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Publication numberUS2813401 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1957
Filing dateDec 13, 1954
Priority dateDec 13, 1954
Publication numberUS 2813401 A, US 2813401A, US-A-2813401, US2813401 A, US2813401A
InventorsSmith Peter A
Original AssigneeFisher Governor Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Filler valve construction
US 2813401 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov; 19, 1957 P. A. SMITH FILLER VALVE CONSTRUCTION Filed Dec. 15, 1954 xii-=55:

ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent FILLER VALVE CONSTRUCTION Peter A. Smith, Marshalltown, Iowa, assignor to Fisher Governor Company, Marshalltown, Iowa, :1 corporation of Iowa Application December 13, 1954, Serial No. 474,897

7 Claims. (Cl. 62-1) This invention relates generally to a filler valve construction, and more particularly to such devices intended for use in liquefied petroleum gas storage and dispensing systems.

Conventional type storage containers commonly known in the liquefied petroleum gas industry generally employ a filler valve in order to replenish the fuel supply within the container and to withdraw the contents of the container under emergency conditions. Such filler valves may comprise individual fittings, or may be valve components of a unitary multiple valved head assembly. During normal filling operations, the risk of excessive vapor pressure build-up within the storage container is conventionally avoided by withdrawing vapor from the container through an outlet means provided with a regulatable vapor return valve. A volume of vapor approximately equal to the volume of replenishing liquid introduced into the container may thereby be withdrawn during the filling operation. conventionally, the filler valves known to the prior art utilize a dip pipe which extends downwardly from the filler valve to a point closely adjacent the bottom of the tank. In this manner, the replenishing supply of liquid is introduced at the bottom of the tank to permit a smooth and non-turbulent rise in the container liquid level. The increasing pressure of the vapor space above the rising liquid level is relieved by the vapor return means.

The use of a vapor return system in filling operations as described above, has been found to be undesirable in several ways. The handling of liquid petroleum vapor always constitutes a fire and explosion hazard, and the less flow handling necessitated by any fuel system, the less will be the hazards presented. The use of a vapor return system also necessarily requires careful attendance and manual regulation, resulting in an expenditure of time and labor. From the practical standpoint of minimizing waste, the vapor return system is also undesirable because of the difiiculty in effecting accurate metering of the vapor withdrawn and conversion into terms of corresponding liquid volume so that the consumerpurchaser may receive an appropriate price allowance for the vapor removed. It will be apparent, therefore,

that the provision of filling means which eliminates the necessity for a vapor return system will result in improved efiiciency, reduction in cost, and minimization of physical hazards.

I have found that by introducing the highly volatile liquid petroleum into the container directly into the vapor space, rather than through the conventional dip pipe, excessive pressure build-up within the tank can be substantially eliminated. Although methods have been devised in which the outlet of the filler valve is fitted with a device which produces a difiuse or spraylike flow pattern, such arrangements have not also provided effective liquid withdrawal by means of a dip pipe.

The diifusion of incoming liquid into the vapor space in a spray pattern results in a refrigerating etfect or temperature drop within the vapor space because of the expansion of the liquid as it discharges from the filler valve outlet. This cooling effect, together with the consequent lowering of vapor pressure within the container, compensates for the tendency for pressure build-up due to the volume of liquid being introduced into the container. I have found that the compensating effect is sufficient to permit filling operations to he completed entirely without the use of any vapor return system.

It is a primary object of the present invention, therefore, to provide a unitary filler valve construction for introducing a replenishing supply of liquid petroleum gas into the vapor space of a storage container having dip pipe means for emergency liquid removal.

it is another object of this invention to provide a filler valve construction having two-directional flow control means for, alternatively, regulating and directing an incoming supply of liquid into the vapor space of a storage container, while preventing downward flow through an operatively associated dip pipe, and regulating and directing an upward flow of liquid during emergency eduction, while preventing outward flow of such liquid into the vapor space of the container.

