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Publication numberUS2814029 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1957
Filing dateOct 29, 1954
Priority dateOct 29, 1954
Publication numberUS 2814029 A, US 2814029A, US-A-2814029, US2814029 A, US2814029A
InventorsJohn S Mcrea
Original AssigneeSireno Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary beam warning light
US 2814029 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 19, 1957 J. S. M REA ROTARY BEAM WARNING LIGHT Filed Oct. 29, 1954 INVENTOR RQ L WM rZZazzcfi WRNEYS 3 of the reflector is spaced below the horizontal portions 36 of the lamp supporting uprights 34, and has a cutout 45 to provide clearance for the socket 39 of the lamp. The reflector 33 also has a circular opening 46 in its center portion or apex, at the same level as the filament 47 of the lamp 14.

The lower portion of the reflector 33 is attached to a sleeve 48 which is carried by a vertical shaft 49 rotatable in bearing arms 50 of a casting having a circular or ring-shaped base 51 which is mounted on one end of an electric motor 52 placed on and attached to the base 20 of the casing. The reflector 33 is thus mounted for rotation about the lamp 14 in a horizontal path and in operative position with respect to the lamp.

For the purpose of continuously turning the reflector 33 to cause the beam which is projected thereby to revolve in a circular path, the shaft 50 carried a worm gear 54 meshing with a worm 55 driven by the motor 52.

By the above organization, with the motor 52 continuous energized, the reflector 33 will be continually revolved about the stationary lamp 14, resulting in a powerful search light beam being projected through the lens 15 in the manner of an aircraft beacon light, the beam continuously revolving through a full 360 degree arc. It will be noted that at no time is it necessary for the lamp 14 to move, and that the energization of the lamp does not require movable contacts or slip rings, brushes and the like which would be likely to get out of order.

By providing the cut-out or notch 45 in the upper edge 43 of the reflector 33, the latter may be disposed closely adjacent the bulb, providing for an economy in material due to the smaller reflector size made possible by this positioning. Moreover, by the provision of the center opening 46 in the reflector 33 a secondary lighting effect will be obtained from the bulb 14, the lens 15 being illuminated at the rear of the reflector 33 at all times. Because of the presence of the glass envelope of the bulb 14 the apex portion of the reflector 13 is of lessened value in projecting light forwardly past the bulb, and accordingly the provision of the opening 46 does not appreciably reduce the strength of the light beam projected by the reflector.

In accordance with this invention there is also pr0- vided within the casing 13 a flashing light source, to enhance the attention-arresting value of the warning light. Referring to Fig. 2 a lamp socket 57 is provided, mounted on the base 20 and carrying an incandescent lamp 58 which is connected by a lead wire 59 to a flasher device 60 of the type well known to the art. The light 58 may be of relatively high wattage and appreciable brilliance, thereby causing an intense flashing light within the lens 15 which brightly illuminates the lens periodically and intermittently. This flashing light, which illuminates the lens 15 from a point within the casing, in conjunction with the powerful search light beam which is continuously revolving through the lens 15, provides an extremely effective and reliable attention-arresting warning light which is a neecssity for personnel and equipment which may be present at the scene of an accident or other emergency.

The casing 13 is attached to the roof 11 of the car by screws (not shown) passing upward through the roof and into threaded holes 65 in the base 20. A sturdy hollow screw 66 is is provided, passing through a large opening 67 in the base 20 and having a nut 68 by which the base 20 may also be secured to the car roof 11. A lead wire 69 may be brought through the screw 66, to supply the energization for the motor 52, lamps 14 and 5s, and flasher 60.

The improved warning light of this invention is seen to be of extremely simple and economical construction. The casing 13 and lens 15 provide a reliable and efiective seal against the entrance of rain, dirt, etc. I have found that my warning light as above set forth is extremely effective and reliable in its operation throughout an extended period of use, due in part to the absence of moving contacts, brushes, etc., which are obviated by the stationary light source and rotary reflector, and also due to the simplified lens and easing construction involving the single flat sealing washer or gasket 26 which makes the light weather tight. The motor 52 is rated for continuous duty, and due to the extremely light load imposed on the moving parts there is no appreciable wear involved nor lubrication problems. Even though the casing is effectively sealed against the weather it may be instantly opened for replacement of lamps by releasing the clasping means 31, 32.

Variations and modifications may be made within the scope of the claims and portions of the improvements may be used without others.

I claim:

1. An attention-attracting, motivated-beam warning light for a vehicle, comprising a stationary light source; a cup-shaped reflector for said light source; means mounting the cup-shaped reflector for rotation in a horizontal path level with and about the light source and in operative relation thereto, to project a concentrated, substantially horizontal beam therefrom; means for rotating the reflector; and stationary means extending upwardly above the reflector past the top of the reflector, and downward past the outside of the reflector for supporting said light source, said stationary means consisting of a plurality of outwardly disposed slim rods providing a minimum of impediment to said light beam, said reflector having upper and lower edges disposed in substantially parallel, spaced planes, the upper edge of the reflector having a notch to provide clearance for the supporting means of the light source.

2. An attention-attracting, motivated-beam warning light for a vehicle, comprising a stationary light source; a cup-shaped reflector for said light source; means mounting the cup-shaped reflector for rotation in a horizontal path level with and about the light source and in operative relation thereto, to project a concentrated, substantially horizontal beam therefrom; means for rotating the reflector; and stationary means extending upwardly above the reflector past the top of the reflector, and downward past the outside of the reflector, for supporting said light source, said stationary means consisting of a plurality of outwardly disposed slim rods providing a minimum of impediment to said light beam, said reflector having an opening at its apex to enable light from the source to also travel in a direction opposite to the said beam.

