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Publication numberUS2812947 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1957
Filing dateMay 15, 1956
Priority dateMay 15, 1956
Publication numberUS 2812947 A, US 2812947A, US-A-2812947, US2812947 A, US2812947A
InventorsRussell C Fatzinger, Eugene J Gowallis
Original AssigneeRussell C Fatzinger, Eugene J Gowallis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Animal target effigy unit
US 2812947 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 12, 1957 R. c. FATZINGER ET AL 2,812,947

ANIMAL TARGET EFFIGY UNIT Filed May 15, 1956 IN V EN TOR.

RUSSELLQFATZINGER. +3 EUGENE J.GOWALLlS FIGS.

ATT EY.

ANIMAL TARGET EFFIGY UNIT Russell C. Fatzinger and Eugene J. Gowallis,

Baltimore, Md.

Application May 15, 1956, Serial No. 585,095 6 Claims, 01. 273-1024 This invention relates to targets and more particularly those intended for arr-ow shooting practice or archery, and has for an object the provision of a new and improved animal target adapted to be shot at, from all angles.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved animal target unit for bow and arrow or archery practice, that will avoid, one or more of the disadvantages and limitations of the previous art.

A further object of this invention is to provide a new and improved structure in the targets intended for bow and arrow missile practice, and which will be capable of relatively long service for this purpose and capacity for withstanding attack from directions, all around its axis of placement.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a new and improved structure having the efiigy of an animal, in general contour and bodily form, offering a natural amount of resistance to the passage of an arrow missile propelled by a bow or other conventional mechanical driving implement against it. I

Still another object of the invention is to provide a new improved structure of simple and economical form, suitable for target use in which the missile is of an arrow form, and have the natural appearance of an animal selected for hunting purposes, and employing a method for constructing it economically, expeditiously and aesthetically.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent, as it is more fully outlined.

The targets for how and arrow or archery practice have evolved from the tree form; to the use of bales of hay stacked uprightly at a distance, ready to receive the shafts of the arrows and hold them; and finally to hollow casings having elastic walls designed to resiliently resist and obstruct the arrows. In all these instances the target unit presented an object that looked artificial and was limited in the directions in which it could be sighted and shot at. The practicing or prospective hunters were trained unnaturally and prevented from attaining the proper degree of skill and satisfactory results expected. Also sentiments of pleasure inherent to accomplishment of results, due to developed dexterity, were inhibited, since the objects shot at, were not at all like the animals in appearance, that the shooters anticipated hunting subsequently. All such individuals could do, was to endeavor to create a mental condition or imagination sufficient to impress themselves, that the artificial target was a real specific living object although of entirely different appearance.

In this invention the target unit is artificial, but its appearance from all angles is life-like and represents a specified animal, so that the prospective hunter is greatly persuaded that it is practically real. The target unit can be turned around to any angle with regard to the hunter, and thus enable him to shoot his arrows at the animal, in the same manner as he could if it were living and real. He can practice his shooting in a better way than 2,812,947 Patented Nov. 12, 1957 ice usual and derive a high degree, of the pleasure of accomplishment like that, that comes from real hunting with a bow and arrow.

For a greater appreciation of the invention and its objects, reference is made to the accompanying drawings, wherein a preferred for-m of the invention is illustrated. The drawings in conjunction with the following description, describe it in detail so its structure and manner of its use will become apparent'and imitatable.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of target deer unit embodying this invention;

Figure 2 is a sectional view through the body portion of the deer taken longitudinally, and shown with filling;

Figure 3 is a transverse section of the' body taken on line 3-3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a detail in perspective of the diaphragm with brackets attached; and

Figure 5 is a partial cross section of details of Fig. 2.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the drawings.

