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Publication numberUS2813526 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1957
Filing dateJun 29, 1956
Priority dateJun 29, 1956
Publication numberUS 2813526 A, US 2813526A, US-A-2813526, US2813526 A, US2813526A
InventorsMilford H Beebe
Original AssigneeMilford H Beebe
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Orthopedic appliance
US 2813526 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nqv. 19, 1957 M. H. BEEBE 2,313,526

ORTI-IOlEDIC APPLIANCE Filed June 29, 1956 IN V EN TOR.

MILFORD H. BEEBE ATTORNEYS United States Patent 2,813,526 ORTHOPEDIC APPLIANCE Milford H. Beebe, Palm Springs, Calif.

Application June 29, 1956, Serial No. 594,942

2 Claims. (Cl. 128-78) This invention relates generally to orthopedic appliances and is more particularly concerned with a novel sacroiliac appliance or orthopedic brace for providing support to joints between the sacrum or lower spine and the ilia or hip or haunch bones.

During walking, the ilia which are intermediately pivoted at the sacroiliac joint to the sacrum incorporate a rearwardly pivotal movement at their upper ends relative to the spine or sacrum of the body. In a malfunctioning sacroiliac joint the upper end portions of the ilia have a tendency to over pivot or move excessively relative to the sacrum thus causing a back ache and general discomfort. The so called over pivoting may be defined as a sacroiliac slip encompassing excessive rearward movement of the ilia relative to a normal functioning sacroiliac joint.

A primary object of invention is to provide a novel orthopedic appliance which may be readily disposed about the lower torso portion of a patient including means for restraining excessive movement of the ilia relative to the sacrum thus compensating for a sacroiliac slip.

A more specific object of invention in conformance with that set forth is to provide a novel orthopedic appliance including an abdominal pad detachably connected to one end of substantially rigid rod elements which are disposed on opposite sides of the hip bones of a wearer of the appliance, opposite ends of the rods being connected to a sacroiliac pad which overlies the upper portion of the two ilia, the abdominal and sacroiliac pads being of a resilient material wherein normal functioning of the sacroiliac joint is permitted, and excessive movement at the sacroiliac joint i. e. during a sacroiliac slip, is restrained, thus permitting normal motivation of a wearer of the appliance and eliminating fatigue and discomfort.

Further objects and advantages in conformance with that set forth reside in the specific structural details of the cooperating structure of the novel orthopedic appliance.

And yet a still further object of invention in conformance with that set forth resides in a novel orthopedic appliance of the character involved which is readily and economically manufactured, easily used and applied, and highly satisfactory, utilitarian and acceptable for the purpose intended.

These together with other objects and advantages which will subsequently become apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawing forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a human body, showing in phantom lines a portion of the spine, sacrum, ilium, and the approximate location of the sacroiliac joint, further showing the novel orthopedic appliance when disposed in a position to be worn for treating a sacroiliac slip;

Figure 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken substantially on line 2-2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is an exploded perspective view of the novel orthopedic appliance, portions being broken away and shown in section for clarity;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary enlarged sectional view taken substantially on line 44 of Figure 3; and

Figure 5 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken substantially on line 55 of Figure 3.

Referring to the drawing in detail, a fragmentary portion of a human body is indicated generally at 10 said body incorporating an abdominal portion 12, hip portion 14, said hip portion incorporating the hip bone or ilia 16, the body including the lower spinal portion 18 terminating in the sacrum 20, the ilia being connected to the sacrum at the sacroiliac joint indicated at 22. During walking, for example, the upper end portion 24 of the ilia will tend to move rearwardly as indicated by the direction arrow in Figure 1, and excessive rearward movement about the sacroiliac joint 22 may be defined as a sacroiliac slip, the condition which the novel orthopedic appliance 26 is intended to overcome.

The orthopedic appliance 26 comprises an. abdominal pad 28, sacroiliac pad 30 and a pair of semi-rigid substantially arcuate connecting bars or rods 34 and 36, capable of being bent or molded to conform to different body shapes of individuals.

