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Publication numberUS2812740 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1957
Filing dateOct 4, 1954
Priority dateOct 4, 1954
Publication numberUS 2812740 A, US 2812740A, US-A-2812740, US2812740 A, US2812740A
InventorsWalter E Kirijan
Original AssigneeOwens Illinois Glass Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for wax coating scientific glassware
US 2812740 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

WQ E. KIRIJAN Nov. 12, 1957 APPARATUS FOR WAX COATING SCIENTIF IC GLASSWARE Filed Oct. 4, 1954 FM-L lfzfl a fi/LENTOB av (BY W z [z M w ATTZNEYS United atesPaIentDl --Wa lter EyKirijan, Winelapd; 'J., assignor tojj Owens- =-lllinois Glass cd ip ny t obiipoi'afioii ofifiliid t hereby providing'the desired graduations. lncide to performance of-thetlin tp, gthe articles are supported at" ,,o r chucks v vhich frequently score oi ch p the wax gapd exposeYglass surfaces which should not 'gli r ec tact ,t'he hydrofluoric acid,' for--thelobyiousi such would result in undesiredet'c hing pf the ep m h of the articles. 'In"the case of pipettes or similar-openended cylindrical articles, it is also necessary to seal the ends against entrance of the hydrofluoric acid to the interior, since otherwise undesired etching of the interior surfaces would also occur.

In consequence of the above it has been the practice, following the step of lining and numbering the wax coated tubes, to retouch the ends manually and by a separate operation, seal such ends and anchor them in a so-called nail board which serves as a support for a plurality of tubes while the free ends thereof are dipped into a liquid wax bath and later during immersion of the tubes in the etching bath of hydrofluoric acid.

An object of my invention is the provision of a novel method and apparatus for materially facilitating the socalled retouching operation and mechanizing the same, whereby the operators efiiciency and productive capacity may be very materially increased and a substantial saving in production costs effected.

It is also an object to provide a novel apparatus in which the conventional nail board support for the tubes, after having tubes loosely positioned thereon, is dipped into a bath of liquid wax to coat, seal, and anchor one end of the tubes in the nail board and then after the wax has set, inverting such board and mechanically lowering same to immerse the other end of the tubes in the wax bath to effect both sealing of the open end and coating of any scored portions.

Other objects will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

In the drawings:

Fig. l is a fragmentary sectional elevational view showing a nail board with pipettes positioned thereupon preparatory to immersion of the board into a body of liquid wax for the purpose of coating and sealing the lower ends and anchoring same in the nail board;

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 but showing the nail board inverted after anchoring the pipettes therein, the

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whose upper surface is exposed; an in a:12.t r sunpqrtingtt hulan la s ert el az itaml. a.

movable leveling y 14 nter:sledsosunp tzthea itbca in either of the positions shown in Figs. 1 and; 2 while ha. ve heent-cpatedtwlt ulc a-hl 1.; the z-.JI' mQY acci ntal y egencnalahandling.

.--thrionghoutathe.r tonchin hope at ean m-nnmersionaof tthe artei es;tinvthec qhi aqbat scfi t-zfihqnail board andarticles-are mouedgelativqtq,thg bath of liquidtwax.

-a st: at ehetetofc iz:t te e niastte ap t taabu .sarticles 13, ,prior,,to lacenrentn the he a s r ci qn a chucking. inntheqlininga and .numberi achine o/ r ilsli u aunc i-t :1 article113 intEig. 4.

fii r i; nail: board :12awh esuas r i:th e cl tanner-is,acid-anay mptisea res ansnl nniem e rs id onaonetsnrfacetwith alplur li mpfi ece il recesses are provided. These spikes or nails are intended to enter one end of the tubular articles 13 and support the latter more or less loosely until the space between the periphery of the article and the side Wall of the recess has been filled with wax 18 (as shown in Fig. 4). This wax filler 18 performs the two-fold function of anchoring the article 13 in the recess and sealing off the opening to the interior at this end so as to prevent entry of the etching acid to the interior of the article. It is understood of course that the diameter of each of the recesses 16 is slightly greater than that of the article to be supported thereon so as to provide adequate space to accommodate sufiicient wax to function as above explained. After one of these leveling trays has been filled with the tubular articles, pipettes, for example, it is placed in the leveling tray 14 as shown in Fig. 1, preparatory to being lowered into the wax bath 11.

