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Publication numberUS2814827 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 3, 1957
Filing dateJul 28, 1952
Priority dateJul 28, 1952
Publication numberUS 2814827 A, US 2814827A, US-A-2814827, US2814827 A, US2814827A
InventorsFloyd E Snow, Jones O York
Original AssigneeCoast Pro Seal Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Applicator and mixer for viscous materials
US 2814827 A
Abstract  available in
Images(14)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 3, 1957 E. s ow ETAL 2,814,827

APPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR VISCOUS MATERIALS Filed July 28. 1952 14 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS FAOVO E. SNOW JONES 0. 5 09K BY {214 %rroeua APPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR VISCOUS MATERIALS Filed July 28. 1952 Dec. 3, 1957 F. E. sNow ETAL 14 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS f-ZOVD 5 suaw JONES a. VOQZ arm/905V Dec. 3, 1957 F. E. SNOW ETAL APPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR VISCOUS MATERIALS Filed July 28. 1952 l4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTORS FAOVD E. SK/060 JONES 0. #0216 Dec. 3, 1957 F. E. SNOW ET AL 2,814,

APPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR VISCOUS MATERIALS Filed July 28. 1952 14 Sheets-Sheet 5 Mall. 56 55 INVENTORS HOVD 6'. 51/060 z/OA/fS O. V0916 APFLICATOR AND MIXER FOR vxscous MATERIALS Filed July 28. 1952 Dec. 3, 1957 F. E. SNOW ETAL l4 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTORS FOVD 5 54/060 1/04/55 0- WORK Dec. 3, 1957 F. E. SNOW ET AL 2,314,827

APPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR vrscous MATERIALS Filed July 28. 1952 14 Sheets-Sheet 7 APPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR vxscous MATERIALS Filed July 28. 1952 Dec. 3, 1957 F. E. SNOW ETAL 14 Sheets-Sheet 8 qi s iixmmg- JNVENTORS aoua E. suaw JOVES' 0. me

Dec. 3, 1957 F. E. SNOW ETAL APPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR VISCOUS MATERIALS Filed July 28. 1952 l4 Sheets-Sheet 9 IN VENTORS HOVD 6'. 53 /060 JONES 0. V085 wave/ 15V Dec. 3, 1957 F. E. SNOW ET AL 2,814,827

APPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR VISCOUS MATERIALS Filed July 28. 1952 14 Sheets-Sheet 10 VENTOR5 HOVD SA/Odl/ JUNE-.5 0. V0196 1957 F. E. SNOW ETAL 2,814,327

AFPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR VISCOUS MATERIALS 14 Sheets-Sheet 11 Filed July 28. 1952 am mm mm H m m 5 m INVENTORS HUI/0 5 51/040 JONES 0. #0216 BY firraeufi Dec. 3, 1957 ow ETAL 2,814,827

APPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR VISCOUS MATERIALS Filed July 28. 1952 14 Sheets-Sheet 12 BY JONES 0. W

MJZW PTTO/QA/EV F. E. SNOW ETAL Dec. 3, 1957 2,814,827

APPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR vrscous MATERIALS Filed July 28. 1952 14 Sheets-Sheet 13 Dec. 3, 1957 F. E. SNOW ETAL 2,814,327

APPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR ISCOUS MATERIALS t BY rroec/Fd United States Patent APPLICATOR AND MIXER FOR VISCOUS MATERIALS Floyd E. Snow, Pasadena, and Jones 0. York, Burbank,

Califl, assignors, by mesne assignments, to Coast Pro- Seal Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, Calif., a corporation of California Application July 28, 1952, Serial No. 301,174

9 Claims. (Cl. 18-2) This invention relates to the application of viscous compounds or mixtures, such as rubber-like sealing compounds.

It is often essential to flow compounds of this character over localities where surfaces are in contact, as, for example, around the flange of a cover plate for airplane gasoline tanks.

Such compounds are also used around bolts and nuts. The compound usually includes rubber-like, tacky material that hardens on exposure to air.

The individual constituents of such a mixture are a rubber material and a catalyzer. When mixed, setting takes place at a slow rate.

In order efficiently to utilize such compounds, they should accordingly be mixed at the time they are to be applied; for, otherwise, setting of the mixture would render them incapable of use.

It is one of the objects of this invention to provide a compact and inexpensive mixer and applicator that performs the essential function of intimate intermixture of the constituent elements at the time the compound is to be used.

It is another object of this invention to provide a structure for the mixer that effectively and intimately associates the catalyzer and rubber material, preferably by a rubbing, as well as a cutting, or comminuting action.

It is still another object of this invention to facilitate the cleaning of the parts, as by ready and rapid removal of these parts. This feature is particularly important, since the materials treated are sticky or gummy.

