing card.

Fig. 8 is a view showing both faces of a playing card.

Fig. 9 is a view showing both faces of a playing card.

Fig. 10 is a face view of an offensive playing card. Fig. 11 is a face view of an offensive playing card. Fig. 12 is a View showing both faces of an offensive card. i

Fig. card.

Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Card.

Fig. 18 is a face view of a players card. Fig. 19 is a view showing both faces of another First Base playing card.

Fig. 20 is a view showing both faces of still another First Base playing card.

Fig. 21 is a view showing both faces of a Second Base playing card.

Fig. 22 is a view showing both faces of a Shortstop playing card.

Fig. 23 is a view showing both faces of a Third Base playing card.

. The game is played on a playing field 10 in the form of a baseball field including a diamond and an outfield. A deck 11 of playing cards is used and a card 12 for Catcher Left Field Right Field 13 is a view showing both faces of an offensive 14 is a face view of a Walk Card.

15 is a face view of a Strikeout card.

16 is a face view of a Triple Play card.

17 is a view showing both faces of an Error each of the eighteen players on the two opposing teams.

The game is played by two opponents ofiiciating as managers of the two opposing teams and before the game the managers arrange the batting order or line-up of their respective teams.

' The players represented by the cards 12 are given arbitrary numbers and are classified as to their fielding ability' as players by the letters a, b, c or d, and are further classified as to their ability to get on base by a walk when at bat by the notations wa, wb, we or wd.

The imaginary pitchers of the two teams are also classifield as to their pitching ability by the numbers 1, 2, n3, 4 or 5.

The deck-includes playing cards 13 on the top side of which are printed the various positions on the playing field, such as First Base, Second Base, Third Base, Shortstop, Center Field, Left Field, Right Field and Catcher. Each card 13 is given a number on the right-hand corner of its reverse side to indicate its value. The cards 13 are piled on the playing field at their respective positions. For example, the cards 13 labeled First Base are piled up on the first base position on the play ing field.

There are seven First Base cards, four of which are numbered 8 on all of which is printed at the top of the reverse side of the following: If there is no runner on base or two outs Ground Out to First Base. This indicates that if there is no runner on the bases or if two batters are alreadyout, the batter has grounded out to the first baseman and the batter is scored as out. All of the First Base cards numbered 8 also have printed underneath various combinations of possible plays which result when the ball is grounded to the first baseman and there 3 are runners on the bases, each card having different plays Printed t rei Forekampleione ofsaid8 catds 'has' printedtheie on But if there are runners on base it is a a b"c"" ground ballf'frdnt runne'r is forced outf'battr issaf .d "groifind out, runners advance one base. This indicatestliatif the' filder is" classified asan-a b or c pl'ayerj'the hall hit by the batter to the first baseman is thEiifthriiwn" by him to force' out' the' front runner who is 'scbre'd as out, the batter being scored as safe. If the fielder-ire; d playergthe batter is consideredas having grounded out tothe first baseman and the batter is scored as" out," and therunne ror' run'n'ersbn' th b'ase's advance oneb ase each. A sample First Base card numbered8 is=il1u-" tratedin' Fig? 5. g I h r There isa; s ingle'First Base card numhered l0 on whichisp rinte'd Pop Out to'Fifsf'Bas" which isrs elfexplanatory. A sample First Base card numbered '10 is'shownin' Fig 19L There are two First Base cardsnumhered 11," of which has printed thereon"Fou1-' Oilttd First Base which is self-explanatory. I n k The other First Base cardinumbe'red l'l haspriti'ted thereon Foul Oi1tto First Basel If'theieafe three rtim ners on base batter is injured and will be out forfive games. But if there are two or le'ssrlunners on base there is no injury. This indicates that thefbattef has fouled out to the firstbaseman and is" scrr'riedias If there are three runners on base at the time; the batter is injured and must stay out of the next fivegaihesi Thi's'is accomplished by" leaving the injured batterscard 12 out of the players deck. If there are" two otjless ni'n'ner's on'the base" when the batter foulsent, their is no injury. A sample First Base card numbered 1 1 is shown in'Fig. 20.