The target is constructed as follows: First a skeleton framework of wire or wood is made up in a rough outline of the animal to be simulated. On this skeleton, a body of modeling clay is plastered on, and worked into the form of the animal selected, until it is a reasonable facsimile. After the clay has dried out sufficiently and hardened, it is used as a pattern and pressed into wet sand to receive the impression. The pattern is then removed and plaster of paris is poured into the halfsections forming a mold. Then the plaster of paris molds or dies are removed from the sand when sufliciently hardened and laid out on a table ready to receive a coating of aluminum and shellac on is outside surface to make the surface smooth. The construction of the target is brought about, by applying a coating of oil to the exterior surfaces of the plaster mold to prevent the formed burlap from sticking to the mold surfaces. Two sheets of burlap or other suitable fabric is cut to suit each section of the mold. One sheet of the burlap 21 receives a heavy coating of linoleum cement such as BullDog paste made by Templar Oil Products Company, on one side and the second sheet of burlap 11 is pressed against the cement to stick them together. The double sheet of burlap 11 and 21 while still wet is pressed against the plaster mold to take its shape and the same operation is repeated from the other half, the edges are then trimmed to align with the edges of the plaster molds. The two halves are then placed in an oven and baked at 300 F. for about 15 minutes. The shapes are then removed from the plaster molds and allowed to air dry for 3 to 5 days, at which time they will have attained their maximum hardness. The shapes are relatively light and exteriorly portrays the animal patterned on the plaster mold. Burlap strips or ribbons 13 are cemented to a longitudinal diaphragm 14 of uncured rubber, otherwise known as camel back used in the tire retreading industry. The diaphragm is preferably 3%" thick and cut to the symmetry of the animal it is to represent, and forms a barrier across the middle longitudinal area of the casing to resiliently impede the passage of the arrow missiles, shot into the target, and prevents the arrows from passing through the target. The ribbon 13 being relatively stiff, holds the diaphragm l4 resiliently taut at its periphery. Channel shaped brackets 15 of the same material as the diaphragms are cemented transversely to the diaphragm A- and to the walls of the casing 12 and offer stiffened resistance to the longitudinal passage of the arrow through the animal, from the front or rear. The burlap tape or ribbon i3 is cemented to the edge of one of the shells with rubber cement and a coating of rubber cement is applied to the edge of the other shell and the two halves are cemented together to form the animal. Ears 20 are then made of rubber and covered with burlap which extends about 1%" at the base and the extension is cemented to the head of the animal. Rubber cement is preferably used in fastening the diaphragms, brackets and shell together. The legs 16 of the animal are included as off shoots of the shells and are provided with hoofs 17. The animal is preferably mounted on a base board 18 designed as a stable yet movable foundation for the manikin. Before painting, all parts assembled with rubber cement are coated with linoleum cement after assembly to. prevent the paint spirits from softening and loosening the assembled parts.

The rubber cement used and found to meet all requirements is 3M made by Minnesota Mining & Mfg. Co.

The outer surface of the animal is painted or sprayed with colors similar to their natural coloring and the different areas of the body may be marked off or colored as shown in the drawing by varying the shading and marked A, B, C, D, and E, values are given to these different areas for competitive purposes and evaluate the skill and judgement of the archers who shoot at the target unit.

For general purposes, the make-up of' the animal can be arranged without filling 22 inside but where such filling is desirable and the matter of lightness is inconsequential, the addition of material 22 like saw-dust, straw, cotton wool, fiberglass and fluffy plastics can be introduced into the body formed by the closed shells. Doing so, provides additional resistance to the missiles. The material is loosely packed in, so it will not drastically interfere with the tensioning and flexing of the diaphragm and brackets when hit by the missiles.

There is also the training afforded the prospective hunter, for selective shooting at certain parts of the anatomy for humane and other reasons. This he can be trained to do, by the familiarity derived from his shots and their examinations afterwards with respect to the parts sought to be hit. Eyes 19, are derived from colored marbles cemented in place, and surrounded by lines painted on to represent the ocular area.

The invention has several unusual but important characteristics. Among these items are the availability for use of the target unit for shooting practice at any angle in the 360 around it in a horizontal plane. The missile used in archery, namely the arrow, can be stopped by the diaphragm if propelled at the side, and by the channel resilient brackets if sent in from the front or rear direction. The burlap-cement construction offers a resistance about equal to that of the hide of an animal and will cover up holes left by the arrow. The practice life of the target unit is relatively long as it will withstand considerable use. The structure made as explained, is very economical and its relative lightness permits it to be transported readily and inexpensively.