This invention possesses many other advantages, and has other objects which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration of several embodiments of the invention. For this purpose, there are shown a few forms in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. These forms will now be described in detail, illustrating the general principles of the invention; but it is to be understood that this detailed description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, since the scope of the invention is best defined by the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of an apparatus incorporating the invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation thereof;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 4-4 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary enlarged sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 6-6 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 7 is a sectional view, similar to Fig. 4, of a modified form of the invention;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged vertical sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 8-8 of Fig. 2;

2,814,827 Patented Dec. 3, 1957 Fig. 9 is a vertical sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 9-9 of Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 is an exploded view of the mixing mechanism;

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary view, similar to Fig. 9, but illustrating another position of the apparatus;

Fig. 12 is a sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 12-12 of Fig. 11;

Fig. 13 is a sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 13-13 of Fig. 9;

Fig. 14 is a sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 14-14 of Fig. 11;

Figs. 15, 16, and 17 are fragmentary sectional views, similar to Fig. 9, of modified forms of the invention;

Fig. 18 is an enlarged sectional view of another modified form of this invention;

Figs. 19 and 20 are sectional views, taken along the planes indicated by lines 19-19 and 20-20, respectively, of Fig. 18;

Fig. 21 is a fragmentary sectional view, taken along the plane indicated by line 21-21 of Fig. 20;

Fig. 22 is an elevation of a part of the mechanism illustrated in Fig. 18;

Fig. 23 is an enlarged sectional view, illustrating another modified form of this invention;

Figs. 24, 25, and 26 are sectional views, taken along planes indicated by lines 24-24, 25-25, and 26-26, respectively, of Fig. 23;

Fig. 27 is a view partly in section, taken along a plane indicated by line 27-27 of Fig. 26;

Fig. 28 is an enlarged vertical sectional view, illustratin g another modified form of this invention;

Fig. 29 is a view, partly in section, taken along a plane indicated by line 29-29 of Fig. 28;

Fig. 30 is a sectional view, taken along a plane indicated by line 30-30 of Fig. 28;

Fig. 31 is a sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 31-31 of Fig. 30;

Fig. 32 is an elevation of part of the mechanism illustrated in Fig. 28;

Fig. 33 is an enlarged vertical sectional view of still another modified form of this invention;

Figs. 34, 35, and 36 are sectional views, taken along planes indicated by lines 34-34, 35-35, and 36-36, respectively, of Fig. 33;

Fig. 37 is a sectional view, taken along the plane indicated by line 37-37 of Fig. 36;

Fig. 38 is an enlarged vertical sectional view, illustrating still another modified form of this invention;

Figs. 39, 40, and 41 are sectional views, taken along planes indicated by lines 39-39, 40-40, and 41-41, respectively, of Fig. 38;

Fig. 42 is a sectional view, taken along the plane indi cated by line 42-42 of Fig. 40;

Fig. 43 is an enlarged vertical sectional view, illustrating still another modified form of this invention;

Figs. 44, 45, and 46 are sectional views, taken along planes indicated by lines 44-44, 45-45, and 46-46, respectively, of Fig. 43;

Fig. 47 is an elevation of a part of the mechanism illustrated in Fig. 43;

Fig. 48 is an enlarged vertical sectional view of still another modified form of this invention;

Figs. 49, 50, and 51 are sectional views, taken along planes indicated by line 49-49, 50-50, and 51-51 of Fig. 48;

Fig. 52 is a sectional view, taken along the plane indicated by line 52-52 of Fig. 51;

Fig. 53 is an enlarged vertical sectional view of still another modified form of this invention;

Figs. 54, 55, and 56 are sectional views, taken along 3 planes corresponding to lines 56-56 of Fig. 53; and

Fig. 57 is a sectional view, taken along the plane indicated by line 57-57 of Fig. 55.

The device, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, includes a barrel 1 of generally hollow cylindrical configuration. This barrel is divided into two cylinder spaces 2 and 3 (Fig. 3) into which the two constituent materials (such as a catalyst and a rubber material) may be placed for ultimate discharge, under pressure exerted in these spaces, through a spout structure 4 (Figs. 1 and 2) mounted on the barrel 1. The intermingling of the materials prior to discharge is eifected in a manner to be hereinafter described.

In order to form the cylinder spaces 2 and 3, use is made of an intermediate wall structure comprising the mating halves 5 and 6 (Figs. 8, 9, and 11). These halves are of generally cylindrical configuration to fit the interior of the cylinder barrel 1. They are provided with appropriate mating recesses to define apertures for bearings, etc., all as hereinafter described. The halves 5 and 6 are held together by four screws 7 (Figs. 8 and 9). As shown most clearly in Fig. 9, O-rings 21 and 22 are provided in grooves formed in the peripheries of these halves so as to isolate the cylinder spaces 2 and 3 from each other.

The opposite ends of the inner bore of barrel 1 are each provided with an outward taper for the accommodation of the cover members 16 and 17 (Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 5). These cover members are provided with the flanges 18, 19, respectively telescoping into the ends of the barrel 1 and fastened thereto as by snap rings 10.

Halves 5 and 6 cooperate to define a space 8 in which appropriate mechanism is located for the operation of piston structures in the cylindrical spaces 2 and 3. This mechanism will be described hereinafter.

A threaded bushing 9 (Figs. 2, 8, 9 and 11) is accommodated in a threaded aperture formed by the halves 5 and 6, and is bottomed therein. The axis of this bushing is transverse to the axis of barrel 1. It passes radially into the barrel through a radial aperture, and thus serves to restrain relative axial movement between the barrel 1 and the structure 5-6. It also serves as a main support for the disintegrating and mixing elements.

A similar bushing 11 (Fig. 8) extends coaxially with the bushing 9, at the lower side of the barrel 1, and is similarly threaded into an appropriate threaded aperture formed by the halves 5 and 6. The bushing 11 is bottomed in this threaded aperture.

Two identical piston structures, respectively in the cylinder spaces 2 and 3, are provided for urging the material from these two spaces 2 and 3 through the chopper and mixer mechanism supported by the bushing 9.