There are twelve Second Base cards, four or 9, ahd five rilimbered 10. All the SCCifdBdS ards have printed at the top of the following? If' there isno runner onfba's'e or two outs Ground OutTo Sec'on'd- Base" and underneath is printed vaiious eornbirihtibh? of possible plays; \vhich result-when" the b all' is h'it to the second baseman and there are" ruhners" on thebifses"; each card having different plays printed thereon; depend in; on whether the fielderis class a? b .or ar Inforrir, ea'cli ScjondBasw-card'is imilar tome-First Base card numbered 8 illustrated in Fig: 5'; but has different combinations of plays'therebni Asa'rhple ond Base card numbered 6 is shown in Fig. 21-;-

There are fourteen Shortstop cards, ten of which are numbered 7, three of which" arenumbered 8" and One Of which is'nurhber'ed 9". All of the" Shortstop cards have printed at the top the folldwifig'r If tlie'i isnorunner on base or two'outsfirdutid' Out'To Sliortstop and underneath. is printed various? combinatio'hs of possible plays, depending upon the cl'a'ss of the'fieldei, Y which result when the ball is' h it tothe'playnat-shortsfip and there are fu'n'ners on the bases; each da'rd' haij ih'g different plays printed thereohf; the card beihg siifiiia'r in form and appearance to the Firs 'tsase c ard n'iihibored 8 illustrated Fig; 5 having differeht'plgiys thereon. A sample Sh'oftstop c'a'i'd' nuriiiieta 7" is shown in Fig. 22. H 1 Nihe"Thi rd Base cards are pr dvid dlsiir of-wlii'if are numbered 9351s: numbered 16 grid two niihib e'jr'ed the topfIf. there is no runner on base or two outs Grou'fid 4 thereon the following: Pop Out to Third Base which is self-explanatory.

One of the Third Base cards numbered 11 reads Foul Out to Third Base which is self-explanatory.

The other Third Base card numbered ll reads Foul Out to Third Base. If there are two or more runners on base batter isT'oTitfr two games. But if there ha less thah" twd riinners" on base there is no injury. This indicates that the batter has fouled out to the third bas'einar'iahd isHcbr'da'sOutf Furthermore, if there" w'eietwodr more 'runnets on base at the time the batter fouled out, the batter is injured and must stay out of the next twdg'aihesf lf les'sthan two men were on base, there is no injury. A sample Third Base card numbered 9 is shown in Fig. 23.

Nine Catcher cards are provided, four of which are numbered 8 one-numbered l0 and three numbered 11- and one' numbered 12.

or two outs-Strike'Outf Underneath is printed various p'bsible plays=whiehi result, depending upon the class of the fielderg'when'the batte'r' strikes outand the catcher th-rbwsito the base to throw'out aru'nner, each cardhaving ditfereiit" plays 'pr-inted thereon.

Another of'said8* cards hasprinte'd on-the top If there is no runner on base or two outs Foul Out To Catcher a'nd'underneathhre printed possible plays which resultfif ther'eare" men" on the bases and the catcher throws in an-attempt to throw a runner out the results depending upon the class-'of the fielder.

The fdljl'th Ofsaid 8 car'dshas printed on the top If there are no runners on base or two outs Dribble Oh: to the-Catcher and-underneath are printed possible plays when this occurs, depending upon the class of the fielder. A'sample'catchersward numbered 8 is illustrated in-Figi fis' y The single1'0 car'd is blank on'th'e reverse side.

Twoof-the' 11 eardse'achre'ad Foul Out to Catcher" which is self xplanator'y.

The'third I l eard'r'eads Foul Out to Catcher. If there'are two or'more runners on base'batter' is? out for two games. But if there are less than two' runners on base there i'snp injury which is"se'lf-explanatory.

ThesihgIe 12" card isblankon the reverse side.

