Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2814529 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 26, 1957
Filing dateSep 21, 1955
Priority dateSep 21, 1955
Publication numberUS 2814529 A, US 2814529A, US-A-2814529, US2814529 A, US2814529A
InventorsArnt Vernon R
Original AssigneeArnt Vernon R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water dispersing device
US 2814529 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 26, 1957 v R. ARNT E WATER DISPERSING DEVICE Filed Sept. 2l, 1955 lllllllllllllll Ik United State 1 2,814,529 WATER' DISPERSING DEVICEr VernonR. Amt; Chicago, lll. 'i pplication septemer 21,1955, smal No. 535,622

' s claims. (ci. 299-104) This invention relatesT to a water dispersiondevice and particularly to suchl devices adapted for association with the downspout of a building for distributingwater fromV the downspout over a substantial area of the adjacent ground surface.

Downspouts associated with buildings such as residences must make provision for disposingof the water that isv drained from the downspout,'and in mostinstances it is considered desirable to providef drain connections to a storm sewer. While this is done in many instances, there may be considerations which render such storm `sewer connection impossible. Thus, in many localities the storm sewer systems areoverloaded, and as a result connections from downspouts are forbidden, Whilein other instances the cost of providing such storm sewer connections from the downspouts may be consideredJ to bevtoo costly. Where storm sewer connectionsarenot provided for the downspouts of the building, it is usually the practice to discharge the water onto the ground adjacentl to the building and as is widely recognized', such direct discharge onto the ground tends to wash away the ground at and near the point where the discharged water lstrikes the ground- To remedy this conditionv one expedient that has been employed is the provision of a relatively large area of stone or concrete on the l ground as a splash block inthe path of the discharged water, but in; most locations adjacent residences, this expedient is not desirable because it detracts from the appearance of the adjacent lawn areas.

In view of the foregoing it is the primary object of the present invention to provide a water disposal unit adaptedfor association with the downspouts of a residence or the like and which is eifective to distribute water from the downspout over a relatively large area and in such a way that the ground or lawn surface will not be disturbed` by the discharged Water. More specically, it is an object of the present invention to provide such a unit in which `a normally coiled, exible water distributing member may be associated with a downspout in such a manner that when water iiows downwardly in the downspout, the pressure head of such water is eiective to uncoil a distributing member onto the adjacent ground surface so that the water from the downspout will be sprinkled over the area with a gentle spraying action so as to avoid disturbing the ground surface.

Other and related objects of the present invention are to afford such a water dispersion unit that may be readily associated with downspouts of the longitudinally corrugated type, to enable such unit to be fully drained after ithas returned to its coiled normal position, and to alford a unit lof the aforesaid character that may be economically manufactured and sold and which may be associated with a downspout in a simple manner.

Other and further objects of the present invention will be' apparent from the following description and claims, and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, which by way of illustration, show preferred embodiments of the present invention and thev principles thereof, and what I- -ew consider to be the best modein'which'I haveV contemplatedapplying these principles. Other embodiments of the invention embodying the same or equivalent principlesmay be used and structural changes may be made as desired by those skilled in the art without departing from the invention.

In theA drawings-z Fig. l is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating a water dispersion uni-t embodying the features of the invention and operatively associated with a downspout, the dispersion unitV being shown in its normal coiled relationship;

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. l and illustrating the water dispersion unit in its extended operating position;

Fig. 3 is a transverse cross sectional view of the flexible dispersing or sprinkling member, the view being taken substantially along the line 3 3 of Fig. 2.;

Fig. 3A isl a View similar to Fig. 3 and illustrating another cross sectional form that may be employed in the dispersing member;

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially alongitheline 4--4 of Fig. 1;

Fig.. 5 is a. plan sectional view taken substantially along the kline 5 5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 5A is a view similar to Fig. 5 and illustrating another form of clamping means that may be employed in associating the unit with a downspout of rectangular cross section;v

Fig. 6 is a view somewhat similar to Fig. 4 and illustrating an alternative embodiment of the invention; and

Fig.V 7 is a cross sectional View taken substantially along the line 7-7 of Fig. 6.