It is a further object to provide a filler valve assembly having two-directional fiow control means comprising a slidably reciprocable valve plug normally biased in a first position for permitting upward outgoing flow from a dip pipe through the assembly, wherein said valve plug is movable by the force of a downward replenishing flow of liquid to a second position for preventing said outgoing flow and for permitting the incoming flow to be directed into the vapor zone of an operatively associated storage container. p

It is still another object to provide a filler valve assembly having two-directional flow control means comprising a plurality of pivotally mounted flapper members each normally biased in a first position for effecting closure of a corresponding plurality of filling ports and permitting upward outgoing flow from a dip pipe through the assembly, wherein said flapper members are pivoted by the force of a downward replenishing flow of liquid to a second position of collective cooperation providing a valve closure for preventing said outgoing flow and for permitting the incoming flow to be directed into the vapor zone of an operatively associated storage container.

Further objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds and the features of novelty which characterize this invention will be pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming part of this specification.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 of the drawing is a side elevational view, partly broken away and in cross section, showing a liquid petroleum container provided with a filler valve assembly constructed in accordance with the present invention;

Figure 2 is a vertical fragmentary cross sectional view of a first embodiment of a filler valve constructed in accordance with the present invention;

Figure 3 is a vertical cross sectional view, similar to Figure 2, showing a second embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 4 is a vertical cross sectional view of the valve construction shown in Figure 3, illustrating the control valving elements in another position of flow control operation;

Figure 5 is a horizontal cross sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line 5-5 on Figure 4;

Figure 6 is a perspective view of one of the Valvecontrol elements of the construction shown in Figures 3-5; and

Figure 7 is a perspective view of another of the valve control elements of the construction shown in Figures 3-5.

Referring now more particularly to Figure 1 of the drawing, I have indicated generally at a conventional storage and dispensing container of the type commonly used by the liquefied petroleum gas industry. The container 10 serves to enclose a quantity of liquid petroleum gas 12 having a maximum liquid level 14. The liquid level 14 is spaced below the top of the tank to define a vapor zone 16. A filler valve employing the features of the present invention and having liquid withdrawal means is indicated generally at in operatively mounted position on the container li).

In Figure 2 of the drawing, I have illustrated a first embodiment of the present invention. The spray filling portion of the construction shown is formed as; an integral extension of a main filler valve housing 22. The housing 22 is of hollow form providing a vertically-elongated openended body. It will be understood, of course, that the spray filling portion of the construction may be formed as a separate attachment for screw threaded connection .to a conventional filler valve. The main housing 22 is [adapted to be mounted, as indicated at 24 in Figure 1, through the top wallof the storage container 10. A conventional back-check or excess-flow check valve 26 is provided in the usual manner of filler valve constructions. .The walls of the main housing 22 below the back-check valve 26 are provided with a plurality of circumferentially spaced filling ports 28, extending laterally therethrough for communication with the vapor zone 16, as clearly shown in Figure 1 suitable adaptor 30 is provided at the lower end of the main housing 22 and screw threaded at 32 for the attachment of a conventional dip pipe 34. In this manner, the filler valve construction provides, as a unitary portion thereof, suitable dip pipe means for effective liquid withdrawal. The adaptor 30 is formed with an internal shoulder 36 providing an annular abutment surface.

An upwardly open valve plug 38 is mounted within the housing 22 for vertical reciprocating movement. The plug 38 is dimensioned so as to provide a relatively large diameter side wall 40 at its upper end for sliding cooperation with the inner surface'of the housing 22. The plug is constricted at its lower end to provide a relatively small diameter side wall 42 in spaced relation to the inner side wall .of the housing 22. The small diameter lower portion of the plug 38 results in a shoulder 44 providing an annular abutment surface. The lower end of the plug 38 provides a closed bottom Wall 46 adapted to cooperate with the shoulder 36 of the adaptor 30 in the manner of. a valve and valve seat. The lower side wall 42 of the plug 38 is provided with a plurality of circumferentially spaced flow ports 48 providing communication between the interior of the plug and the space between the side wall 42 and the main housing 22.