While but one general form of the invention is shown in the drawings and described in the specification, it is not desired to limit this application for patent to this particular form as it is appreciated that other forms of construction could be made that would use the same principles and come within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed is:

l. A target for archery practice comprising in combination, a pair of half-shells contoured to the form of an animal and cemented together to form the hollow body of the animal, said shells having legs extended therefrom, a base board fastened to said legs forming a foundation for the animal to hold it in a stable position on the ground, a diaphragm means attached to the halfshells and extended longitudinally in the body and forming a barrier dividing the interior into plural chambers and forming an obstruction to arrow missiles used in said practice when propelled through the walls of said half-shells and retaining the missiles projecting from the body, said diaphragm being of relatively toughened resilient material, and anchored to the said walls at its periphery to afford means for absorbing the energy in the said missiles, said half-shells being constructed of flexible fabric reinforced and embedded with linoleum cement dried out to rigidity, said resilient material being of rubber-like consistency and anchored by cementing in place.

2. A target for archery practice comprising in combination, a pair of half-shells contoured to the form of an animal and cemented together to form the hollow body of the animal, said shells having legs extended therefrom, a base board fastened to said legs forming a foundation for the animal to hold it in a stable position on the ground, a diaphragm means attached to the halfshells and extended longitudinally in the body and forming a barrier dividing the interior into plural chambers and forming an obstruction to arrow missiles used in said practice when propelled through the walls of said half-shells and retaining the missiles projecting from the body, said diaphragm being of relatively toughened resilient material, and anchored to the said walls at its periphery to afford means for absorbing the energy in the said missiles, said half-shells being constructed of flexible fabric reinforced and embedded with linoleum cement dried out to rigidity, said resilient material being of rubber-like consistency and anchored by cementing in place, and channel brackets of the same resilient material extending from the side surface of the diaphragm to the walls of the half-shells in a transverse plane to obstruct the passage of said missiles from the front and rear.

3. A target for archery practice comprising in combination, a. pair of half-shells contoured to the form of an animal and cemented together to form the hollow body of the animal, said shells having legs extended therefrom, a base board fastened to said legs forming a foundation for the animal to hold it in a stable position on the ground, a diaphragm means attached to the half-shells and extended longitudinally in the body and forming a barrier dividing the interior into plural chambers and forming an obstruction to arrow missiles used in said practice when propelled through the walls of said halfshells and retaining the missiles projecting from the body, said diaphragm being of relatively toughened resilient material, and anchored to the said walls at its periphery to afford means for absorbing the energy in the said missiles, said half-shells being constructed of flexible fabric reinforced and embedded with linoleum cement dried out to rigidity, said resilient material being of rubber-like consistency and anchored by cementing in place, channel brackets of the same resilient material extending from the side surface of the diaphragm to the walls of the half-shells in a transverse plane to obstruct the passage of said missiles from the front and rear, and ribbons cemented in place to the half-shells to keep them aligned and tight.

4. A target for archery practice comprising in combination, a pair of half-shells contoured to the form of an animal and cemented together to form the hollow body of the animal, said shells having legs extended therefrom, a base board fastened to said legs forming a foundation for the animal to hold it in a stable position on the ground, a diaphragm means attached to the halfshells and extended longitudinally in the body and forming a barrier dividing the interior into plural chambers and forming an obstruction to arrow missiles used in said practice when propelled through the walls of said half-shells and retaining the missiles projecting from the body, said diaphragm being of relatively toughened re silient material, and anchored to the said walls at its periphery to afford means for absorbing the energy in the said missiles, said half-shells being constructed of flexible fabric reinforced and embedded with linoleum cement dried out to rigidity, said resilient material being of rubber-like consistency and anchored by cementing in place, channel brackets of the same resilient material extending from the side surface of the diaphragm to the Walls of the half-shells in a transverse plane to obstruct the passage of said missiles from the front and rear, ribbons cemented in place to the half-shells to keep them aligned and tight, and markings on the exterior of the animal for designating specific areas segregated for different evaluations of strikes by said missiles.