These piston structures are shown to best advantage in Figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6.

Each piston structure includes a cylindrical piston proper 23, carrying a sealing O-ring 24 located in a groove in the periphery of the piston. A pair of spaced nuts 25 and 26, having exterior cylindrical surfaces, are telescoped within appropriate apertures in the piston 23. Flanges 27 on these nuts extend partially into counterbores of these apertures. The peripheries of the flanges, as shown most clearly in Figs. 4 and 6, are each provided with a pair of arcuate recesses 28 at diametrically opposite places of the flange. These recesses form plane surfaces coplanar with the end surfaces of the piston 23. Engaging one of these recesses is the cylindrical head 29 of screw 12, threaded in an aperture adjacent the nut 26. This head 29 has a hexagonal recess 13 (Fig. 4) to permit removal and replacement of the screw. In this way, the nuts are prevented from rotating, and they are also restrained against axial movement with respect to the piston 23. The two recesses of each nut 26 make it possible to adjust the angular positions of the nuts by half revolutions.

5454, 5S-55, and

In order to gain access to the spaces 2 and 3, removable threaded plugs 32 are provided in each of the pistons 23. Knurled and slotted head 36 is provided for manual manipulation.

Thus, to gain access to the spaces 2 and 3 to insert ingredients to be mixed, the covers 16 and 17, as well as the plugs 32, may be removed.

For moving the pistons 23 simultaneously toward the wall 56, use is made of a pair of lead screws 38 and 39. These lead screws respectively have two threaded sections 40, 41 and 42, 43. The sections 40 and 41 are of opposite threads, as are the sections 42 and 43. Ac cordingly, simultaneous rotation of the lead screw will move the pistons 23 toward each other. The rate at which the materials in cylinder spaces 2 and 3 are urged into the bushing 9 is dependent upon the relative pitches of sections 40, 41 and 42, 43. Thus, if the materials are to be delivered in equal amounts, the pitches are equal. Assuming that the material in the left-hand chamber 2 is to be delivered at a faster rate than the material in chamber 3, then, in that event, the pitches of the threaded sections 40 and 42 are made correspondingly greater. Obviously, in this manner any desired ratio of ingredients may be secured.

Another way to adjust the ratio is indicated diagrammatically in Fig. 7. In this instance, the piston 33 has an area less than that of barrel 1. For example, it may be of elliptical cross section, fitting closely within an elliptical insert 34 in barrel 1. This insert has a flange 35 attached to one side of the wall 56 (Figs. 3 and 9). as by screws 37. The flange 35 is provided with a groove 30 communicating, at its inner end 14, with the cylinder space formed by insert 34. The outer end 15 of the groove 30 communicates with the mixer mechanism hereinafter to be described.

The lead screws 38 and 39 (Fig. 3) are each provided with a cylindrical shaft portion 44 or 45, located intermediate the threaded sections. These shaft portions are appropriately supported in radial and thrust bearing structures 46, 47, 48, and 49, located in recesses in the wall halves 5 and 6 (Fig. 3) and opening into the space 8. Appropriate O-rings 50 surround the shaft portions 44 and 45, and are located in grooves formed in the halves 5 and 6.

In order to rotate the lead screws 38 and 39, these lead screws are provided with worm wheels 51 and 52 (see, also, Fig. 8). These worm wheels may be appropriately joined to the shaft portions 44 and 45 as by the aid of the cross pins 53.

A common driving worm 54 engages both of the worm wheels 51 and 52. This worm is located in the space 8. and is mounted on a shaft 55 coaxial with bushings 9 and 11. Shaft 55 is journaled at its upper end in a bushing 56 (Figs. 8, 9, and 11) located in a recess formed by the halves 5 and 6. An O-ring 57 is disposed around the upper end of the shaft 55, and in a groove formed by the two halves 5 and 6.

The worm 54 is shown as coupled to the shaft 55 as by the aid of a cross pin (Fig. 8). The lower threaded bushing provides a rotary thrust bearing support 58 (Fig. 8) for the shaft. This shaft is appropriately driven by an air motor mechanism encased in a hollow handle or housing 59 (Figs. 2, 8, and 9). Air may be supplied to the air motor in the housing 59 by the aid of an air hose 60. The housing 59 is arranged to be held appropriately in place by the aid of a nut structure 61 that has a flange overlapping the lower flange 62 of the bushing 11. It is threaded on a member 63 held in the housing 59. The housing 59 is provided with saddle portions 64 (Figs. 2 and 9) adapted to engage the lower side of the barrel 1. As the nut structure 61 is rotated, these saddle members 64 are urged upwardly into contact with the barrel 1. A set screw 121 extends through one of these saddle members to lock nut 61 against inadvertent rotation.

Interposed between the air motor in the housing 59 and the worm shaft 55 is a planetary reduction gearing 65 (Fig. 8), and which is enclosed in member 63. Since this reduction gearing forms no part of the present invention, further description is unnecessary. It is suflicient to note that the rotation of the air motor is controlled by a trigger 66 (Fig. 2) which may be optionally operated to cause the air motor to rotate in either direction or to stop the air motor. In this way, the pistons 23 may be caused to move in either direction for the mixing operation, as well as for the retraction of the pistons 23 for the purpose of reloading the barrel 1.

The pistons 23 urge the materials to be mixed through appropriate ports formed in the wall halves 5 and 6. As shown most clearly in Fig. 9, wall half 5 has a port 67 communicating with space 2, and wall half 6 has a corresponding port 68 communicating with space 3. These are arranged diametrically opposite each other with respect to the bushing 9. This bushing is also appropriately apertured for the passage of the materials.