The deck' includes" six Center Field cards, three of which are numbered 6; ohe' numbered 7" and two numbered 12. The 6 cards'and the single 7 card each-reads at the top It'thereis nor'unner' on base or twii'outs Fly Out' to Center Field which is self-explanatory. Underneath is printed possible plays which result ifthe batter fiie's'oht'to the center fielder and there are runners on base. A sample 6 card is illustrated in Fig-7'.

One of tlie'1-2* cards-reads FlyOut toCentcr Field rilnriers' advance one base which indicates that the batter has flied out to the center fielder and the batter is scdred as outg but the runneror runners advance one Base eabh:

Tli other I -2 'cfa'rd reads" Li' Out to Center Field runners idvaiic'e' o'fie base. This-inditiat'e's that the'batter lined oiiit' t'o' th cen ter fielder' and the batter is scored as disp rate rhiiht's advance one base each.

Six Left Field ards are included in the deck; three ofwhich 5, one numbered 6" and two fii'l l' nhffi "12. three 5 and the one 6 Cards each read If there is no runner on base or two outs F19 out it; Le'ftFiel which s self eitp'lanatory. Underneath are printed possible plays which result if the hattjr fiis oiit' w the leftlfiie'lder and there are" runners Base. A simple 5 card is illhstrate'd in Fig. 8.

The two 12 cards read Line Out to Left Fieldifiirfneron scores. other ruhne'rs hold their bases. This indicates that the batter has lined out to the left fielder and is scored as out, and that the runner on third Twoof the 8 cards have printed on the top If there is'norun'ner onbase- -FlyOut to Left.

a Fly Out to Center.

bases. monds 'and one labeled Four of Diamonds each read scores and the other runners hold their positions on the bases.

Four Right Field cards are provided, all of which are numbered 6 and all of which have printed on the top the following: If there is no runner on base Fly Out to Right Field. Underneath are printed possible plays which result if the batter flies out to the right fielder and there are runners on base. A sample 6 card is illustrated in Fig. 9. g

The deck also includes seventeen offensive playing cards 14 representing ground balls hit to the various positions on the playing field, all of said cards having numbers on their right-hand corners, indicating the values of the cards. One of the seventeen cards has printed thereon Ground Ball Hit to First Base and is numbered 9; four read Ground Ball Hit to Second Base and are numbered 8; five read Ground Ball Hit to Shortstop, four of which are numbered 7 and one numbered 12;three read Ground Ball Hit to Third Base and are numbered 9; two read Fly Ball Hit to Center Field and are numbered 10; one reads Fly Ball Hit to Left Field and is numbered 10; and one reads Fly Ball Hit to Right Field and is numbered 11.

A sample card 14 is illustrated in Fig. 10.

There are also provided twenty-one offensive cards 15 of various suits, such as hearts, spades, diamonds and clubs with the representations of the suits printed thereon, and all indicating a hit or a fly out to one of the outfield positions. Of these twenty-six cards 16, six are of the heart suit. One card of said six is labeled Ace of Hearts and reads A Hit or a Fly Out to Center. If it is a fly out, runners advance one base. Another card is labeled Two of Hearts and reads A Hit or a Fly Out to Right. If it is a fly out runner on third scores. Other runners hold their bases. Another card is labeled Three of Hearts and another Four of Hearts and each reads A Hit or a Fly Out to Right. The fifth :is labeled Six of Hearts and reads A Hit or a Fly Out to Left.

The spade suit has six cards. One of the six spade .cards islabeled Ace of Spades and another is labeled Two of Spades and each reads A Hit or Fly Out to Left. If it is a fly out, runners advance one base. Another card is labeled Three of Spades and another is labeled Four of Spades and each reads A Hit or a ofSpades and reads A Hit or a Fly Out to Center.