A biasing element in the form of a compression spring .50 seats at its lower end against the shoulder 36 and at its upper end against the shoulder 44 to normally bias the plug 38 in an upward direction. A snap ring 52 carried by the inner surface of the housing 22 cooperates with the .upper end of the plug 38 to determine its upper limiting position. Under no-flow conditions, the various parts are disposed relative to each other as shown in Figure 2 of the drawing. a

The shoulder 36 serves to define an eduction flow 'port 54 centrally therethrough. The bottom wall 46 of the plug 38 serves as a valve element adapted to seat on the annular surface provided by the shoulder 36 to effect a closure of the flow port 54-. In its upwardly biased position, as shown in Figure 2, the upper side wall 40 of the valve plug38 serves to effect closure of the filling ports 28. It will be apparent that upward flow may occur through the dip pipe 34, eduction flow port 54, valve plug ports 48, valve plug 38, and housing 22.

' During a filling operation, the force of an incoming flow of liquid downwardly through the housing 22 will serve to effect a downward sliding movement of the valve plug 38 against the bias of the spring 50. In this manner, the bottom wall 46 will seat against the shoulder 36 to prevent flow communication through the eduction port 54, while at the same time exposing the filling ports 28 to permit free flow of incoming liquid laterally outwardly therethrough. In this way, the replenishing supply of liquid may be sprayed outwardly through the filling ports 28 into the vapor zone 16, and fiow through the dip pipe 34 will at the same time be precluded.

In Figures 3 through 7 of the drawing, I have shown a modified embodiment of the present invention, utilizing a different form of valving arrangement. I have indicated the hollow main housing of the fillter valve at 50, and the conventional back-check or excess-flow check valve at 52. In this embodiment, the spray filling portion of the construction is illustrated as a saparate attachment 54 adapted to be secured to the main housing 50, as indicated by screw threading at 56. The spray filling attachment 54 provides a hollow housing in the form of an openended body having a plurality of circumferentially spaced filling ports 58 registering with the vapor zone 16 of an operatively associated storage container in the manner of Figure l.

The lower end of the spray attachment housing 54 is screw threaded at 60 for attachment of a dip pipe 62. The spray attachment housing 54 is internally formed with a shoulder 64 defining an annular surface defining a flow port 66 extending centrally therethrough.

A two-directional flow control valve, having substantially the same functional utility as the embodiment of Figure 2, is provided in the form of two pairs of flapper elements 68 and 70. Each of the flappers comprises a filling port valve portion 72 and an eduction valve component portion 74. Two pairs of pivot shafts 76 and 78 are disposed one pair above the other for pivotal mounting of the pairs of flappers 68 and 70 within the spray attachment housing 54.

As best seen in Figures 6 and 7, the flappers are formed with an angular bend at the intersection of the respective portions 72 and 7 4. The angle bends or intersections are formed with respective pairs of up-bends 8'0 and 82. A center down-bend or angle-forming space 84 is provided between the pairs of up-bends and 82. In this manner the'flappers 68 (Fig. 6) and the flappers 70 (Fig. 7) form a guide means at the angular bend or intersection of the portions 72 and 74 which is adapted to receive the respective pivot shafts 76 and 78 therethrough. The flappers are mounted in pairs one above the other in order to effect a compact arrangement with a minimum of space. In order to compensate for the height difference between the respective pairs of flappers, the upper pair 70 is formed with an extension flange portion 86 at the angular bend or intersection between the portions 72 and 74. This added portion, as compared to flapper 68, serves to compensate for the difference in horizontal position of the respective pairs of flappers 68 and 70.

A plurality of springs 88 are provided to normally bias the flapper elements in the positions shown in Figure 4 of the drawing, wherein the filling port valve portions 72 serve to effect closure of the spray filling ports 58. The upwardly inclined eduction valve portions 74 are substantially spaced from each other, when positioned as shown for filling port closure, so as to provide an up-flow space 90 therebetween. It will be apparent that upward eduction flow of liquid through the dip pipe 62 may be effected through the up-flo'w space 90 without outward flow through the closed filling ports 58.

During filling operations, the incoming supply of liquid will exert a force against the bias of the springs 88 serving to pivot the flappers to the positions shown in Figure 3 of the drawing, wherein the component portions 74 cooperate to effect a valve closure of the eduction flow port 66, while freely permitting laterally-outward flow of the incoming liquid through the filling ports 58 into the vapor zone 16.