Thus, bushing 9 has diametrically opposite ports 122 and 123 aligned respectively with ports 67 and 68 (Fig. 9). These ports are in communication, respectively, with ports 124 and 125 in bushing 9, said ports 124 and 125 having a substantial angular extent about the axis of the bushing.

The materials passing through the ports 67, 68, 122, and 123 can pass through a series of apertures 69 located in the end of a hollow body member 70 (Figs. 8, 9, l0, and 11). This hollow body member 70 has a threaded portion 71 engaging the corresponding internal threads in the bushing 9. This body member is provided with a flanged head 72 which may be knurled (Figs. 2 and for manual assembly with the plug 9.

Interposed between the lower surface of the head 72 and the top of the plug 9 is a collector member 73 (Figs. 2, 8, 9, ll, 13, and 14). This collector member, as will be hereinafter described, provides an annular mixing chamber 74 into which the materials are urged under pressure.

This chamber 74 is placed in communication with the nozzle 4, as by the aid of the coupling 75 (Figs. 1, 2, 13, and 14). This coupling is omitted in Figs. 8 and 9. The nozzle 4 thus receives the discharged intermixed materials. This nozzle may further be supported by the aid of a standard 76 (Figs. 1 and 2) mounted on top of the barrel 1.

As shown most clearly in Figs. 8, 9, and 11, the body 70 is coaxial with the shaft 55.

The materials to be mixed enter by way of ports 67 and 68, and the apertures 69, past another group of apertures 77 (Figs. 8, 9, and 10) in the lower end of a sleeve 78. This sleeve 78 telescopes within the body 70. It is angularly adjustable in order to close the apertures 69 (Fig. ll) or to place these apertures in register with the apertures in sleeve 78 (Fig. 8).

A chopper sleeve member 79 (Figs. 8, 9, l0, l1, l3, and 14) telescopes within the upper end of the sleeve 78, and is shown as integral with a lower end Wall 80 (Figs. 8, 9, ll, 13, and 14). This wall 80 has a non-circular aperture 125 (such as of hexagonal form), press-fitted over a hexagonal hub 81. This hub 81 has a square aperture telescoping over a corresponding non-circular end 83 of the shaft 55. Accordingly, rotation of shaft 55 causes rotation of the chopping sleeve 79.

A series of slots 84 (Figs. 8, 9, l0, and 11) extend longitudinally through the chopping sleeve 79. These slots are narrow along the length of sleeve 79, and present cutting edges that cooperate with the edges of apertures 77 of the shut-off sleeve 78 (Fig. 9) as shaft 55 rotates. The chopped material passes through the slots into the interior of chopping sleeve 79. At the lower portions of the slots there are curved bottom walls 129 serving as sloping guides for the passage of the chopped material into the interior of sleeve 79.

Egress from the interior of chopping sleeve 79 is effected through a series of apertures 85 at the upper end of this sleeve (Figs. 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, and 14).

The upper end of the shut-off sleeve 78 is provided with a series of apertures 86 which can be made to register with the corresponding apertures 85 of chopper sleeve 79, or placed out of registry therewith. Fig. 13 illustrates the apertures in alignment, and Fig. 14 illustrates these apertures out of alignment. While the sleeve 78 is in the position of Figs. 8 and 13, flow of material into and out of the interior of the chopper sleeve 79 is permitted; and this material is forced by the pressure in cylinder spaces 2 and 3 into the sleeve 79 and outwardly through apertures 85. When the shut-off sleeve 78 is moved to the position of Fig. 14, the flow of material to the interior of sleeve 79 is prevented.

A supplemental shut-off sleeve 87, angularly movable with the sleeve 78, telescopes within the upper end of the rotating chopper member 79. This sleeve valve is provided with a series of apertures 110 that can be moved into registry with outlet apertures 131 of the body 70 (Fig. 13). When sleeves 78 and 87 are angularly adjusted to a proper position, as indicated in Fig. 13, the materials can proceed through the ports 67, 68, apertures 69 and 77, through slots 84, into sleeve 79, and then radially outwardly through the apertures 110 in member 87 to be further chopped by the chopper sleeve 79 and urged through the openings 86 of the sleeve valve 78, and finally through the openings 131 into the annular collecting chamber 74 of the collector 73.

Chopping occurs between the stationary member 87, as well as the sleeve member 78, by the interposition and rotation of the chopper sleeve 79. While pressure is exerted upon the material in the cylinder chambers 2 and 3, the material follows the path hereinbefore described, and is comminuted by the coaction of the edges of the slots 84 of the chopper sleeve 79 with the edges of apertures 77, the shut-off sleeve 78, as well as by the coaction between apertures 85 in sleeve 79 and apertures 110 and 86 of the shut-off sleeves 78 and 87. The mixing action is also augmented due to the fact that the materials are smeared by rubbing in the small clearance between the sleeves 78, 79, and 87.

The effect of this chopping and smearing action is that small particules of the materials are delivered into the chamber 74. These particles have thus been intimately intermixed by the combined effect of pressure, rubbing, and chopping that takes place within and through the sleeves 78, 87, and 79.

