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Publication numberUS2813697 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1957
Filing dateJun 15, 1953
Priority dateJun 15, 1953
Publication numberUS 2813697 A, US 2813697A, US-A-2813697, US2813697 A, US2813697A
InventorsSwart Kenneth H
Original AssigneeSecurity Engineering Division
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stabilizer for drill collars and drill pipes
US 2813697 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 19, 1957 K. H. SWART STABILIZER FOR DRILL COLLARS AND DRILL PIPES Filed June 15 1953 IN V EN TOR.

nrraeuws United States Patent STABILIZER FOR DRILL COLLARS AND DRILL PIPES Kenneth H. Swart, Whittier, Calif., assignor to Security Engineering Division, Dresser Operations, Inc., Whattier, Calil:., a corporation of California Application June 15, 1953, Serial No. 361,598

Claims. (Cl. 25528) The drill collars are in the form of thick-walled tubular members designed to supply the desired amount of weight on the bit and to afford sufiicient stifiness to cause the bit to drill in a vertical direction despite deviating tendencies occasioned by various strata that are encountered. Despite the thick walls and the stiifness of the drill collars, the flexibility of the drill collars is such-that coupled with the flexibility of the drill pipe, the lower portion of the drilling string will tend to lean against a wall of the hole being drilled which affords an opportunity for the bit to deviate from the vertical.

It has heretofore been proposed to hold the drill collars and/or drill pipe centrally of the hole to avoid this deviation. In so doing, reamers have been incorporated in the drill string a short distance above thesition thereon. The construction of such special drill collars made up of two or more parts is objectionable not only from the standpoint of expense, but also from the standpoint of weakening the structure of the drill collar.

An object of the present invention is to provide an improved stabilizer for drill collars and/or drill pipes wherein the stabilizer is in the form of a split sleeve, the two parts of which can be mutually assembled together about a drill collar and locked in position there on. This enables a single-piece mandrel or drill collar to be employed which can be of adequate strength. The construction is also advantageous in that if a stabilizer becomes worn or damaged it may be disassembled and replaced at the well drilling rig.

Another object of the invention is to provide a stabilizer having the above-mentioned characteristics consisting of a single-piece mandrel or drill collar which is externally reduced between shoulders and which has the stabilizer in the form of a split sleeve assembled thereabouts. This stabilizer has its parts in the form of a metallic reenforcement having rubber disposed on the exterior and interior thereof and bonded thereto. The rubber has an external diameter substantially equal to the gauge diameter of the bit that is being used so that it will be capable of holdingv the mandrel at substantially the center of the hole being drilled. It is externally fluted to provide for the passage of circulation fluid and is preferably internally fluted so that cuttings and abrasives cannot become lodged between the stabilizer and the mandrel and damage the stabilizer or the mandrel. The metallic reenforcement is mainly disposed within the diameters of the shoulders so that if occasion should require washing over the mandrel to recover the mandrel and the balance of the drilling string therebelow, the rubber covering may be stripped down from the stabilizer and the metallic reenforcement will offer no serious impediment. 1

With the foregoing and other objects in View, which will be made manifest in the following detailed description and specifically pointed out in the appended claims, reference is had to the accompanying drawings for an illustrative embodiment of the invention, wherein:

j Figure 1 is a vertical. section through a mandrel or drill collar illustrating a stabilizer embodying the present invention in applied position thereon. This view may be regarded as having been taken substantially upon the line 1-1 upon Fig. 2;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal section taken substantially upon the line 2-2 upon Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a partial view in vertical section taken substantially upon the line 3-3 upon Fig. 1.

Referring to the accompanying drawings wherein similar reference characters designate'similar parts throughout, 10 indicates a conventional drill collar adapted to be incorporated in and form a part of a rotary well drilling string. This drill collar constitutes a tubular mandrel and differs from the conventional drill collar merely in having its exterior reduced in diameter as indicated at 11 between shoulders 12 and 13. As will be observed from the drawing, the mandrel or drill collar 10-may be a single unitary structure in that it is not made up of separate parts threaded or otherwise secured together. Consequently, despite the slight reduction in wall thickness between the shoulders 12 and 13 the mandrel may be adequately strong to resist stresses to which it may be subjected in the well.