For purposes of disclosure the invention is herein illustrated as embodied in a water dispersing and distributing unit i0 which comprises an elongated, normally coiled sprinkling member 11 that may be mounted on the lower end of a downspout 12 so as to normally assume the compact coiled relationship shown in Fig. l, but which when subjected to the pressure head of water coming down the spout 12, is automatically extended or uncoiled to the relation shown in Fig. 2 so that the sprinkling member extends for a substantial distance along the ground Surface. In this extended or operative relationship of the sprinkling member 11, the water from the downspout will be distributed or dispersed with a gentle spraying action over a substantial area, thus to avoid washing away of the ground by the discharged water, `and when the flow of water stops, the reduction or removal of the pressure head permits the sprinkling member 11 to return to its normal coiled relation of Fig. l.

In the form of the invention shown in Figs. l, 2, 3, 4 and 5 the elongated sprinkling member 11 is hollow and relatively at in form and is made from a exible material such as a plastic, rubber, or rubberlike material to provide a substantial passage area through which water may ow longitudinally of the member l1. Thus, as illustrated specifically in Fig. 3 of the drawings, the member 11 has a pair of tubular elements IIL and 11R between which a central rectangular tubular member 11C is formed in an integral relation. The central tubular member 11C serves to house coiling means that act yieldingly to urge the sprinkling member 11 toward its normal coiled relation of Fig. l. Such coiling means as shown in Fig. 3, comprises a flat spring steel band 14 extended through the passage or tubular member llC and having a normally coiled relation or form. Thus, the coiled band 14 normally tends to coil the Vsprinkling member 11.

The free end of the sprinkling member 11 is so formed that water cannot discharge freely therefrom, and as herein shown this free end is fully closed as by an end clamp l5, Fig. 2.

The spray-like distribution of the WaterV from the sprinkling member 11 is attained by providing a large number of relatively small discharge or spray openings 16 in what amounts to the upper surface of the tubular members 11R and 11L, as shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 4, it being noted that when the sprinkling member 11 is" in its coiled relation of Figs. l and 4, these openings 16 are in the surfaces of the member 11 that face the center of the coil. i

At its other or mounting end the sprinkling member 11 has coupling means whereby the unit 10 may be operatively connected to the lower end of the downspout 12,. Such coupling means as herein shown comprise a hollow tapered transition member 18,` molded from a material such as that used for the member 11, so as to be somewhat funnel-like in shape land having its lower 'end joined to the member 11 so that water may ow through the member 18 and into the tubular elements 11L and 11R. If desired, the adjacent end'of the central passage 11C may be sealed as at 19 so as to protect the coiling member 14 from water.

The upper end of the transition member 18 is formed so that it may be slipped over the lower end of the downspout 12, and to enable this upper end to be clamped in a sealed relation to the usual` corrugated type of downspout, the upper end of the member 1S is formed with a thick resilient collar 18C which may be compressed into such corrugations by a ring-type clamp 20 and its clamping screw or bolt 20S, as shown in Figs. 4 and 5. This assures a tightly sealed relationship between the downspout 12 and the dispersing unit 10 so that the pressure head of water in the downspout 12 will be effective upon the unit 10 to extend the same when the necessity ar1ses.

The etective longitudinal passage area of the sprinkling member 11 is preferably substantially equal to the passage area of downspout, and the total elfective area of the spray openings 16 is also substantially equal to the downspout area,` and this relationship assures that the distributing capacity of the unit 11 will be such as to take care of the maximum water flow from the downspout.

This relationship may however be varied to a considerable extent, as desired, for it will be evident that the advantages of the present unit will be attained in a large measure even where its distributing capacity is occassionally exceeded.