The sleeve valve 78 is attached, as by a cross pin 88, to a head 89 (Figs. 8, 9, l0, and 11). This head has a flange 93 contacting the upper edge of sleeve 78. The inner sleeve 87 is formed integrally with the head 89. At the upper end of the head 89, there is a conical shoulder 91 contacting a corresponding interior conical surface formed in head 72. In this way, axial movement of member 89 is restricted.

Head 72 is provided with an interrupted hollow cylinder 92 into which the upper cylindrical portion 94 of the head 89 projects. An ear 95 is integrally formed with portion 94. A handle 97 for adjusting the sleeve valves 78 and 87 is pivoted on this car 95, as by a pin 132 pass ing through the clevis 96 formed at the end of handle 97. In the full-line position of Fig. 8, the handle has a limited angular movement defined by the side surfaces 133 (Figs. 10 and 12) of the hollow cylinder 92. This angular range corresponds to open or closed position of shut-off sleeves 78 and 87. By movement of the handle 97 to the upright position shown in phantom lines in Fig. 8, the head 89 can be readily disassembled from the member 72.

For resiliently maintaining the handle 97 in either the active position or the upright position (shown in phantom in Fig. 8), use is made of a plunger 134 having a head 135 urged inwardly toward car 95 by a compression spring 136. This compression spring is accommodated in a cylindrical recess 137 of handle 97. The head 135 is guided by this recess.

In the full-line position of Fig. 8, the head 135 contacts one of the edges of car 95. In the phantom line position, the head 135 engages the top surface of the ear.

The lead screws 38 and 39 are rotated to bring the pistons 23 toward each other by the rotation of shaft 55 in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 3. Accordingly, the friction between the cylindrical surfaces of chopper sleeve 79 and the sleeve valves 78 and 87 (when sealing compound is contained between these surfaces) is such as to move the handle member 97 to the dot-and-dash position of Fig. 12. In this position, the sleeve valves are in open position, permitting the discharge of the comminuted mixture into the mixing chamber 74. However, manual movement of the handle 97 in a counterclockwise direction will close the apertures.

In operation, the materials to be mixed, such as the catalyzer and the rubber compound, are placed within the cylindrical spaces 2 and 3 through the piston openings normally closed by plugs 32. When it is desired to ex trude a mixed compound through the nozzle 4, the trigger 66 is operated to rotate the transmission in the proper direction for forcing the materials from the cylinder spaces 2 and 3 into the interior of the chopper sleeve 79 via openings 69 and 77 and slots 84. The intermixed materials are then forced through the openings 110 in the sleeve 87, and are further chopped by shearing action of the edges of the relatively rotating apertures 110, 84, and 86, and smeared between the surfaces of sleeves 87, 79, and 78. They finally are urged by pressure into the collecting chamber 74 and thence to the nozzle 4.

This method of mixing is particularly effective for the tacky compound, as the chopper serves to separate the intermingled materials into small pieces which are then further intimately associated in the space between the surfaces of sleeves 87, 79, and 78. For practical purposes, the rate of rotation of the chopper 79, imparted to it by shaft 55, is of the order of 50 to 100 revolutions per minute.

In the form shown in Fig. 15, the mixing chamber is formed by a spherical surface 101 and defined by the aid of the inlet member 102 and an outlet member 103. Inlet ports 104 lead to the cylinder spaces of barrel 1. An agitator shaft 105 carries an annular agitator 106. For proper mixing, the shaft 105 is rotated at about two hundred revolutions per minute. The beating action of the agitator 106 serves effectively to cut and intermingle the constituent parts, which ultimately pass through the outlet port 107. The shaft 105 must be quite rapidly rotated to produce the proper mixing action.

In the form shown in Fig. 16, there are a pair of stationary concentric cylindrical members or sleeves 140 and 141. interposed between these two cylindrical members is a rotary tubular member 142 mounted upon the shaft 143. Narrow annular spaces are formed between these three cylindrical members. The inner cylindrical member 140 is hollow, and connects to the outlet port 144.

The inlet ports 145 from the cylinder spaces of barrel 1 communicate with the lower end of the outer annular space 146. The inner annular space 147 and space 146 are in communication at the top of the structure.

The relative rotary motion of the surfaces of the members 140, 141, and 142 produces a kneading or smearing action which is effective in the intermingling of the constituent elements. In this instance, somewhat more power is required to operate the device, as there is a substantial friction encountered in this kneading or smearing action. The course of the material is first of all urged upwardly through the annular passage 146, then downwardly through the annular passage 147, and finally upwardly through the innermost hollow cylindrical member 141. The annular spaces 146 and 147 are purposely made rela' tively narrow in order effectively to provide the kneading action.

In the form shown in Fig. 17, a pair of stationary apertured discs 148 and 149 are held in spaced relation by the aid of their contacting flanges 150 and 151. The flange 150 rests upon an appropriate shoulder in the body member 152. The flanges are held in close contact by the externally threaded outlet member 153.

Three discs 154, 155, and 156 are held in axially spaced relation at the end of a rotary agitator shaft 157. The end discs 154 and 146 are disposed respectively below the disc 149 and above the disc 148. The intermediate rotary disc 155 is disposed between the two stationary discs 148 and 149. Each of the discs 148, 149, 154, 155, and 156 is provided with a series of through apertures arranged near the circumference of the discs. The apertures in the central disc 155 are staggered with respect to the apertures in the outer discs 154 and 156. All of the discs are relatively closely spaced to each other to provide only a small amount of clearance. At no instance can material flow through more than two discs, due to the staggered apertures. Thus, smearing is effected between the flat surfaces of the discs.