This leveling tray 14 is an open rectangular metal frame suspended from a guide rod 19 which extends vertically upward through a pair of stationary guides 20 and at its upper end is connected to a cable 21 running over a pair of pulleys 22 and thence downwardly for connection to a counterweight 23. The leveling tray is provided at its lower end with a support 24 upon which the nail board may rest with the pipettes projecting upwardly therefrom. While in this position, the leveling tray is manually lowered sufliciently to completely submerge the nail board 12 in the bath of wax 11 and permit the wax to flow into the spaces about the lower ends of the pipettes and thereby fill the latter and anchor the articles to the nail board. Spaced above the support 24 is a pair of horizontally spaced angle iron rails 25 which are intended to support the filled nail board when the latter is in an inverted position, as shown in Fig. 2. It is understood that prior to the positioning of the nail board and pipettes (as shown in Fig. 2) the wax fillers 18 have set sufliciently to prevent premature displacement of the pipettes. The next step very obviously is to lower the leveling tray as illustrated in Fig. 2, so that the tip ends of the pipettes project into the liquid wax bath. .At the proper time the leveling tray is elevated and during such movement, the excess wax flows by gravity from the tip ends of the pipettes and that remaining on the pipettes recoats the lower end and simultaneously seals the opening. Cooling air directed against the tubes by means of a fan (not shown) may be utilized to accelerate setting of the wax. Following this operation the nail board with the pipettes thereon is removed from the leveling tray and transported to another location where at the convenience of the operator the pipettes, still supported by the nail board is immersed in the hydrofluoric acid bath for the purpose of etching the exposed surfaces of the glass articles. After such etching has been completed, the wax is removed in any preferred or conventional manner, leaving the exterior surface with only the clearly etched lines and numerals thereon.

Modifications may be resorted to within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In combination, a container for a bath of molten wax providing an exposed upper surface of such bath, a leveling tray positioned over said container and mounted for movement vertically relative to the latter, a carrier for wax coated glass tubes whose ends are to be dipped into the wax for additional coating and sealing, said carrier comprising a board provided on one side with a plurality of recesses and spikes individual to the recesses projecting axially outward from the latter, said spikes adapted to enter one end of such tubes and the tubes being loosely received in said recesses, a pair of vertically spaced supports on the leveling tray, said carrier adapted to be positioned upon the lower support with the tubes projecting upwardly during downward movement of the leveling tray into the bath of wax whereby the latter may 2,812,740. I, p r

how by gravity into the recesses to coat, seal, and anchor the lower ends of the tubes in said recesses, and the upper support being adapted to receive the carrier with the tubes suspended therefrom preparatory to dipping the free ends of such tubes into the molten wax bath.

2. In combination, a container for a bath of molten wax providing an exposed upper surface of such bath, a leveling tray positioned over said container and mounted for movement vertically relative to the latter, a carrier for wax-coated glass tubes whose ends are to be dipped into the wax for additional coating and sealing, said carrier comprising a board provided on one side with a plurality of recesses and spikes individual to the recesses projecting axially outward from the latter, said spikes adapted to enter one end of such tubes and the tubes being loosely received in said recesses, and means forming a part of the leveling tray for supporting the carrier in either of two positions in one of which the tubes project upwardly during downward movement of the leveling tray into the bath of wax whereby the latter may flow by gravity into the recesses to coat, seal, and anchor the lower ends of the tubes in said recesses while in the other position the tubes are suspended from said carrier preparatory to having their free lower ends dipped into the molten wax bath.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US15111 *Jun 10, 1856Howe manufacturing CompanyJapanning- pins
US599865 *Mar 1, 1898 Emanuel l
US709369 *Jan 31, 1902Sep 16, 1902Lewis H SondheimMethod of producing mouthpieces on cigarettes.
US968791 *Dec 16, 1908Aug 30, 1910Multi Seal Mfg CompanyMachine for capping bottles.
US1396458 *Oct 30, 1919Nov 8, 1921Ordine FredDevice for dipping artificial fruit
US1594375 *Aug 26, 1922Aug 3, 1926Western Cartridge CoArt of impregnating or waterproofing materials
US1638445 *Feb 25, 1926Aug 9, 1927John A PeaseApparatus for sealing bottle closures
US2210187 *Sep 20, 1938Aug 6, 1940Hazel Atlas Glass CoBottle stabilizer
US2567723 *Jul 9, 1949Sep 11, 1951Western Electric CoMethod of applying annular coatings to light bulbs
US2651284 *Jun 1, 1950Sep 8, 1953Zinn JrWax coating apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2949388 *Oct 11, 1957Aug 16, 1960Illinois Tool WorksMethod for coating modules with a heat curable protective coating material
US5213839 *Jul 26, 1991May 25, 1993Nissho CorporationMethod of applying silicone oil to injection needle and apparatus used therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/406, 118/500, 427/230, 422/914, 118/425
International ClassificationC03C17/32, B05C13/00, B01L3/14
Cooperative ClassificationC03C17/32, B01L3/5082, B05C13/00
European ClassificationB01L3/5082, C03C17/32, B05C13/00