I claim:

1. In a liquid petroleum gas dispensing installation of the type including a tank and a filler valve mounted in the top wall thereof, the combination with said filler valve of flow directing means comprising an open-ended vertically-elongated body of hollow form having its upper end in flow communication with said filler valve and having its lower end adapted to communicate with a dip pipe, means forming a generally horizontal valve seat intermediate the ends of said body and providing an eduction passageway therethrough, said body being formed with a laterally extending filling port above said valve seat, and control valve means mounted within said body and movable between operative positions for alternately closing said eduction passageway and said filling port, said control means comprising a plurality of pivotally mounted flapper members each movable between a first position for efiecting closure of a corresponding plurality of filling ports and a second position for collectively cooperating with one another to provide a closure for said eduction passageway.

2. In a liquid petroleum gas dispensing installation of the type including a tank and a filler valve mounted in the top wall thereof, the combination with said filler valve of flow directing means comprising an open-ended vertically-elongated body of hollow form having its upper end in flow communication with said filler valve and having its lower end adapted to communicate with a dip pipe, means forming a generally horizontal valve seat intermediate the ends of said body and providing an eduction passageway therethrough, said body being formed with a laterally extending filling port above said valve seat, control valve means mounted within said body and movable between operative positions for alternately closing said eduction passageway and said filling port, said control means comprising a plurality of pivotally mounted flapper members each movable between a first position for effecting closure of a corresponding plurality of filling ports and a second position for collectively cooperating with one another to provide a closure for said eduction passageway, and spring means serving to normally bias said flapper members in said first positions for closing said filling ports while permitting flow through said eduction passageway, the force of incoming fluid admitted to the top of said body serving to pivot said flapper members downwardly against said spring bias to said second positions for closing said eduction passageway while permitting flow through said filling ports.

3. In combination with a tank for storing liquefied gas under pressure, a filler valve mounted at an opening in the tank and a flow directing device for spray filling and liquid eduction of said tank, said device comprising an open-ended vertically elongated body of hollow form having its upper end in flow communication with said filler valve and defining an eduction passageway, a dip pipe extending to a point adjacent the bottom of said tank and being connected to said body in flow communication with said eduction passageway, said body having a spray filling port extending laterally therethrough above said eduction passageway in communication therewith, said spray port communicating with the interior of the tank near the top thereof, fiow control means comprising a slidable member mounted within said body for relative axial movement between positions for alternately closing and opening said spray port, and means for placing said clip pipe in communication with said filler valve through said eduction passageway including a valve element and a valve seat element operative within said body for relative opening movement in the direction of outgoing flow from said dip pipe to said filler valve, said slidable memher being movable in response to incoming flow to its port opening position thereby to direct the incoming flow laterally outwardly through said spray port into said tank and being movable in response to outgoing flow from said dip pipe through said eduction passageway to its port closing position thereby to permit eduction flow upwardly through said body and filler valve.

4. In combination with a tank for storing liquefied gas under pressure, a filler valve mounted at an opening in the tank and a flow directing device for spray filling and liquid eduction of said tank, said device comprising an open-ended vertically elongated body of hollow form having its upper end in flow communication with said filler valve and defining an eduction passageway, a dip pipe extending to a point adjacent the bottom of said tank and being connected to said body in flow communication with said eduction passageway, said body having 'a spray filling port extending laterally therethrough above said eduction passageway in communication therewith, said spray port communicating with the interior of the tank near the top thereof, flow control means comprising a slidable member mounted Within said body for relative axial movement between positions for alternately closing and opening said spray port, biasing means serving to normally position said slidable member in its port closing position, and means for placing said dip pipe in communication with said filler valve through said eduction passageway including a valve element and a valve seat element operative within said body for relative opening P movement in the direction of outgoing flow from said dip pipe to said filler valve, said slidable member being movable against said biasing means in response to incoming flow to its port opening position thereby to direct the incoming flow laterally outwardly through said spray port into said tank and being movable with said biasing means and in response to outgoing flow from said dip pipe through said eduction passageway to its port closing position thereby to permit eduction flow upwardly through said body and filler valve.