The inlet ports 158 and 159, as before, lead to the cylinder spaces, and extend beneath the lowermost rotary disc 154. The member 153 provides the oulet port 160.

In the form of the mixer illustrated in Figs. 18 to 22, intermixture of the rubber material and catalyzer is accomplished by a rotating interrupted threaded chopping member 161.

A hollow body member 162 is accommodated in the threaded aperture formed by the halves 5 and 6 in place of the bushing 9. The body member 162 has at its lower end inlet ports 163 and 164 cooperable with the ports 67 and 68 of the halves 5 and 6 respectively. The body member has a through axial bore 165 that accommodates the chopping member 161. An annular flange 166 is formed at the upper end of the body member cooperable with a flange 167 of the chopper member for limiting downward movement of the chopper member 161 with respect to the body member 162. Projections 168 of the chopping member 161 are provided in the form of peripherally interrupted flanges arranged in this instance spirally as interrupted threads. The projections are not all axially aligned. Accordingly, the flow of the materials is caused to follow a path having substantial changes in directions whereby the materials are thoroughly intermixed.

The bore 165 of the body member has only slight clearance with respect to the upper turns of the helically arranged projections 168. Flow of the material is then made to progress through the spaces between the projections 168. While the projections are arranged helically, they are in left-handed arrangement. Accordingly, angular rotation of the chopping member 161 in a clockwise direction as viewed from above does not aid in the ultimate upward fiow of the material. While upward flow is permitted by the spacing between the projections, the helically arranged projections 168 produce a churning action.

At the lower portion of the body member 162, the bore 170 is enlarged to provide an annular space facilitating entry of the material into the body member 162 through the ports 163 and 164. The material is thus easily permitted to come in intimate contact with the projections 168 of the chopping member 161.

The chopping member 161 carries a spur gear 172 extending abovethe body member 162. A cap member 173 provides an appropriate recess 175 for accommodating the gear 172. The cap 173 closes the body member 162 and is secured by the aid of bolts 174. This cap member has an integrally formed downwardly extending pin projection 176 accommodated within a corresponding bore 9 171 of the gear 172. The pin 176, together with the closely fitting bore 165, guides the chopping member 161 for rotation about its longitudinal axis 177.

As shown most clearly in Figs. 19, 20, and 21, a groove 178 at the upper end of the body member 162 forms the outlet passageway from the body member 162. This groove 178 forms a path leading around the flange 167 to a recess 205 (Fig. 21) in the cap 173.

A gear 179 is accommodated in an arcuate recess 180 of the cap member 173 that communicates with the recess 175 for the gear 172. The gear member 179 has a shaft extension 181 fitting in an appropriate recess 182 of the cap member 173 for guiding the gear member for rotation. This gear member 179 is in engagement with the gear 172, and is rotated thereby.

The passage forming grooves 178 and 205 are in communication with the bottom of the gear 179. An outlet passage 183 in the cap 173 communicates with the upper portions of both gear recesses 17S and 180, as shown in Figs. 18 and 19.

Assuming a clockwise rotation of the chopping member 161, as viewed in Fig. 19, the gear member 179 is caused to rotate in a counterclockwise direction. The material passing from the body member 162 and into the cap 173 by the aid of the grooves 178 and 205 enters the spaces between the teeth of the gear member 179 and is carried arcuately and upwardly in the gear recess 180. The outlet passage 183, communicating with the upper portion of recess 180, receives that portion of the material in recess 180 that is at the higher level, and such portion may then pass outwardly of the mixing member. Another portion of the material in recess 180 that is at the lower level therein is brought into contact with the teeth of the driving gear 172, and may pass to an intermediate collection point formed by a recess 184 (Fig. 19) communicating with the upper portions of the gear recesses 175 and 180. From this collection point, some material may be urged again around the gear recess 180. Another part of the material in the recess 184 is carried by the gear 172 clockwise about its recess 175 and thence to the outlet passage 183. The material thereby becomes further intermixed.

The gear members 172 and 179 act as a pump that aids the flow of material through the device. Accordingly, a high rate of flow can be achieved without requiring the pistons 23 to develop an extremely high pressure in the cylindrical spaces 2 and 3, which might otherwise be of the order of several hundred pounds per square inch. An improved operation is thus achieved. The gears furthermore cause a substantial intermixture of the material by engagement of the teeth of the gear members 171 and 179, as well as by smearing action.

Since the projections 168 of the chopper member 161 are arranged helically, but in left-handed arrangement, a reversal of the air motor mechanism might induce a flow of material outwardly of the passage 183 without the application of pressure by the pistons 23. It is thus important that the mixer be inoperative while the pistons 23 are retracted, such as for refilling the chambers 2 and 3. A one-way drive for the chopping member 161 ensures against such undesired flow. For this purpose, a clutch member 185 is provided that has an appropriate non-circular recess 186 for coupling the shaft 55. This clutch member 185 is accommodated in an axial recess 187 in the bottom of the chopping member 161. The member 185 has a series of angularly spaced, longitudinally extending slots 188 facing the bore 187. Each of these slots 188 is of maximum depth, or minimum distance from the axis of rotation at the clockwisemost portion of the slots, and is of continuously decreasing depth or increasing radial distance in the counterclockwise direction of the slots 188. The slots 188 thus form wedgeshaped spaces with the bore 187.