Where higher emergency capacity is required, this may be provided by making the tubular members 11L and 11R of an easily stretchable material so that when unusually high pressures are built up due to an excessive runoff rate of water from the roof, the members 11L and 11E` will be distended, thus to increase the size of the openings 16 with a corresponding increase in the rate of water dispersion.

In the use of the dispersing unit 10, the resilient coiling means 14 is effective normally to maintain the sprinkling member 11 in its coiled, out of the way relation of Fig. l wherein it presents a neat appearance and is fully withdrawn from ground contact so that it will not cause discoloration of the lawn surface and will not interfere with the lawn growth. When, however, water drains from the building roof through the drain pipe 12, it will gather within the coiled member and in the connector 18 until a suicient pressure head is established in the drain pipe 12 to overcome the coiling forces exerted by the spring member 14, and at this time the sprinkling member 11 will start to uncoil and to extend itself away from the building toward the relationship of Fig. 2. While the forces exerted by the pressure head of water, and the weight of the water in the extended member 11 remain suicient to overcome the coiling forces exerted by the coiling member 14, the member 11 will remain in its extended position and will distribute the water with a gentle sprinkling action over a relatively large area.

When the flow of water decreases, the forces tending to maintain the member 11 extended gradually decrease,

and when such forces become insuicient to overcome the coiling forces of the member 14, the member 11 will be returned to the coiled relation of Fig. l. As such coiling progresses most of the water will be discharged from the member 11 through the openings 16, but as the final coiled relation is reached some water within the lowermost portion of the member 11 will be located below the level of the lowermost openings 16. To eiectually drain this nal portion of the water from the coil, a. small drain opening 21. is preferably provided in the bottoms of each of the tubular members 11L and 11R, and at the lowermost point of the coil, as shown in Fig. 4.

The means for exerting coiling forces on the member 11 may take different forms, and one such alternative form of sprinkling member 111 is illustrated in Fig. 3A of the drawings. Thus, a central strip 111C of solid cross section is formed from a resilient material such as plastic or rubber so as to normally assume a coiled relation, and tubular members 111R and 111L are joined as by vulcanizing or other bonding processes to opposite sides of the strip 111C so as to be coiled thereby. The tubular members 111K and 11.1L have sprinkling openings 116 formed in their upper surfaces, and the member 111 is associated with the other elements of the dispersing unit in the manner hereinbefore described.

As pointed out hereinabove, downspouts are made in different cross sectional shapes, such for example as the rectangular shape embodied in the downspout 112 shown in Fig. 5A. In such an instance the upper end of the connector 18 may be stretched into position about the lower end of the rectangular downspout 112 and may be clamped in position thereon by a two-part clamp 120 having a pair of clamping screws or bolts 120S at the opposite corners.

In Figs. 6 and 7 of the drawing another alternative embodiment of the invention is illustrated wherein a disu persing unit 210 is associated with a drain spout 212 and has an elongated sprinkling member 211 that is formed from a exible material such as plastic or rubber so as to have a somewhat oval cross sectional form. The sprinkling member 211 is sealed or substantially sealed at its free end by means such as a clamp 215, while at its mounting end it has connecting means including a funnel-like transition member 218 and a sealing band 218C that may be connected to the down spout 212 by a clamp 220 and clamping bolt 2208 in the manner hereinbefore described. The sprinkling member 211 has upper spray openings 216, and a tinal drain opening 221 that are formed and located in the manner hereinbefore described in connection with Figs. 1 to 4.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in Figs. 6 and 7, the coiling forces are applied to the sprinkling member 211 by coiling means located externally thereof, and such coiling means comprise a helically wound spring 214 which in itself tends to assume a spirally coiled relation. The spring 214 is placed about the sprinkling member 211, and is extended upwardly about the tapered connecting member 218, as shown in Figs. 6 and 7 so that the coiling tendency of the spring 214 normally rolls the sprinkling member 211 into the coiled form shown in Fig. 6. The upper end of the spring 214 is preferably anchored as by bending the end over the clamp 220, as indicated at 214B in Fig. 6. The dispersing unit 210 operates in the same advantageous manner as the previously described structures.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that the present invention provides a water dispersing unit that may readily and easily be associated with a downspout to disperse the drained water with a gentle sprinkling action over a substantial adjacent lawn area or the like, thus to avoid objectionable washing away of the earth near the downspout. It will also be evident that the automatically attained extension and retraction of the sprinkling element of the unit produces a normal appearance` that is attractive, and also enables the normalaai/gesso growth of the lawn to be attained. Moreover, the dispersing unit of the present invention is capable of manufacture and sale as an independent item of merchandise, and may be installed by purchaser.