The diamond suit includes six cards. One of said cards is labeled Ace of Diamonds and reads A Hit or If it is a fly out runners advance one base. Another card is labeled Two of Diamonds and reads A Hit or a Fly Out to Center. If it is a fly out runner on third scores. Other runners hold their Two other cards, one labeled Three of Dia A Hit or a Fly Out to Center. Another card islabeled Five of Diamonds and reads A Hit or a Fly Out to Left. The other card is labeled Six of Diamonds and reads A Hit or a Fly Out to Center.

The club suit includes six cards. One card is labeled Ace of Clubs and reads A Hit or a Fly Out to Center.

If it is a fly out, runners advance one base. A second card is labeled Two of Clubs and reads A' Hit or a Fly Out to Center. If it is a fly out, runner on third scores. Other runners hold their bases. Two cards, one labeled Three of Clubs and one labeled Four of Clubseach read A Hit or a Fly Out to Center. A fifth card is labeled Six of Clubs and reads A Hit or a Fly Out to Right. I

A sample card 15 is illustrated in Fig. 11.

The playing deck also includes five offensive cards 16 labeled Sacrifice, Bunt, Squeeze Play, Hit and Run. 'One of said cards, for example, reads Sacrifice-Batter is out. Runners advance one base. Squeeze Play- Batter pops out. Runners hold. Hit and Run-Batter The fifth of-such'cards islabeled Six grounds out. Runners advance one base. Batter is safe. Front runner is out. Other runners advance one base. A sample of one of said cards 16 is illustrated in Fig. 12.

Three offensive cards 17 labeled Steals and Risks are also included in the deck. Said cards 17 show the results of attempted single steals, double steals, triple steals and other risks attempted by the players. A sample card 17 is illustrated in Fig. 13 and is self-explanatory.

The offensive cards also include nine cards 18 labeled Walk Cards, each card being divided into four columns headed wa wb we and wd indicating the classes into which the players of the teams are divided according to their ability to obtain a walk when at bat. A sample card 18 is illustrated in Fig. 14 and is self-explanatory.

Four cards indicated at 19 and labeled Strike Out are also included in the deck. The cards are numbered at the right-hand corners to indicate their values. Two of the cards are labeled Strike Out and are numbered 0. One is labeled Strike Out and numbered 11. It reads If there are two runners or more on base there is an injury. Batter is out with injuries for two games. This indicates that if the batter strikes out when there are two runners or more on the bases, he is injured and cannot play for the next two games. A fourth card is labeled Strike Out and numbered 12 and reads If there are three runners on base, batter is injured five games. In this case, the batter cannot play in the next five games. A sample Strike Out card is illustrated in Fig. 15.

Another card indicated at 20 and labeled Triple Play and numbered 12 is included in the playing deck. The card 20 is illustrated in Fig. 16.

The playing deck also includes three cards 21 labeled Error Card, which signifies that a player is to pick out a card from the Error pack. A sample Error Card is illustrated in Fig. 17.

A players card 12 is illustrated in Fig. 18 and has printed thereon at the top the name of the player, his position on the field, his rank by letter as a fielder, the number he has been assigned and his rank as a walker when at bat. The card is divided into five vertical columns numbered at the top from left to right, 1 2 3 4 and 5 indicating the class or type of pitching encountered by the player when at bat. The card is further divided into six horizontal columns representing from top to bottom, respectively, the aces, twos, threes, fours, fives and sixes of the various suits shown on playing cards 15 and opposite the names of the various suits in each vertical column appears the Word out or suitable abbreviations indicating that the batter made a one base hit, a two base hit, a three base hit, a home run, a pop out, etc. The players card can only be viewed if the deck card says A Hit or A Fly Ball. On the card 12 the abbreviations stand for the following: 1b a one base hit; 2b a two base hit; hr home run; hr l-6 home run if cards numbered 1 to 6 are picked; 3b 1-12 three base hit if cards numbered 1 to 12 are picked; p0 pop out; po 9l2 pop out if cards numbered 9 to "12 are picked, etc.