3. An attention-attracting, motivated-beam warning light for a vehicle, comprising a stationary light source; a cup-shaped reflector for said light source; means mounting the cup-shaped reflector for rotation in a horizontal path level with and about the light source and in operative relation thereto to project a concentrated, substantially horizontal beam therefrom; means for rotating the reflector; and stationary means extending upwardly above the reflector past the top of the reflector, and downward past the outside of the reflector, for supporting said light source, said stationary means consisting of a plurality of outwardly disposed slim rods providing a minimum of impediment to said light beam, said reflector having upper and lower edges disposed in substantially parallel, spaced planes, the upper edge of the reflector having a notch to provide clearance for the supporting means of the light source, and having an opening at its apex to enable light from the source to also travel in a direction opposite to the said beam.

(References on following page) References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Betts Jan. 22, 1907 Cook May 23, 1922 5 Knox Apr. 11, 1933 6 Kirby July 8, 1941 Slosar May 10, 1949 Wyatt Jan. 23, 1951 Gosswiller Dec. 11, 1951 McDowell June 16, 1953 Wilcox et a1 May 29, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US841845 *Nov 20, 1905Jan 22, 1907Dietz Co R EVehicle-lamp.
US1417457 *Jun 14, 1920May 23, 1922Walter H CookElectric illumination
US1903462 *Dec 26, 1931Apr 11, 1933William A KnoxHeadlight attachment for automobiles
US2248760 *Dec 29, 1938Jul 8, 1941Harrington Kirby WilliamDirectional signal for automobiles
US2469581 *Apr 16, 1947May 10, 1949Richard Slosar PaulRear blinker lamp for automobiles
US2538854 *Apr 4, 1949Jan 23, 1951Wyatt Oscar PFlashing direction signal for motor vehicles
US2578239 *Sep 2, 1948Dec 11, 1951Fed Entpr IncEnclosed rotating signal light
US2642522 *Mar 3, 1949Jun 16, 1953Pyle National CoIllumination apparatus for warning and signaling purposes and having headlight and warning light units adjustable in unison
US2748371 *Jul 6, 1953May 29, 1956United Air Lines IncSignal light
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2832059 *May 24, 1956Apr 22, 1958Jr Charles AdlerExternal lighting system for airplanes
US2960680 *May 4, 1959Nov 15, 1960Lawrence LeaSafety-stop and distress signalling systems
US3139604 *Feb 29, 1960Jun 30, 1964Meiners Optical Devices LtdLamps and lighting equipment
US3176268 *Dec 7, 1962Mar 30, 1965Stanley Meyer IrvingEmergency warning system
US3245071 *Dec 30, 1963Apr 5, 1966George T PillsburyHunter's signaling device
US3280652 *Nov 10, 1964Oct 25, 1966Kuster & Co G M B HFlexible push-and-pull transmitting cables
US3351904 *Apr 5, 1965Nov 7, 1967Anthony Noruk FrankMounting bracket for revolving warning light for vehicles
US3436724 *Jan 24, 1967Apr 1, 1969Tuffet Pierre EdmondAnticollision navigational lights
US3461448 *Sep 13, 1967Aug 12, 1969Kramer EvelynVisual and audible signal attachment for umbrellas,canes and the like
US3546669 *Jun 23, 1969Dec 8, 1970Mars Signal Light CoFlashing emergency signal light
US3633161 *Sep 9, 1969Jan 4, 1972Price Charles WAll directional warning device for slow-moving vehicles
US3764799 *May 30, 1972Oct 9, 1973Rau Swf AutozubehoerFlashing warning light
US3886350 *Jun 29, 1973May 27, 1975Katsukura KazuyoshiLight projector apparatus for controlling profile of light projection
US4054791 *Feb 6, 1975Oct 18, 1977Shane Harold P DuPortable lantern with high speed rotatory beam
US4091369 *Nov 23, 1976May 23, 1978Edelbock Wilhelm KCollision-responsive alarm with a rotating reflector and warning light
US4153926 *Feb 28, 1977May 8, 1979Hurt Jackson DCyclic illumination device
US4229781 *Jan 5, 1979Oct 21, 1980Sasaki Electric Manufac. Co. Ltd.Beam-rotary lamp
US4231078 *Jan 3, 1979Oct 28, 1980Sasaki Electric Mfg. Co. Ltd.Beam-rotary lamp
US4377802 *Mar 12, 1981Mar 22, 1983Whelen Engineering Company, Inc.Lamp/reflector assembly
US4633375 *Jan 27, 1986Dec 30, 1986Dominion Automotive Industries Inc.Flashing lamp construction
US5097397 *Oct 4, 1990Mar 17, 1992Federal Signal CorporationLight bar for mounting to a vehicle's roof
US7131757Nov 14, 2003Nov 7, 2006The Fire Products CompanyHolder and heat sink for high performance light emitting diode warning light assembly
US7360911Jan 14, 2005Apr 22, 2008Powerarc, Inc.Oscillating belt and pulley drive system for high performance light emitting diode warning light assembly
US7404653 *Jul 1, 2003Jul 29, 2008Meridiana Investmenti SaglEmergency optical signalling device
US7909468Oct 11, 2007Mar 22, 2011Beverly LloydDisplay device and method
USRE36245 *Mar 15, 1994Jul 6, 1999Federal Signal CorporationNon-linear signalling device for vehicles
EP0483511A2 *Sep 26, 1991May 6, 1992Federal Signal CorporationNon-linear signalling device for vehicles
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/472, 362/311.6, D10/114.5
International ClassificationB60Q1/26
Cooperative ClassificationB60Q1/2611
European ClassificationB60Q1/26D