Thus, while I have illustrated and described preferred embodiments of the invention, it will be understood that these may be varied by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a water dispersion device for association with the lower end of downspouts, said device comprising an elongated hollow member made of llexible material, one end of said member being substantially closed, resilient means associated with said member effective normally to wind said member into a spiral form, means at the other end of said member for connecting the same to a downspout to apply the water pressure from the downspout to said member to thereby apply unwinding forces to said member, and said member having openings therein through which water from such a downspout may be dispersed.

2. In a device of the character described, an elongated hollow flexible member h-aving a plurality of spaced outlet openings formed in one side thereof throughout the length of said member, means associated with said member yieldingly urging said member to a spirally coiled relation wherein said openings face inwardly of the coil and wherein one end of said member is disposed at the center of the coil and the other end is disposed at the outside of the coil, means substantially closing said one end of said member, and means for connecting said other end to a downspout with the center of the coil spaced away from the wall of the building whereby water pressure of water passing down said spout is effective to unwind said member onto the adjacent ground surface and to discharge said water over a substantial area as sprays from said openings.

3. In a device of the character described, an elongated hollow flexible member having a plurality of spaced outlet openings formed in one side thereof throughout the length of said member, means associated with said member yieldingly urging said member to a spirally coiled relation wherein said openings face inwardly of the coil and wherein one end of said member is disposed at the center of the coil and the other end is disposed at the outside of the coil, means substantially sealing said one end of said member, means for connecting said other end to a downspout with the center of the coil spaced away from the wall of the building whereby water pressure of water passing down said spout is effective to unwind said member onto the adjacent ground surface and to discharge said water as sprays from said openings, and said member being made from a stretchable material so that increase of Water pressure may act to increase the size of said outlet openings.

4. In a water disposal and dispersion device, an elongated exible hose-like member having an inlet end with means for connecting said inlet end to a downspout, said member being adapted to extend for a substantial distance from such a downspout along the adjacent ground surface and having an upper surface with spray openings formed therein, means substantially closing the other end of said member to thereby cause water :flowing into said member to be discharged through said spray openings, and resilient coiling means operatively associated with said member normally operable, in the absence of water pressure within said member, to roll said member into a compact coil disposed adjacent the downspout to which the inlet end of said member is connnected.

5. A device according to claim 4 wherein said coiling means comprises an elongated helical spring surrounding said elongated member and tending normally to assume a spirally coiled relation.

6. A device according to claim 4 wherein said coiling means comprises an elongated spirally coiled spring eX- tended longitudinally through said elongated member.

7. A device according to claim 4 wherein said coiling means comprises an elongated band of molded rubberlike material extended longitudinally of and connected to said elongated member and formed to normally assume a spirally coiled relation.