Accommodated within the slots 188 respectively are rolling elements 189, the diameters of which are such that they may be accommodated at the clockwisemost portion of the slots 188 without contacting the wall form ing the bore 187 of the chopping member 161. Upon clockwise rotation of the clutch member in the position illustrated in Fig. 20, the rolling elements are urged toward the counterclockwisemost position of the slots 188, bringing the rolling elements 189 into engagement with the wall forming the bore 187. Accordingly, upon clockwise rotation of the clutch member 185, the rolling elements 189 become firmly wedged to couple the chopping member 161 for rotation with the clutch member 185. Upon reversal of the air motor mechanism, the clutch member 185 is caused to rotate in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 20. Accordingly, the rolling elements 189 are urged to the deep end of the slots 188, thereby unclutching the chopping member 161 from the mechanism. Reversed rotation of the chopping member 161 is thus prevented.

The cap member 173 has an interiorly threaded portion 190 in alignment with the outlet port 183, for cooperation with a threaded extension 191 of a coupling member 192 for the nozzle 4.

For controlling the low of material through the mixing mechanism, a plug valve 193 cooperates with the outlet passage 183. This plug 193 is substantially of cylindrical form and is accommodated in a cylindrical recess 194 intersecting the outlet passage 183 at right angles thereto. This recess 194, opening on one side of the cap member 173, permits insertion of the plug 193. The plug 193 has a non-circular end 195 engaged by a corresponding aperture 196 of an operator 197. A resilient O-ring 198 accommodated in an appropriate groove 199 in the plug 193 prevents outward flow of material along the closure 193.

As shown most clearly in Fig. 18, the plug 193 has a through transverse port 200 that may be aligned with the outlet passage 183 for uninterrupted flow through the device. For limiting movement of the plug 193 and for maintaining it in assembled relationship with the cap 173, an arcuate slot 201 extends partially around the outside of the plug 193. The threaded extension 191 has a reduced cylindrical portion 202 that extends within the slot 201. This cylindrical projection 202 has a diameter corresponding to the axial distance between the opposed axially spaced walls 203 of the recess 201. Accordin-gly, when the apparatus is in assembled position, the plug 193 is prevented from moving axially in the recess 194. This ensures proper alignment of the outlet passage 183 with the through port 200. Furthermore, the projection 202 limits angular adjustment of the plug 193 by engagement with the arcuately spaced end walls 204 of the recess 201. As illustrated in Fig. 18, the projection 202 is engaged by one end wall of the recess, corresponding to counterclockwisemost adjustment of the plug 193. This end wall is so located that it corresponds precisely to accurate alignment of the port 200 with the outlet passage 183. Clockwise rotation of the plug 193, from the position illustrated in Fig. 18, is limited by the other end wall of the recess and ensures against unintentional movement of the closure 193 beyond fully closed position.

In the form illustrated in Figs. 23 to 27, a body member 210 cooperates with the halves 5 and 6. The body member 210 provides inlet ports 211 and 212 at opposite sides of the body member. A sleeve member 213 is inserted in a longitudinal bore 214 or"; the body member, and mounts a gear pump structure that not only causes intimate intermixture of the rubber material and cutalyzer, but reduces the pressure required to be developed by the pistons 23. A main driving gear 215 of the gear pump is accommodated in an axial recess 216 in the sleeve 213 and is therein guided for angular rotation about an axis 217. This gear has in its lower end a non-circular recess 218 cooperable with the shaft of the air motor. The sleeve 213 has an annular, inwardly directed flange 219 that provides a seat for the main gear 215 and permits access of the air motor shaft to the non-circular recess 218.

The sleeve 213 has inclined ports 220 and 221 aligned with the inlet ports 211 and 212 of the body member 210. The ports 220 and 221 communicate with the axial bore 216 housing the main gear at places in the bore 216, communicating not only with the sides of the gear 215 but with the bottom thereof (Fig. 23).

As shown most clearly in Figs. 26 and 27, the sleeve 213 also has longitudinally extending arcuate recesses 222 and 223 communicating with the recess 216 of the main gear 215. These recesses 222 and 223 are on diametrically opposite sides of the axis 217 of gear 215. In the recesses are driven gears 224 and 225 in engagement with the main gear 215. The ports 220 and 221 are so located, as illustrated in Fig. 26, that they communicate not only with the main gear recess 216, but also with these recesses 222 and 223 respectively. Accordingly, the gears 224 and 225 cooperate with the main gear 215 to form gear pumps interposed in the paths of the material for aiding in the flow of the material that enters the ports 211 and 212 respectively. The gear structures also cause intimate intermixture of the material, since material entering the port 212 is carried into contact with the material entering through port 211 by the rotating structurc, etc.

The sleeve 213 has at its upper end an annular flange 226 engaged by the main body member 210 to limit downward movement of the sleeve 213 in the bore 214. A flanged plate 227 (Figs. 23 and 25) has a reduced portion accommodated within an annular recess 228 of the flange 226. This plate, as illustrated most clearly in Fig. 27, has apertures 229 and 230 piloting shaft extensions 231 and 232 of the gears 224 and 225, respectively. The sleeve 213 furthermore has apertures 233 and 234 piloting shaft extensions at the other ends of the gears 224 and 225, respectively. The apertures 229 and 230 of the plate 227 and the apertures 233 and 234 of the sleeve 213 serve accurately to mount the gears 224 and 225 for rotation.