The stabilizer consists of two opposed parts, generally indicated at 14 and 15. These parts are preferably identical and are of general semi-cylindrical configuration so that they may be mutually assembled together about the mandrel between the shoulders 12 and 13. Each part consists of a perforated metallic reenforcement 16 having a tongue 17 at one end and a socket 18 at the other that is complementary to the tongue so that it may receive the tongue of the opposed part. .The socket may be formed of two opposed plates riveted as at 19 or otherwise secured to opposite sides of the reenforcement. In the tongues and sockets there are apertures 20 that may be brought into mutual registration and these apertures are tapped while the two opposed parts of the stabilizer are in assembled relationship so that the threaded portions in the sockets and in the tongues will properly align to receive tapered screws 21. The screws are preferably of the Allen set screw type. On the exteriors of the reenforcements 16 there are layers of rubber 22, and similarly on the interiors of the reenforcements there are layers of rubber 23. These layers of rubber are bonded to the metal reenforcements and are mutually connected through the perforations of the reenforcements. The maximum diameter across the stabilizer is substantially equal to the gauge diameter of the bit that is being employed. It may be, however, a slight amount smaller so that the stabilizer will'not engage the walls of the well with a tight fit in the event that the bit wears out of gauge. The external layers 22 are vertically fluted as indicated at 24-to provide for 3. the flow of circulation fluid about the stabilizer. In a similar manner, the internal layers 23 are vertically fluted as indicated at 25 so that there will be grooves or; spaces between the stabilizer andthe mandrel- 10. Li cuttings or abrasiveswork between the stabilizer and the; mandrel these. cuttings or abrasives will work into the. grooves 25: andmay be flushed out without damaging-either the mandrelor the stabilizer.

When it is desiredto: apply the stabilizer to the mandrel the two, opposed parts 14 and 15 are merely assembled: together about the mandrel between the shoulders Hand 13.. The. apertures are caused to align and the set screws- 21 are driven in position. These set screws are disposed well withinthe outside diameter across the stabilizer and are protected thereby. If the stabilizer should become Worn or damaged and itis desired to replace. the stabilizer, the set screws21 can be removed and. the parts 14 and 15 disassembled and replaced.

As will be noted from an inspection of Fig. l, the outside diameter of thereenforcement 16. does not materially project beyond the diameters of, the shoulders 12 and 13.

Consequently, if at any time it should be necessary to wash over the, mandrel to recover a lost portion of the drilling. string the washover tool may merely telescope downwardly over the mandrel and strip the outer rubber layers 22 from the stabilizer. The metallic reenforcement at 16 being within the shoulders ofiers no impediment to such washover operations.

The sections of the stabilizer are not tightened or held in tight engagement withthe mandrel, it being the intention that the mandrel rotate within the stabilizer while the stabilizer may be frictionally held more or less stationary in the well. In the construction above described, a single-piece mandrel or drill collar may be employed of adequate weight and strength, and the parts of the stabilizer can be mutually assembled about the mandrel between shoulders thereon which are integral with the onc piece mandrel.

The term rubber" as herein used does not necessarily refer to natural vulcanized rubber, but is intended to include synthetic rubbers and rubber-like compositions designed to withstand softening'under the temperature and pressure conditions existing in the usual Well.

The constructions herein disclosed may have any one of a number of dilferentstyles of clutches or releasable locksformed. between the bottom ofthe reenforcement of the stabilizer and the'mandrel 10. The-frictional engage- 'ment between the exterior of the stabilizer and thewa-lls of the: well normally holds such clutch or lock out ofengagement so'that the mandrel can be rotated within the stabilizer. However, should the stabilizer become stuck in the well, on: lifting the mandrel the stabilizer may be positively locked against rotation relatively tothe mandrel andunder such circumstances, can be rotated forcibly by the mandrel. Also, if occasion should require drilling downwardly or milling over the mandrel the drilling tool or milling tool on engagement with the top of. the stabilizer will force. it downwardly relatively to the mandrel,.causing the clutch or lock to engage and thus hold the stabilizer against rotation relatively to the mandrel. Such locks or clutches have not been illustrated herein as they have heretofore been employed on drill pipe stabilizers.