8. In a water dispersing and distributing unit for downspouts, a connector adapted to be secured to a downspout to receive water therefrom, an elongated spray member carried by said connector to receive water therefrom and shiftable, by water pressure applied through said connector, from a retracted relation to an extended relation, and yielding means urging said member to its retracted relation.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 532,642 Crowell Jan. 15, 1895 941,150 Johnson n Nov. 23, 1909 1,785,314 Kelly Dec. 16, 1930 2,619,125 Eickmeyer et al. Nov. 25, 1952 2,621,075 Sedar Dec. 9, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US532642 *Sep 17, 1894Jan 15, 1895 John s
US941150 *Jul 20, 1907Nov 23, 1909Sven Malcolm JohnsonHose and pipe coupling.
US1785314 *Mar 11, 1927Dec 16, 1930Kelly Sidney RHose mender
US2619125 *Oct 31, 1947Nov 25, 1952Dayton Pump And Mfg CompanyDispensing hose
US2621075 *May 21, 1951Dec 9, 1952Resin IndMultiple irrigation tubing
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2851306 *Nov 7, 1957Sep 9, 1958Huffaker Norman LSoaker hose
US2952413 *May 20, 1957Sep 13, 1960Sunbeam CorpLawn sprinkler
US2982971 *Jun 3, 1959May 9, 1961Alexander GarawaySwimming pool cleaning apparatus
US3035779 *Dec 16, 1959May 22, 1962Convis Orville PSelf-retracting downspout discharge extension
US3081488 *Feb 17, 1960Mar 19, 1963Casavan Ind IncMold form for fabricating modules
US3113723 *Nov 1, 1962Dec 10, 1963Arnt Vernon RLawn fountain
US3192956 *Apr 3, 1962Jul 6, 1965Elgen Mfg CorpPrefabricated conduits
US3288169 *Apr 26, 1963Nov 29, 1966Moss Trevor FPneumatic hose
US3289216 *Feb 9, 1965Dec 6, 1966Philip Anthony MyronRetractable swimming pool cleaner
US3369477 *May 13, 1965Feb 20, 1968Enioch C. VittoeCoffee-brewing device
US3826288 *Apr 20, 1973Jul 30, 1974Dayco CorpSelf-recoiling hose
US3904121 *Nov 20, 1973Sep 9, 1975Geagan Edward RWater distributor for downspouts
US3966121 *May 22, 1975Jun 29, 1976Benson Mfg. CorporationDownspout extension
US3988396 *Jun 16, 1975Oct 26, 1976Stannard Forrest BSewage treatment
US4010898 *Jul 21, 1975Mar 8, 1977Williams David MIrrigation method and apparatus
US4246305 *Mar 22, 1978Jan 20, 1981Solentanche-EntreprisePerforated polyethylene strips with internal channels, made by extrusion
US4582257 *Dec 12, 1983Apr 15, 1986Frederick SieglerSprinkler hose with self winding capability
US4836291 *May 21, 1987Jun 6, 1989Amoco CorporationPortable sprinkler and process for fighting fires in oil refineries and the like
US5123542 *Jun 3, 1991Jun 23, 1992Hoppe Gerald WMethod and apparatus for cleaning, distributing and aerating grain
US5148982 *Apr 26, 1991Sep 22, 1992Ekhoff Donald LAdjustable slit nozzle
US5171044 *Jul 12, 1990Dec 15, 1992Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd.Pipe unit
US5211639 *May 30, 1990May 18, 1993Wilk Peter JEvacuator assembly
US5220755 *Feb 27, 1992Jun 22, 1993Rotec Inc.High pressure water distributor for downpipes
US5301633 *Jul 19, 1993Apr 12, 1994Lloyd Thomas GFlexible bladder for soaking the earth and collecting earthworms and method of use
US5322521 *Aug 31, 1992Jun 21, 1994Wilk Peter JMethod for use during surgery
US5407300 *Oct 1, 1993Apr 18, 1995Total Containment, Inc.System for vapor recovery without formation of fluid blockages and a dual conduit pipe therefor