5. In combination with a tank for storing liquefied gas under pressure, a filler valve mounted at an opening in the tank and a flow directing device for spray filling and liquid eduction of said tank, said device comprising an open-ended vertically elongated body of hollow form having its upper end in flow communication with said filler valve and defining an eduction passageway, a dip pipe extending to a point adjacent the bottom of said tank and being connected to said body in flow communication with said eduction passageway, said body having a spray filling port extending laterally therethrough above said eduction passageway in communication therewith, said spray port communicating with the interior of the tank near the top thereof, and flow control means comprising a generally hollow plug member slidably mounted within said body for relative axial movement between positions for alternately closing and opening said spray port, check means for placing said dip pipe in communication with said filler valve through said eduction passageway including an integral wall portion of said plug member serving as a valve element, an internal wall portion of said body erving as a valve seat element, and a flow aperture in said plug member above its valve element portion, said plug member being movable in response to incoming flow to both its filling port opening position and its check means closing position to thereby direct the incoming flow laterally outwardly through said spray port into said tank while preventing downward flow through said check means into said clip pipe, and said plug member being movable in response to outgoing flow from said dip pipe through said eduction passageway to both its filling port closing position and its check means opening position to thereby permit eduction flow upwardly through said body and filler valve.

6. The combination of claim 5, wherein biasing means is provided to normally position said plug member under no-flow conditions in its filling port closing and check means opening positions.

7. in combination with a tank for storing liquefied gas under pressure, a filler valve mounted at an opening in the tank and a flow directing device for spray filling and liquid eduction of said tank, said device comprising 7 7 an open-ended vertically elongated body of hollow form having its upper end in flow communication with said filler valve and defining an eduction passageway, a dip pipe extending to a point adjacent the bottom of said tank and being connected to said body in flow communication with said eduction passageway, said body having a spray filling port extending laterally therethrough above said eduction passageway in communication therewith, said spray port communicating with the interior of the tank near the top thereof, flow control means comprising a flapper member pivotally mounted within said body for movement between positions for alternately closing and opening said spray port, and means for placing said dip pipe in communication with said filler valve through said eduction passageway including a valve seat element adapted to cooperate with said flapper member when in its port opening position, said flapper member being 8 movable in response to incoming flow to its portopening position thereby to dire'ct the incoming. flow laterally outwardly through said spray put into said tank and seat against said valve seat element thereby to close said eduction passageway, and being movable in response to outgoing flow from said dip pipe through said eductionpassageway to its p'ort closing position thereby to unseat from said valve seat element and permit eduction" flow upwardly through said body and filler valve.

References Cited iri the tile of this patent UNITED sTATEs PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2161813 *Jan 29, 1937Jun 13, 1939John B Plerce FoundationAutomatic air valve with swing check and back pressure control
US2361865 *Jan 18, 1941Oct 31, 1944Bastian Biessing CoLiquefied petroleum gas system
US2434799 *Nov 10, 1943Jan 20, 1948Eyre Smelting Company LtdViscosity-responsive valve
US2556829 *Mar 20, 1945Jun 12, 1951Bendix Aviat CorpFluid regulator
US2710621 *Jan 6, 1954Jun 14, 1955Sloan Valve CoVacuum breakers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2964918 *Mar 11, 1957Dec 20, 1960Union Carbide CorpMethod and apparatus for dispensing gas material
US3018804 *Feb 16, 1959Jan 30, 1962Geo I Meyer Mfg CompanyFiller valves for pulp drinks or the like
US3402735 *Sep 23, 1965Sep 24, 1968W A Kates CompanyFlow regulating apparatus
US5165442 *Feb 25, 1991Nov 24, 1992Grindley John RDifferential valve
US5232016 *Sep 30, 1992Aug 3, 1993Chun Tseng LVacuum storage container
US6237629 *Jun 24, 1999May 29, 2001Clyde H. ZelchApparatus for positive water retention and circulation in storage tanks
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/109, 141/364, 62/47.1, 62/50.7, 141/286, 137/527, 137/493.7, 137/115.12, 137/512.3, 62/52.1
International ClassificationF17B1/12, F16K15/03, F16K15/02, F17B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF16K15/035, F17B1/12
European ClassificationF17B1/12, F16K15/03D