5. A target for archery practice comprising in combination, a pair of half-shells contoured to the form of an animal and cemented together to form the hollow body of the animal, said shells having legs extended therefrom, a base board fastened to said legs forming a foundation for the animal to hold it in a stable position on the ground, a diaphragm means attached to the half-shells and extended longitudinally in the body and forming a barrier dividing the interior into plural chambers and forming an obstruction to arrow missiles used in said practice when propelled through the walls of said half-shells and retaining the mis siles projecting from the body, said diaphragm being of relatively toughened resilient material, and anchored to the said walls at its periphery to afford means for absorbing the energy in the said missiles, said half-shells being constructed of flexible fabric reinforced and embedded with linoleum cement dried out. to rigidity, said resilient material being of rubberlike consistency and anchored by cementing in place, channel brackets of the same resilient material extending from the side surface of the diaphragm to the walls of the half-shells in a transverse plane to obstruct the passage of said missiles from the front and rear, ribbons cemented in place to the half-shells to keep them aligned and tight, markings on the exterior of the animal for designating specific areas segregated for different evaluations of strikes by said missiles, said flexible .fabric being in laminated form soaked in said cement to form a homogeneous and rigid mass when dried out.

6. A target for archery practice comprising in combination, a pair of half-shells contoured to the form of an animal and cemented together to form the hollow body of the animal, said shells having legs extended therefrom, a base board fastened to said legs forming a foundation for the animal to hold it in a stable position on the ground, a diaphragm means attached to the half-shells and extended longitudinally in the body and forming a barrier dividing the interior into plural chambers when propelled through the walls of said half-shells and retaining the missiles projecting from the body, said diaphragm being of relatively toughened resilient material, and anchored to the said Walls at its periphery to afford means for absorbing the energy in the said missiles, said half-shells being constructed of flexible fabric reinforced and embedded with linoleum cement dried out to rigidity, said resilient material being of rubber-like consistency and anchored by cementing in place, channel brackets of the same resilient material extending from the side surface of the diaphragm to the walls of the half-shells in a transverse plane to obstruct the passage of said missiles from the front and rear, ribbons cemented in place to the half-shells to keep them aligned and tight, markings on the exterior of the animal for designating specific areas segregated for different evaluations of strikes by said missiles, said flexible fabric be ing in laminated form soaked in said cement to form a homogeneous and rigid mass when dried out, and said ribbons being also provided for attaching the diaphragm to the said shells.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 247,858 Thoni Oct. 4, 1881 365,979 Emerick July 5, 1887 412,109 Lindner Oct. 1, 1889 2,710,754 Varney' June 14, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US247858 *Aug 15, 1881Oct 4, 1881 Roundabout
US365979 *Jul 5, 1887 Display-horse
US412109 *Dec 29, 1888Oct 1, 1889 Moritz lindner
US2710754 *Aug 24, 1951Jun 14, 1955Rey VarneyLight actuated target apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3163418 *Jan 18, 1963Dec 29, 1964Myers Whedon RaySimulated animal target for archers
US4082280 *Dec 3, 1975Apr 4, 1978Lang Otis CThree-dimensional, layered, self sealing target
US4203600 *Dec 30, 1977May 20, 1980Brown Stephen DTarget with removable score sheet
US4235444 *Sep 11, 1978Nov 25, 1980Meyer Leonard STarget particularly for archery
US4445693 *Sep 24, 1981May 1, 1984Laminations CorporationBullet trap
US4477082 *Dec 6, 1982Oct 16, 1984Mckenzie Larry GArchery target with replacable target segment
US4565376 *Mar 28, 1985Jan 21, 1986Lionel CrollAnimal simulating three dimensional archery target and method of manufacture
US4695060 *May 2, 1986Sep 22, 1987Pilgrim J ColeReversible archery target
US5308084 *Mar 1, 1993May 3, 1994Morrell Dale AThree-dimensional archery target
US5498001 *Mar 10, 1993Mar 12, 1996Franks; Johnny D.Archery target
US5503403 *Mar 17, 1994Apr 2, 1996Morrell; Dale A.Three-dimensional archery target
US6254100May 18, 1999Jul 3, 2001Rinehart Family CompanyArchery target with replaceable target section
US7380796Jul 5, 2006Jun 3, 2008Hinton Tab D3-D portable impulse target for archery
US7389606 *Mar 26, 2007Jun 24, 2008Mcleod J DouglasHunting decoy
US7712743 *Feb 27, 2008May 11, 2010Thomas John MillerThree-dimensional reactionary turkey target
US8333385Sep 30, 2010Dec 18, 2012J & L Targets, Inc.Archery target with three dimensional target area
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/404, 446/369, D22/113, D11/158
International ClassificationF41J3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41J3/0004
European ClassificationF41J3/00A