In playing the game, the numbers assigned to the players of each team are totaled. For example, the numbers of the players on each team might total forty-two, for example. The following arbitrary table has been fixed for designating a teams standing as to its liability to commit errors in fielding:

.Tearn totals: Rating 49-57 first 45-48 second 4044 third 1-39 fourth This indicates that the team whose players numbers total from 49 to 57, inclusive, have the best record for :7 playing errorless ball, the team .whose total is from 45 to 48, inolusive, thesecond best, the-teamxwith totals:40 to 44, inclusive, is next, and the team with totals.1.to39, inclusive, the fourth.

In playing the game, the. cards are thoroughly shufiled and'distributed and stacked on theirrespective positions onthe playing field 10-with the toplabeledsides uppermost. The playingcards are thoroughly shuftledand stacked on the pit'ehers -box. The Sacrifice, Bunt, Squeeze Play, Hitand Run Cards-16, and the Steals and Risks cards 17 are piled in separate stacks off of the playingfield but convenient to the player. Themanager of the team at bat'selects the card of the playerwho'is first atbat, as appears from the batting order, and with this players card asaguide he 'picks'the top card off of the pack-of cards '14-onthe pitchers box. He reads and follows 'the instructions on the reverse'side of the card and on the players card. For example, ifthe card 14 picked reads Ground Ball Hit to First Base he picks the top card marked gFirst Base piled up at the first base position. 'If it.is a First Base card numbered 8" reading, for example, If there is no runner on base or two outs Ground Out to First Base, the batter is considered to'have grounded out to the first baseman and is scored as. out. Another players card is'then selected and a card picked from the stack on the pitchers box and the instructions and results printed on such card and on the players card are followed. For example, this second cardpicked might be a Second Base card numbered "6 reading in part as follows: 'But if there are runners on base, it is an a b c or"d ground out, runners advance one base. If we suppose there are runners on base, we look at thefielders card 12 and if he is an a b c or d class player, .he is considered to have grounded out to the second baseman and he is scored as out, but the runners advance one base each. The picking of cards continues until three batters are scored as out.

The manager of the opposing team takes his turn at picking the cards off of the pitchers box and following instructions until three of his batters are scored as out when the inning is considered as over.

.If a walk card 18 is picked for the batter, the batters rankingis found from his card, whether we wb wc or wd, and the result is found underneath his respective rank.

If the batter desires to attempt to steal, a Steals and Risks card 17 is taken from the top of such deck of cards 17 and the result will be read on the card.

In order to sacrifice, bunt, pull a squeeze or a hit and run play, acard 16 is taken from the top of the deck of Sacrifice, Bunt, Squeeze Play, Hit and Run cards and the results Will appear on the card.

After each inning the main deck of cards are reshufiled and stacked in their respective positions.

In order tochange a pitcher, the manager of the team on the defensive merely cuts the deck of cards on the pitchers box.

To ascertain if a batter advances two bases on a base hit and three bases on a double, the next card on the top of the deck on the pitchers box is pulled. If the card is numbered 6 or over, the runner or runners advance two bases on a single .and three bases on a double. If the card is numbered or lower, the runners one base on a single and two bases on a double.

The printing matter on the different cards is so arranged that when the game is played intelligently and skillfully the play closely follows the play in a regular outdoor baseball game. A complete box score may be kept showing the hits, runs, errors, etc. of each play. Suitable coins, disks, buttons or the like may be used to indicate base runners and which are to be placed on;

the proper base or bases and moved from base to base or to the home plate as the play on the card or cards indicate and as theggamerproceeds.

An important feature-of the invention is the, provision of :anextension to the. playing field, indicated at22. This extension is rectangular in shape. and'is formed integrally with the'playing field, the extensionxbeing separated therefrom -by-a groove .23 to permit folding of the extension. It provides ready means for supportingdecks of playing cards'instacked formation in spaced relation during the playing of the game. The spacing or separating means for the stacks takes the form of. pairs of tabs 24 outstruck from the material oftheextension and. aligned crosswise of the extension with. alternating single outstruck tabslS therebetween :and centrally of the pairs of tabs. This construction divides the extension for supporting :in spaced relation three stacks of cards such as the :Error" cards v21, the Steals and Risks cards 17 and the Sacri-' fice, Bunt, Squeeze Play,-Hit and -Run cards 16.