US5607107 *Sep 13, 1993Mar 4, 1997Grieve; James A.Retractable hose
US5716004 *Apr 20, 1995Feb 10, 1998Nibco, Inc.Retractable irrigation apparatus and method
US5740885 *Aug 10, 1995Apr 21, 1998Paradise; WilliamFireproof water-cooled escape cable and method
US5783286 *Apr 4, 1996Jul 21, 1998Dinicola; James L.Hollow-core plastic structural lumber alternative
US5813701 *Mar 7, 1996Sep 29, 1998Gutter World, Inc.Repositionable flexible downspout extension
US5915735 *Sep 2, 1998Jun 29, 1999Gutter World, Inc.Repositionable flexible downspout extension
US6041825 *Jan 16, 1998Mar 28, 2000Gutter World, Inc.Repositionable flexible downspout extension
US6047495 *Jun 8, 1995Apr 11, 2000Novartis CorporationPest-controlling apparatus for use in livestock barns
US6202358 *Nov 5, 1999Mar 20, 2001Lawrence M. JaneskyRain chute
US6223777Oct 18, 1999May 1, 2001Gutter World, Inc.Repositionable, flexible, and extendible connector
US6397893 *Aug 30, 1999Jun 4, 2002Delaval Holding AbEasily bendable tubing for two separate fluids
US6526700 *Jun 8, 2001Mar 4, 2003Joseph PilcherHigh pressure downspout
US6910505 *Apr 12, 2002Jun 28, 2005Micasa Trading CorporationCoiled hose
US7458532Nov 17, 2006Dec 2, 2008Sloan W HaynesLow profile attachment for emitting water
US7748650Oct 31, 2008Jul 6, 2010InvisaFlow LLCLow profile attachment for emitting water
US7832492Jun 8, 2007Nov 16, 2010Eldridge John PPortable fire fighting apparatus and method
US8251302Nov 17, 2009Aug 28, 2012InvisaFlow LLCLow profile attachment for emitting water with connector for corrugated pipe
US8291941Nov 4, 2011Oct 23, 2012Blue Gentian, LlcExpandable and contractible hose
US8291942Jun 5, 2012Oct 23, 2012Blue Gentian, LlcExpandable hose assembly
US8475654May 4, 2010Jul 2, 2013Jeffrey E. SmithDownspout drain connection and filter
US8479776Nov 30, 2012Jul 9, 2013Blue Gentian, LlcExpandable garden hose
US8539718Jan 19, 2011Sep 24, 2013Tom ZieglerRain catch for collecting and diverting rainwater from a retractable awning
US8556195Jul 10, 2012Oct 15, 2013Invisaflow, LlcLow profile attachment for emitting water
US8578976Dec 15, 2009Nov 12, 2013Stephen D. DavisRain water collection system
US8602066Nov 22, 2010Dec 10, 2013Euramax International, Inc.Low profile conduit extension for downspouts
US8689837Aug 27, 2010Apr 8, 2014Jeffrey E. SmithLow profile downspout extension and landscape drainage assembly
US8715495Jun 4, 2013May 6, 2014Jeffrey E. SmithDownspout drain connection and filter
DE202012012663U1Jul 24, 2012Jul 30, 2013Blue Gentian, LlcAusdehnbare Schlauchbaugruppe
DE202012012762U1Jul 24, 2012Oct 17, 2013Blue Gentian, LlcAusdehnbare Schlauchbaugruppe
EP1563912A2 *Jan 4, 2005Aug 17, 2005Hermann BergmannSpray device
EP2520840A2Jul 24, 2012Nov 7, 2012Blue Gentian, LLCExpandable hose assembly
EP2657585A1Jul 24, 2012Oct 30, 2013Blue Gentian, LLCExpandable hose assembly
WO1994003688A1 *Aug 4, 1993Feb 17, 1994James A GrieveRetractable hose
WO1994006566A1 *Sep 21, 1992Mar 31, 1994Donald Lynn EkhoffAdjustable slit nozzle
WO1996033024A1 *Apr 19, 1996Oct 24, 1996NibcoRetractable irrigation apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/208, 239/566, 138/111, 138/178, 138/134, 239/602, 239/450, 138/103, 239/197, 239/533.13, D23/214, 405/43, 239/548, 239/546
International ClassificationB05B1/20, B05B1/14
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/20
European ClassificationB05B1/20