Various changes may be made in the details of construction without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A bit stabilizing means for rotary well'drilling strings comprising a one-piece drill collar section having its exterior of reduced diameter between upper and lower shoulders and having means at its ends providing for its incorporation in. a rotary well drilling string, a stabilizer formed of two opposed semi-cylindrically shaped parts applicable to the reduced portion between thev shoulders and occupying substantially all of the: space between the shoulders, each of. said parts comprising a semi-cylindrical,

relatively stiff reenforcement having means at its side edges engageable with the side edges of the reenforcement of the other part, said means comprising a tongue on the side edge of each reenforcement and a socket on the opposed side edge of the opposed reenforcement in which the tongue is receivable, there being apertures in each tongue and socket adapted to register with each other and which are arranged radially of the drill collar section, and screws receivable in said registering apertures and layers. of rubber on the interior and exterior of the reentorcement, the exterior layer being of greater external diameter than the maximum diameter of the drill collar section and the interior diameter of the inner layer being such that the stabilizer is freeto rotate on the drill collar section between the shoulders as a cylinder.

2. A. bit stabilizing means for rotary well drilling strings comprising a one-piece drill collar section having its exterior of reduced diameter between upper and lower shoulders and having means at its ends providing for its incorporation in arotary well drilling string, a stabilizer formed of two opposed semi-cylindrically shaped parts applicable to the reduced portion between the shoulders and occupying substantially all of the space between the shoulders, each of said parts comprising a semi-cylindrical, relatively stiff reenforcement having means at its side edges engageable with the side edges of the reenforcement of the other'part, said means comprising a tongue on the side edge of each reenforcement and a socket on the opposed side edge of the opposed reenforcement in which the tongue is receivable, there being apertures in each tongue and socket adapted to register with each other and which are arranged, radially of the drill collar section, screws receivable in said registering apertures, and layers of rubber on the interior and exterior of the reenforcement, the exteriorlayer being of greater external diameter than themaximum diameter of the drill collar section and the interior diameter of the inner layer being such that the stabilizer is free to rotate on the drill collar section between the shoulders as a cylinder, the exterior and interior surfaces of the stabilizer being vertically fluted.

3. A- bit stabilizing means for rotary well drilling strings comprising a one-piece drill collar section having its exterior of reduced diameter between upper and lower shoulders and having means at its endsproviding for its incorporation in a rotary well drilling string, a stabilizer formed of two opposed semi-cylindrioally shaped parts applicable to the reduced portion between the shoulders and occupying substantially all of the space between the shoulders, eachof said'parts comprising a semi-cylindrical, relatively stiff reenforcement having means at its side edges engageable with the side edges of the reenforcement of the other part, said means comprising a tongue on the side edge of-each reenforcement and a socket on the opposed side edge of the opposed reenforcement inwhich the tongue is receivable, there being apertures in each tongue and socket adapted to register with each other and which are arranged radially of the drill collarsection, screwsreceivable in said registering apertures, and layers of rubber on the interior and exterior of the reenforcement, the exterior layer being; of greater external diameter than the, maximum diameter of the drill collar section and the interior diameter of the inner layer being such that the stabilizer isfree to rotate on the drill collar section between the shoulders as a cylinder, the exterior and interior surfaces of the stabilizer being vertically fluted, the diameter of the reenforcement being no greater than the maximum diameter of the drill collar section.

4". A bit stabilizer comprising twosemi-cylindrical parts adapted'to' be assembled about a mandrel incorporatedin a: drilling: string, each part comprising a semi-cylindrical metallic reenforcement having a circumferentially extending tongue at one end and a complementary circumferentially' open. socket adjacent the other adapted to receive the tongue of the other part, there being radially arranged aperturesin, the'tongues: and sockets adapted to register when the tongues are in the sockets, screws receivable in the aperatures, and layers of vertically fluted rubber on the inside and outside of the reenforcement, the outer layer extending radially outward beyond the tongues and sockets and screws and the inner layer extending radially inward beyond the tongues, sockets and screws.