A cap member 235, forming the outlet 236 of the mixer mechanism, is secured to the main body member 210 by the aid of bolts 237 and 238. These bolts extend through appropriate apertures in the plate 227 and the flange 226 of the sleeve 213 for providing accurate alignment of the members. The bolts 237 and 238 are engaged by interrupted threads provided by the main body member 210.

The cap 235 provides a bore or chamber 255 (Fig. 23) adapted to form a part of the passage for the material. This chamber 255 opens on the lower side of the cap 235 and is in substantial alignment with the recess 216 for the main gear. Communication is established between the bore 216, recesses 222 and 223 for the gear members 224 and 225 to the chamber 255 by the aid of appropriate apertures 239 and 240 (Fig. 25) through the plate 227.

Arcuate recesses 241 and 242 formed in the upper part of sleeve 213 (see dotted lines in Fig. 23; and also see Fig. 26) are in registry with the apertures 239 and 240 to facilitate the flow from the gear pump into the chamber 255. An outlet chamber 243 (Fig. 23), in communication at its lower end with the chamber 255, communicates at the other end with the interior of a coupling member 244 threadedly accommodated in the cap member 235.

The coupling member 244, as shown most clearly in Fig. 24, provides a cylindrical outlet passage 245 communicating with the nozzle 4. In this passage 245 is a screw pump member 246 designed to aid in the flow of material through the mixer. This member has helically arranged threads that, upon rotation of the member 246, urges the material outwardly of the passage 245. This pump member 246 has a shaft extension 248 piloted in a recess 249 of the cap member 235.

For rotating the pump member 246, a bevel gear construction is provided (Figs. 23 and 24). One bevel gear 250 is carried by the shaft 248 of the pump 246 and is located in the outlet chamber 243. This bevel gear 250 is engaged by another bevel gear 251 in the chamber 238. The bevel gear 251 is mounted on a non-circular shaft extension 252 of the main gear 215 (see, also, Fig. 25). This shaft extension 252 extends into the chamber 255 through an appropriate aperture 253 of the plate 227. Appropriate slots 254, spaced apart, are provided in the connector member 244 to facilitate flow of material into intimate engagement with the pump member 246.

Upon clockwise rotation of the main gear 215 by the air motor mechanism, as viewed in Figs. 24, 25, and 26, the threads 247 are arranged to aid the flow of material upon rotation of the pump member 246.

The bevel gear construction 250, 251 not only serves as the transmission mechanism for the pump 246, but aids the gear pump structures 215, 224, 225 in eflecting intimate intermixture of the material.

The form of the invention illustrated in Figs. 28 to 31 is similar to the form illustrated in Figs. 18 to 22. It utilizes both a rotary chopping member 260 and a gear pump construction. The gear pump causes intimate intermixture and reduces the pressure required to be produced by the pistons 23.

A main body member 261 is threadedly accommodated in the halves 5 and 6. The main body member 261 has an axial aperture 262 guidingly receiving the chopping member 260. Inlet ports 263 and 264 are provided on opposite sides of the body member 261 for feeding the material into the aperture 262.

In the present instance, the main body member 261 has a plurality of longitudinally spaced series of angularly spaced projections 265 (Figs. 30 and 31) cooperating with a corresponding plurality of longitudinally spaced series of angularly spaced projections 266 of the chopping member 2641. The chopping member 260 can be telescoped into the body member 261 by angularly displacing the projections 265 and 266 of the members 261 and 260, respectively, before the parts are moved axially together. Such angular position is shown most clearly in Fig. 30. A flange 267 at the upper portion of the chopping member 260 is disposed above the uppermost series of projections 265 of the body member 261. In such assembled position, the series of projections 266 of the rotary chopping member 260 are longitudinally spaced from the series of projections 265 of the body member 261. Accordingly, when the chopping member is so located, it may be rotated with the body member 261, the projections 266 longitudinally interleaving with the projections 265 of the body member 261.

The material entering the aperture 262 of the main body member 261 under pressure through the inlets 263 and 264 must move around the relatively rotating projections, thereby causing mixing of the material. As shown most clearly in Fig. 30, there are only five projections 265 in each series of projections of the main body member 261. There are ten projections in each series of projections of the chopping member 260. Accordingly, for any angular position of the chopping member 260 in the main body member 261, there are five substantially uninterrupted longitudinal paths for the material that is mixed. Such paths are illustrated by the reference character 278, for instance. Such uninterrupted paths 278 are not undisturbed, since the projections 265 of the main body member soon Cross such paths upon rotation of the chopping member. Other distinct through longitudinal passages are then formed. The interleaving projections thus completely mix the different materials entering through the ports 263 and 264.

For rotating the chopping member 261, an appropriate non-circular aperture 268 is provided in the bottom thereof for engagement with the non-circular extension of the air motor shaft.

A cap member 269, secured to the main body member 261 by the aid of bolts 270, provides the outlet pas-

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Classifications
U.S. Classification366/77, 100/185, 222/334, 222/390, 366/100, 222/135, 366/184, 241/98, 418/196, 422/256, 222/145.6, 239/304, 239/142, 222/275, 425/207, 411/984
International ClassificationB29B7/60, B01F13/00, B01F5/14, B01F7/00, B29B7/74
Cooperative ClassificationB01F5/14, B01F7/008, Y10S411/984, B29B7/7457, B01F13/002, B01F2215/0039, B29B7/603
European ClassificationB01F13/00K2B, B01F5/14, B29B7/60B, B29B7/74G, B01F7/00G2