The abdominal pad 28 is constructed of a semi-rigid rubber material, see Figure 3, for example, incorporating therein at opposite ends juxtaposed longitudinally extending plate members 38 and 40 imbedded in the body member 42 comprising the abdominal pad, said plate members incorporating longitudinally extending overlying groove portions 44 and 46 defining a passage portion in communication with a longitudinally extending bore portion 48 opening into the ends of the abdominal pad 28. The groove portions 44 and 46 incorporate therein a plurality of longitudinally spaced elongated slot portions 50 for receiving therein the hook end portions 52 of the rods 34 and 36, thus detachably connecting the sacroiliac pad 3'0 to the abdominal pad 28. The rods 34 and 36 are substantially rigid having an arcuate configuration which conforms to the outer side portions of the body of the person upon which the orthopedic appliance is disposed. As clearly seen in Figure 2, for example, the rod 36, and also the rod 34 will be covered with a suitable padding material indicated at 54. When the hook end portions 52 of the rods 34 and 36 are disposed between the plates 38 and 40 the hook end portion 52 will extend toward the outer surface of the abdominal pad 28 thus obviating any chafing against a wearers body.

A lower edge portion of the abdominal pad 28 is suitably conformed as seen in Figure 3 to provide a comfortable fit on the wearer. The longitudinally spaced slot portions 50 of the cooperating plates 38 and 40 provide means wherein the orthopedic appliance may be disposed on persons of varying girths. Furthermore, the abdominal pad will have a tendency to restrain the stomach or abdomen of a wearer thus improving the posture of such person.

The sacroiliac pad 30 incorporates in opposite ends thereof juxtaposed longitudinally extending plate members 56 and 58 molded in a body member 60 in which said plate members are integrally molded. The plate members 56 and 58 incorporate longitudinally extending groove portions 62 and 64, the plate member 56 having extending through the groove portions 62 a slot or notch pori tion 66 receiving therethrough the hook end portion 68 of the other end of the support rods 34 and 36. The sacroiliac pad 30 is of a greater width than the abdominal pad 23, including on the lower edge thereof arcuate portions 70 and 72 which will be disposed in overlying relationship relative to the sacroiliac joint 22 as clearly shown in Figure 1.

As a person wearing the orthopedic appliance walks, pivotal movement will occur about the sacroiliac joint wherein the upper end portion of the ilia will tend to move in the direction indicated by the direction arrow of Figure 1,. excessive movement being restrained by the upper portion of the sacroiliac pad 30. Inasmuch as the sacroiliac pad 30 and abdominal pad 28 are both constructed of a substantially rigid resilient material, natural rubber or the like, normal movement or functioning of the bones while walking is permitted.

The connection between the hook end portions 52 and 68 of the rods 34 and 36 relative to the cooperating juxtaposed plates in the respective abdominal and sacroiliac pads are loose wherein some articulation is permitted about the transverse axis of said rods 34 and 36, thus permitting slight movement at all four connections when the orthopedic appliance is circumposed about a wearers body, the connections between the rods and the abdominal and sacroiliac plates or pads thus accommodating for normal movement during walking.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may he resorted to, falling Within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An orthopedic appliance for providing support at the sacroiliac joint and preventing excessive pivotal movement between the sacrum and ilia comprising an elongated sacroiliac pad of a substantially rigid resilient material including portions extendible in overlying relationship relative to the ilia and sacrum, a pair of support rods extending from opposite ends of the sacroiliac pad for disposition about the hips of a wearer of the appliance,

and an abdominal pad extendible transversely of a wearers body including means at opposite ends for connection to end portions of the support rods, said abdominal pad comprising a resilient body member, rigid plate members disposed in opposite ends of the abdominal pad, said plate members including longitudinal bore portions communicating with the bore portion in end portions of the body member opening into side edges thereof, a plurality of longitudinally spaced transverse aperture portions extending through the plate member, said support rod members including hook end portions engageable in the transverse aperture portions of said plate member.