5. A bit stabilizer comprising two semi-cylindrical parts adapted to be assembled about a mandrel incorporated in a drilling string, each part comprising a semi-cylindrical metallic reenforcement having portions at the sides thereof disposed in overlapping relation to portions of the other part, there being radially arranged apertures in the overlapping portions of said parts adapted to register, radially arranged threaded fasteners receivable in the apertures, and layers of vertically fluted rubber on the inside and outside of the reenforcement, the outer layer extending radially outward beyond the threaded fasteners and the inner layer extending radially inward beyond the inner ends of the threaded fasteners.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Dennie Nov. 29, 1932 Osborne May 23, 1933 Williams July 10, 1934 Holt et a1 May 28, 1935 Moffitt June 11, 1935 Miller Aug. 9, 1938 Kellegrew Oct. 24, 1939 Smith Apr. 16, 1940 Fabrin Oct. 29, 1940 Smith Aug. 5, 1941 Brown et a1 Oct. 23, 1951 Medearis Apr. 28, 1953 Scott et al. June 2, 1953 Williams et al Oct. 27, 1953

Patent Citations
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US1910631 *Dec 30, 1929May 23, 1933Chikgan Oil Tool Company LtdGuide for drill pipe
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2944608 *Mar 25, 1958Jul 12, 1960Robbins & MyersCentralizing spider for wells
US3079998 *Jun 9, 1958Mar 5, 1963Reuter Franz GScraper
US3125382 *Oct 20, 1960Mar 17, 1964 Well tools
US3197262 *Nov 5, 1962Jul 27, 1965Fairchild Byrl RPipe protector
US3220810 *May 3, 1962Nov 30, 1965Merit Products IncFlap-type abrasive wheel
US3227498 *Apr 3, 1963Jan 4, 1966Grant Oil Tool CompanyDrill pipe protector
US3397017 *Feb 21, 1966Aug 13, 1968Byron Jackson IncNon-rotating drill pipe protector
US3410613 *May 25, 1966Nov 12, 1968Byron Jackson IncNon-rotating single-collar drill pipe protector
US3447839 *Jan 9, 1967Jun 3, 1969Salvatori Albert HWelded drill blade stabilizer
US3675728 *Sep 18, 1970Jul 11, 1972Atlantic Richfield CoSlim hole drilling
US3963075 *Mar 27, 1975Jun 15, 1976Evans Orde RCentralizer for elastomer coated blast joint
US4275935 *Jul 17, 1979Jun 30, 1981American Coldset Corp.Drilling stabilizer
US5363931 *Jul 7, 1993Nov 15, 1994Schlumberger Technology CorporationDrilling stabilizer
US5631563 *Dec 20, 1994May 20, 1997Schlumbreger Technology CorporationResistivity antenna shield, wear band and stabilizer assembly for measuring-while-drilling tool
US5833018 *Dec 20, 1996Nov 10, 1998Pegasus International Inc.Protector for a pipe in a casing or wellbore
US5833019 *Nov 27, 1996Nov 10, 1998Pegasus International Inc.For use in a wellbore
US7048064 *Sep 12, 2003May 23, 2006Smith Larry WMulti-unit centralizer
DE1110107B *Jul 7, 1959Jul 6, 1961Drilco Oil Tools IncSchwerstangenfuehrungshuelse
DE1291304B *Feb 20, 1967Mar 27, 1969Byron Jackson IncNicht umlaufender, rohrfoermiger Bohrgestaengeprotektor
DE1299582B *May 13, 1967Jul 24, 1969Byron Jackson IncNicht umlaufender Verschleissschuetzer fuer Bohrrohre
EP0140311A1 *Oct 19, 1984May 8, 1985Dailey Petroleum Services Corp.Apparatus for reducing friction between rotating drill pipe and the well bore
EP0633388A2Jun 13, 1994Jan 11, 1995Services Petroliers SchlumbergerDrilling stabilizer
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/325.4, 175/325.2
International ClassificationE21B17/00, E21B17/10
Cooperative ClassificationE21B17/105
European ClassificationE21B17/10F2