When the game is not being played, the extension may 'be folded over "the playing field 10 'as shown in Fig. 2, andthetbottom edge fastened to the playingfield 10 by means of socketfasteners 26 mounted onithe bottom edge of the extension coasting with stud fasteners 27 mounted on the playing'field. The upper edge ofthe extension is unattached whereby the extension is converted into a pocket 28 for storing the playing cards when not in use.

The playing fieldlt) is also formed with lateral projections 29 and 30 forming extensions of the First Base" and Third Base positions, respectfully, and withpro- -jections 31, 32 and.33 forming extensions of the Left Field, Center Field and Right Field positions, re-

spectively. These projections can be readily graspedby the fingersof the userto facilitate manipulation ohthe game board.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiment ofi'ny invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise construction .herein disclosed and 'the right is reserved to all changes .and modifications coming within thescope of the invention as-defined in the appendedclaim.

Having thusdescribed my invention, What I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

In abaseball card'game, a game board bearing a representation of a diamond and outfield, each having a plurality of playing positions, the playing positions on the diamond comprising ahome plate, a first base, second base-and third base, the outfield playing positions comprising left field, center field, and right field, said game board having an extension projecting laterally of the diamondadjacent the home plate, said game board being formed with a groove for dividing the extension from the game board proper'and for facilitating folding of the extension 'over the game board, a plurality of tabs struck out from the material of the extension and spaced from each other and arranged to retain decks of playing-cards in spaced stacks thereon, and a plurality of coactingstud and socket fasteners on the game board and bottom edge of the extension respectively for fastening the extension to the game board proper in folded condition over the stacks of cards, whereby the folded extension may serve as a pocket for cards retained between said tabs, said game board having short projections adjacent the :first base, third base, left field, center field, and right field playing positions for facilitating handling of the game board.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,113,504 Steele Oct. 13, 191-4 1,269,276 Harris June 11, 1918 1,410,959 Ritter Mar. 28, 1922 (Other references on following page) UNITED STATES PATENTS Hammons Mar. 17, 1925 Anderson Mar. 24, 1925 Reisz Aug. 11, 1925 Horowitz Oct. 13, 1925 Lambert Oct. 27, 1931

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1113504 *Oct 17, 1913Oct 13, 1914Charles M SteeleBase-ball game.
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US1410959 *Apr 26, 1921Mar 28, 1922Ritter Claude APlaying-card hand holder
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US2347506 *Sep 8, 1941Apr 25, 1944Raymond R RiehleGame
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US2626155 *Dec 2, 1949Jan 20, 1953Beierle FerdinandBaseball game board
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3957269 *Mar 21, 1975May 18, 1976Reginald BouchardTactical baseball game
US4210335 *Jul 28, 1977Jul 1, 1980Licciardi Bartholomew ABaseball game
US4687199 *Nov 29, 1985Aug 18, 1987Enrique AguirregomezcortaBase ball game
US4728108 *Dec 24, 1986Mar 1, 1988Nffx Design Di Vanna Gazzeri & C.S.A.S.Pack of playing cards
US4776593 *Sep 25, 1987Oct 11, 1988Dipersio MarshaVCR baseball game
US5145173 *Apr 15, 1991Sep 8, 1992The Pent CorporationBaseball game
US5201520 *Jan 27, 1992Apr 13, 1993Castle Michael RBaseball game apparatus
US6170829 *Feb 12, 1999Jan 9, 2001Marshall HarveyBaseball game
US6439572 *Jul 31, 2000Aug 27, 2002Teresa H. BowenBaseball and soccer training system for children
US6663107 *Mar 21, 2002Dec 16, 2003Anthony J. FisherCard game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/244.2, 273/287, 273/296, 273/298, 273/148.00R
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00031
European ClassificationA63F3/00A4B