2. An orthopedic appliance for providing support at the sacroiliac joint and preventing excessive pivotal movement between the sacrum and ilia comprising an elongated sacroiliac pad of a substantially rigid resilient material including portions extendible in overlying relationship relative to the ilia and sacrum, a pair of support rods extending from opposite ends of the sacroiliac pad for disposition about the hips of a wearer of the appliance, and an abdominal pad extendible transversely of a wearers body including means at opposite ends for connection to end portions of the support rods, said sacroiliac pad incorporating plate members in opposite ends thereof connected to end portions of the support rods, said plate member being positionable in overlying relationship at the sacroiliac joint of a wearer of the appliance, the sacroiliac pad comprising a resilient marginal portion surrounding the plate members at opposite ends thereof providing a resilient abutment when excessive pivotal movement occurs between the ilia and sacrum of a wearer of the orthopedic appliance.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 967,081 Sublett Aug. 9, 1910 1,562,935 Whisner Nov. 24, 1925 1,940,904 Dayton et al. Dec. 26, 1933 2,554,337 Lampert May 22, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US967081 *Aug 23, 1909Aug 9, 1910Samuel H Sublett SrAbdominal supporter.
US1562935 *Apr 18, 1923Nov 24, 1925Hammond Whisner AllenSurgical brace
US1940904 *Oct 13, 1930Dec 26, 1933L And Y Plumbing CoSurgical appliance
US2554337 *Oct 21, 1946May 22, 1951Lampert Chester PSacroiliac belt
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3043311 *Sep 9, 1958Jul 10, 1962Int Latex CorpDeposited latex articles
US3043312 *Nov 13, 1959Jul 10, 1962Int Latex CorpDeposited latex articles
US3075532 *Feb 2, 1959Jan 29, 1963Gen Tire & Rubber CoMolded rubber girdle
US3888245 *Nov 19, 1973Jun 10, 1975Berntson E BoydWeighted surgical belt
US4696291 *Mar 6, 1986Sep 29, 1987Tyo James HPelvic stabilization device
US4989591 *Feb 8, 1989Feb 5, 1991Anders Jr FrankProne position orthopedic appliance for aligning the spine and the femorae
US5241704 *Apr 23, 1992Sep 7, 1993Ergodyne CorporationBack support
US5295947 *Apr 29, 1992Mar 22, 1994H.E. Stanley LaboratoriesChiropractic brace
US5344391 *Jul 10, 1992Sep 6, 1994National Orthotic LaboratoriesHip abduction system
US5363863 *Apr 23, 1993Nov 15, 1994Charles LelliLumbar support belt
US5433697 *Dec 20, 1993Jul 18, 1995Cox; Michael F.Conformable back brace with abdominal support
US5528771 *Jul 29, 1994Jun 25, 1996Yudin; BeniaminBack support
US5547462 *Sep 14, 1995Aug 20, 1996Lanigan; William T.Back brace
US5569171 *Jun 12, 1995Oct 29, 1996Muncy; RonChiropractic brace
US5620412 *Jun 13, 1995Apr 15, 1997National Orthotic Laboratories, Inc.For stabilizing the hip joint
US5785671 *Jul 16, 1996Jul 28, 1998Striano; James S.Lumbar spine support
US6099490 *Oct 29, 1998Aug 8, 2000Turtzo; Craig H.Support brace
US6364186 *Apr 19, 2000Apr 2, 2002Outdoor Medical Research LlcBackpack with abdominal support system
US6500137 *Aug 30, 2001Dec 31, 2002Joseph L. MolinoPelvic region orthotic device
US6896662Feb 26, 2003May 24, 2005Dan S. HeffezMethod for lordosis adjustment for treating discomfort in, or originating in, the cervical spine region
US8156932Mar 16, 2009Apr 17, 2012Embrace LlcMethod and apparatus to relieve menstrual pain
US8191550Jun 28, 2010Jun 5, 2012Embrace, LlcMethod and apparatus to relieve menstrual pain
WO1997003627A1 *Jul 17, 1995Feb 6, 1997Cox Michael FConformable back brace with abdominal support
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/19, 450/155
International ClassificationA61F5/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/028
European ClassificationA61F5/02G